Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Seagrave1963 On: Fri Sep 26, 2014 8:25 pm

Noob here - Thanks for posting this, very helpful.
Seagrave1963
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman TLC2000
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut
Other Heating: electric heat pumps, propane fireplace

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Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Crystalmadness On: Tue Oct 28, 2014 4:53 pm

Hello folks, I'm new to this forum and all types of forums for that matter. I'm a mineral collector hence the username. I'm on my 3rd used woodstove and this one will also take coal. It is a King Circulator Model 9901B and I cant find any info on it since the company that made them (Atlanta Stove Works) is long gone. What I'm trying to find out is what type of coal can it burn, (anthracite or bituminous), what size coal do they recommend for it, and where can I get the 12" X 8" X 3/4" Firebrick (or combination of bricks) for the back wall? the side bricks are the standard 4x9.5.1.25 but the back pocket is thinner and not a cumulative # of the standard bricks will not work even if they were thinner. The stove has been previously used without the back wall bricks but only wood has been burned in it. I know coal burns hotter so I want the back wall protected as the inside of the outer decorator skin shows signs of getting hot on the inside of it along the back and coal would cause even more heat and possible damage without the additional bricks. I would love an owners manual too but can't find that either. The Maine winter is coming so any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks, Richard
Crystalmadness
 
Other Heating: King Circulator Wood/Coal stove Model 9901B

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: freetown fred On: Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:15 pm

Welcome to the FORUM CM, how do your grates look. Not sure where you would get thinner bricks?? Hopefully someone else does. Some pix of your stove would be real helpful as far as suggestions go.
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:27 pm

You can cast your own bricks using Rutland castable refractory. Make up a frame for one or more bricks from 3/4 thick wood. Coat with oil to prevent sticking, and if the frame is open on bottom lay it on a sheet of wax paper. Assemble with screws for ease of removing bricks. Mix refractory according to directions and trowel into mold and strike off level. Better to keep the mix on the dry side rather than too runny. Bricks will be stronger that way.

Use nut coal to start with. You might try stove size later.
Make sure any air entering ash pan area can not bypass the grate. All air has to rise up through the grate and coal. Fiberglass can be stuffed into any areas that leak air past the grate, if any.
Use anthracite as bit coal will be smoky, sooty, and smelly.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:59 pm

Welcome Crystalmadness...I'm glad you're in geology and not the other :lol: and it's nice to have another Mainah' on board we're running low since FFred moved :P Is your stove similar to the "Ashley",or "Wonderlux" circulater? I found this as well
Looking at a King Coal/Wood Stove
Where in Maine are you?
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box stove, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Baseburners & Antiques: Home Sparkle 12
Coal Size/Type: Coal Contractor's stove, a little Kimmels 'nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: McGiever On: Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:01 pm

McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Crystalmadness On: Wed Oct 29, 2014 8:58 am

My grates look fine, bit rusty but solid. I'm missing the shaker handle tho and did find a few online but they want like $35 for them with S/H for like $2 worth of steel. Waiting to find a cheaper one or maybe make something up. At the moment I only have a pic of the ID plate if I can figure out how to post it. Did it, I think
This King looks just like an Ashley or a Wonderlux on the outside. In fact this King is replacing an Ashley I had that was separating at the seams. the inside of the King Circulator is different with 2 swiveling grates geared together which is what I need the shaker handle for. It has a spring loaded vent in the ash pan door plus a temp controlled vent door on the front into the ash pan area also. And there is a vent door in the main wood feed door too. Lots of vents here. I live in Southern Maine near Lake Arrowhead
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Crystalmadness
 
Other Heating: King Circulator Wood/Coal stove Model 9901B

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:25 am

My concern with these multi fuels is that they get over fired with wood because people try to heat a large space with them. I looked at the new Ashley type a few yrs ago when I was thinking about coal and found them somewhat light for my application. You state this is your 3rd wood stove, this should be a red flag. My 2 coal stoves that I use will last my life time if used properly, 1 is already 30 plus yrs old and I think my Vigilant is 10 or so yrs. If you could afford a used coal stove, there are many in your area. Now about the King, if it was used without fire bricks chances are it won't handle a stove full of coal. Blacksmiths forge metal with a coal fire and a stove that has been compromised could be very dangerous. Please do a search in the upper right corner on how to start a coal fire and put a pot of coffee on. I don't want to seem negative but your safety is very positive! Mike.

