Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:04 pm

gina wrote:I wonder if I didn't have enough of an ash bed down when I started the fire and so that's why it was burning so hot? It's slowed down now, with all doors closed and the round damper closed, I'm at about 350-370 on the stove.


In my mind there's no such thing as "enough of an ash bed" unless maybe yer trying to run it extremely low during warm weather. Ash is not our friend when it's cold outside. During moderate to high heat demand you want to keep the fuel bed as ash free as possible.

Those temps you posted look very good to me, as long as it's keeping you comfortable. Keep with trying to control the heat output of the stove with the primary air controls (air fed to the fuel bed under the grates) and keep that glass door closed. If it continues to run away on you keep cutting primary air. If that isn't fixing the runaways then we'll need to determine if it's getting primary air some other way, like thru a leaky gasket on the lower door (ash door), or something else

Keep up the good work, you'll be a coal expert in no time :)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

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Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:37 pm

franco b wrote:If you need 500 degrees in the very cold, you might have to go to more frequent tending times.

The aim should be to still have close to one half of burning coal still available to ignite the new coal load quickly.

If a stove holds 40 pounds, then loading 20 pounds at each tending would be best for a 12 hour burn and still have enough left burnibg to ignite the new coal. Being left with a small amount of burning coal can take a long time to get the new coal burning, or even lose the fire.


This is important too :)
Nicely stated, Richard.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:45 pm

To check the lower door for air leaks , take a dollar bill and close it in the door all around. Where the bill pulls out easily with the door latched , there will be a leak. If the bill is gripped tightly all over ,then the door is tight.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Basics of a Hand Fired Coal Stove

PostBy: Georgelap On: Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:10 pm

gina wrote:Here's a pic. It is mirrored since I took it with my computer.
Photo on 8-29-16 at 2.17 PM.jpg


Hi Gina!
It seem that your thermostat knob is missed...with this knob you regulate the primary air.

The other air regulator (I, II, III) controls the secondary air.

This stove as the most german made stoves is "allesbrener" (burns everything).
To make your stove work properly follow these regulations:

fully closed= coke coal
I = anthracite, semi anthracite
II= low vol bituminus
III= bit, lignite briquettes, sawdust bricks, wood

But first of all you have to find a primary air knob.

If you want to find this spare part take a look in german stove manufacturers sites. Most of them are exactly the same for decates.

George
Georgelap
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin 3720A, Buderus Juno
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Oscar- oil boiler

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