PP Stewart No 14

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: scalabro On: Fri May 02, 2014 3:41 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:They cleaned up very nicely Gek.

Bling is in the eye of the beholder. Because of my work, I tend toward making it look as much like it did when it left that factory as humanly possible. Goes along with preservation of a historic item that is also functional. I'm not a fan of changing history. But that gets me dirty looks and sometimes nasty comments from the street rod guys ! :roll:

Is that a crack right at the beginning of the left hand most scroll of the PPStewart plate ?

Paul


Good eye Paul!

Yes the left "ear" is broken and there are several hairline cracks between the letters. Since it's on a relatively "cold" part, I am going to braze the cracks and the broken piece with an oxy acetylene setup before the nickel work. It's a very thin and delicate casting and too intricate to try to weld.

Point well taken on the "Pimp" work, lol!

I'm just going to nickel the original plated parts and the knobs.

Too bad really that the upper ring will not be original but I know I will never find the correct one :(

Regards,
Scott
scalabro
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford No. 2, PP Stewart 14, Crawford 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired forced hot air

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri May 02, 2014 3:54 pm

Gekko wrote:
Sunny Boy wrote:They cleaned up very nicely Gek.

Bling is in the eye of the beholder. Because of my work, I tend toward making it look as much like it did when it left that factory as humanly possible. Goes along with preservation of a historic item that is also functional. I'm not a fan of changing history. But that gets me dirty looks and sometimes nasty comments from the street rod guys ! :roll:

Is that a crack right at the beginning of the left hand most scroll of the PPStewart plate ?

Paul


Good eye Paul!

Yes the left "ear" is broken and there are several hairline cracks between the letters. Since it's on a relatively "cold" part, I am going to braze the cracks and the broken piece with an oxy acetylene setup before the nickel work. It's a very thin and delicate casting and too intricate to try to weld.

Point well taken on the "Pimp" work, lol!

I'm just going to nickel the original plated parts and the knobs.

Too bad really that the upper ring will not be original but I know I will never find the correct one :(

Regards,
Scott



Using the Glenwood ring is as close to the original as you can "humanly possible" get to for now. And it's easily reversible if an original should ever turn up,. . . so your good in the eyes of the purists. :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: scalabro On: Mon May 05, 2014 6:52 pm

A mock up pic and one showing the damage to the firepot support. The cracks in the support will end up being a combination repair by filling the cracks with high nickel content rod, and adding two 1/2 x 2 inch support straps welded on the outer circumference of the support. The right plate that is blasted in the first pic has two small cracks that will be welded.

Also on the fire pot support I will heavily de burr all the casting flash to try to increase flow through the base. I know it won't really do a darn thing but I'll feel better that I tried to "blueprint" the stove as much as possible while it's torn down.
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scalabro
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford No. 2, PP Stewart 14, Crawford 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired forced hot air

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Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: BPatrick On: Tue May 06, 2014 9:32 am

This is a really cool looking stove. It's amazing how advanced coal burning technology was in the 1860's. I cannot wait to see pictures of it when your done tinkering with it.
BPatrick
 
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40 Baseheaters
Coal Size/Type: Stove Coal
Other Heating: Herald Oak No. 18

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: scalabro On: Tue May 06, 2014 7:27 pm

BPatrick wrote:This is a really cool looking stove. It's amazing how advanced coal burning technology was in the 1860's. I cannot wait to see pictures of it when your done tinkering with it.


Thanks Brian, I can't wait either.

All parts went to the the blaster today and they will be done tomorrow afternoon. I'll post up a pic of all the parts laid out on the ground. I just hope no more cracks show up. Nickel brazing is expensive..... :doh:
scalabro
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford No. 2, PP Stewart 14, Crawford 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired forced hot air

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed May 07, 2014 12:25 am

It's coming along nicely. A part like the fire pot base is a good candidate for a casting to keep as a spare.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: scalabro On: Wed May 07, 2014 7:46 am

wsherrick wrote:It's coming along nicely. A part like the fire pot base is a good candidate for a casting to keep as a spare.



Hmmmmm, perhaps after it's repaired I should send it off to Tomahawk to make a spare?

Honestly I don't think we will see another PP Stewart 14 any time soon but since I will keep this stove I will always have the option :mrgreen:

Always good to hear from you Obi-Wan, hope you are well my friend.
scalabro
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford No. 2, PP Stewart 14, Crawford 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired forced hot air

Re: PP Stewart No 14

PostBy: tmbrddl On: Thu May 08, 2014 2:52 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
BPatrick wrote:If you mean the Glenwood Modern Oaks with the optional back pipe, ......

The exhaust gases go out a pipe collar at the back upper part of the barrel, a bit higher up then they do on the Glenwood base heaters. The flue gases can either travel through the open pipe damper straight to the stack in direct mode, or, in indirect mode, . . .

The back pipe has a vertical cast iron divider that separates the front half of the pipe from the back half with a rectangular damper near the top of it. The divider has a semi -circular gap in the bottom edge that the outer edges of rest in slots in the base casting.

With the back pipe damper closed (indirect mode), . . the flue gases must travel down the front half of the back pipe, then make a 180 degree turn through that semi-circular gap and the base support casting, then travel up the back side of the pipe and on out to the stack.


Paul


I wondered what the divider was for. I imagine you'd need a well established draft before trying to move the gases down the pipe. How much of a difference have you noticed in heat output using it in the indirect mode?

Any tips on how to get the most efficient usage out of my stove would be great.
tmbrddl
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood Oak 30

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