P.S. Operating the King should require a couple C.O. detectors in the house ;)
Also start a new thread if you like about your stove and the response will be better!
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box stove, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Baseburners & Antiques: Home Sparkle 12
Coal Size/Type: Coal Contractor's stove, a little Kimmels 'nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

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Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: BlueMountains On: Wed Sep 09, 2015 11:21 pm

OK I am confused by this statement........Newbie sorry

As you are adding coal, leave an area of the coal bed exposed that has blue flames present. This is very important because the new coal will give off volatile gas as it heats up. If a flame is present, this gas will burn off harmlessly, evidenced by blue flames dancing across the new coal. Additional secondary air will help maintain the flames for burning off these volatiles.

I thought once you shook down the coal and cleaned out the ash from the firebox you just added coal and opened the primary damper to allow her to heat back up. You cant get the dancing ladies when you fill the pot back up like William does in his videos. Unless your suggesting to fill it up a little at a time over the course of like 30 minutes to keep the blue flames going. ????
BlueMountains
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood no. 8
Other Heating: Hearthstone Equinox

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Sep 10, 2015 6:35 am

Leaving an exposed area of burning coal when refueling is to help prevent puff backs. Puff back happens when a build up of volatile gases in the stove chamber meet the right fuel/oxygen ratio along with a source of ignition. There are a few ways to prevent this. Another way is to keep the volatile gases diluted with extra secondary air or by keeping the load door cracked a smidgen..
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: aecyb083@gmail.com On: Wed Aug 17, 2016 10:50 pm

Do you know anything about the 3720 Godin stove? What size stove pipe. Since it burns coal should I have double wall or triple wall pipe?
Should I fit the pipe on the outside of the back where the adapter is to attach or should the pipe fit on inside of the adapter? Thanks, Mary
aecyb083@gmail.com
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: #3720 Godin Stove

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: franco b On: Wed Aug 17, 2016 11:07 pm

aecyb083@gmail.com wrote:Do you know anything about the 3720 Godin stove? What size stove pipe. Since it burns coal should I have double wall or triple wall pipe?
Should I fit the pipe on the outside of the back where the adapter is to attach or should the pipe fit on inside of the adapter? Thanks, Mary


I think that is the small round model. If so the pipe is 4 inch. It fits over the adapter. Push pipe over adapter which is tapered for a tight fit.

Single wall is fine for stove to chimney connection provided there is proper clearance to combustibles.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

3720 Godin petite stove - any information

PostBy: aecyb083@gmail.com On: Wed Aug 17, 2016 11:11 pm

Thank you Franco B., Do you know if I have to have double wall or triple, to go through attic? The other thought would be getting a flex liner for the chimney. But I think I would have to find a flex for burning coal. Thanks, Again! M.
aecyb083@gmail.com
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: #3720 Godin Stove

Re: 3720 Godin petite stove - any information

PostBy: franco b On: Thu Aug 18, 2016 8:18 pm

aecyb083@gmail.com wrote:Thank you Franco B., Do you know if I have to have double wall or triple, to go through attic? The other thought would be getting a flex liner for the chimney. But I think I would have to find a flex for burning coal. Thanks, Again! M.


That seems to say you have a chimney. If so, describe it. Inner size and construction as well as height.

Liners are to be avoided if possible because they do not hold up well to the corrosive effects of fly ash with coal.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Visit Hitzer Stoves