coal fatigue

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 4:26 pm

wsherrick wrote:I'm not tired of Winter, because; I like cold weather. Winter has great beauty if you take time to look. I get home now in the wee hours of the morning when all is quiet and I look up into the absolute clearness of space, marveling at the beauty of the stars. They look so close and bright during the Winter. One of my favorite things is to sit quietly by the stove and look at how brilliantly the moon light illuminates the snow and see black trees set in silhouette, casting shadows on a carpet of silver.
Sunsets of pastel violet and rose reflecting off the white tops of the mountains causing them to glow red against a black blue twilight sky.
There are fantastical formations of the waterfalls frozen in place. I like to go to sleep listening to the North Wind howling through the bare trees, knowing that I am warm and secure.
Of course there are chores, there are always chores. Just take a look up every now and then to see what you can see.

I am tired of winter, because ; I don't like cold weather. Winter has some beauty if you can stay inside & look out while staying warm. Stars are beautiful to gaze at during warm weather,especially while laying on the lawn,smelling the flowers scent wafting on the night breeze . Warm weather brings the many colors of flowers,green grass to mow with its fragrance , yes , I like to mow the lawn,& work in the gardens which total about 2 acres,enjoy the smell of freshly turned soil. I like to hear water falls & not just see them. I like to sleep with the windows open & hear all the night sounds. I don't like plowing snow ,slipping & sliding on snow , & yes i am winter fatigued,tired of handling 400# of wood every day . I am looking forward to spring & looking forward to burning coal next season :!: :)
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: Cap On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 5:15 pm

I guess I experience coal fatigue too in past years but this year it hasn't happened yet. I find the picking up a ton of coal from the breaker and pulling it back home on a sat morning more stressful than the burning and ash removal.

The walls of snow ice closing in on me without any of it melting is the most stressful part of this winter. Half of my driveway paved area outside is not cleared and not possible to clear at this point. It's rock solid. Parking and turning around is a chore.
Cap
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF 250, domestic hot water loop, heat accumulator

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: steveyrock On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 5:26 pm

wsherrick wrote:I'm not tired of Winter, because; I like cold weather. Winter has great beauty if you take time to look. I get home now in the wee hours of the morning when all is quiet and I look up into the absolute clearness of space, marveling at the beauty of the stars. They look so close and bright during the Winter. One of my favorite things is to sit quietly by the stove and look at how brilliantly the moon light illuminates the snow and see black trees set in silhouette, casting shadows on a carpet of silver.
Sunsets of pastel violet and rose reflecting off the white tops of the mountains causing them to glow red against a black blue twilight sky.
There are fantastical formations of the waterfalls frozen in place. I like to go to sleep listening to the North Wind howling through the bare trees, knowing that I am warm and secure.
Of course there are chores, there are always chores. Just take a look up every now and then to see what you can see.


I found that eloquent description of a lovely winter landscape very relaxing as I sipped on a three fingers high glass of Crown Royal on the rocks.I started feeling warm and fuzzy inside as I pictured in my mind those beautiful snowy scenes which led to one of the best bowl movements I had all week.

I generally despise winter and everything that goes along with it because I work outside all day in the filthy crusted snow which requires having to wear layers of thick clothing that impedes movement and is heavy.I also enjoy split finger tips,torn cuticles and wind burned cheeks along with frozen whiskers and snotted nostrels.

You would enjoy your seated moments next to your warm stove way more after you spent 8 or so hours outside in harsh conditions,trust me. I had enough to last me of this years dose.
steveyrock
 


Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: joeq On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:09 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote: i am winter fatigued,tired of handling 400# of wood every day . I am looking forward to spring & looking forward to burning coal next season :!: :)


WOOD!? (Isn't that a 4 letter word around here?) :shock:
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: joeq On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:17 pm

Cap wrote:The walls of snow ice closing in on me without any of it melting is the most stressful part of this winter. Half of my driveway paved area outside is not cleared and not possible to clear at this point. It's rock solid. Parking and turning around is a chore.


I can relate to that. I wasn't able to keep up with the snow on my oversized 2 car driveway. The frt of my garage faces north, as does the house and walkway. The mounds of snow, (now ice) have been making it difficult to get out of the cars W/O stepping on a tapered wall of ice, next to them. My daughter actually slipped while rushing the other nite. Rock salt has been selling like lottery tickets, and is about as available as the job market. And trying to break the stuff up with an icebreaker is an exercise in futility. So I can honestly say, it wouldn't bother me to see that portion of winter gone.
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:20 pm

steveyrock wrote:
wsherrick wrote:I'm not tired of Winter, because; I like cold weather. Winter has great beauty if you take time to look. I get home now in the wee hours of the morning when all is quiet and I look up into the absolute clearness of space, marveling at the beauty of the stars. They look so close and bright during the Winter. One of my favorite things is to sit quietly by the stove and look at how brilliantly the moon light illuminates the snow and see black trees set in silhouette, casting shadows on a carpet of silver.
Sunsets of pastel violet and rose reflecting off the white tops of the mountains causing them to glow red against a black blue twilight sky.
There are fantastical formations of the waterfalls frozen in place. I like to go to sleep listening to the North Wind howling through the bare trees, knowing that I am warm and secure.
Of course there are chores, there are always chores. Just take a look up every now and then to see what you can see.


I found that eloquent description of a lovely winter landscape very relaxing as I sipped on a three fingers high glass of Crown Royal on the rocks.I started feeling warm and fuzzy inside as I pictured in my mind those beautiful snowy scenes which led to one of the best bowl movements I had all week.

I generally despise winter and everything that goes along with it because I work outside all day in the filthy crusted snow which requires having to wear layers of thick clothing that impedes movement and is heavy.I also enjoy split finger tips,torn cuticles and wind burned cheeks along with frozen whiskers and snotted nostrels.

You would enjoy your seated moments next to your warm stove way more after you spent 8 or so hours outside in harsh conditions,trust me. I had enough to last me of this years dose.


I'm outside most of the day at my job. Walking through snow covered railroad yards filled with hidden pits and trip hazards. I'm in freezing locomotive cabs rolling along at 80 MPH with no heat and extremely leaky doors and windows. Digging out frozen switches, frozen couplers that don't want to work. Ice covered steps and grab irons which if slipped on means a long fall to the ground and a trip to the hospital. I would laugh at an 8 hour day only. Sometimes I'm on duty for 18 hours or more during the night, during the day. The Railroad never sleeps.
As far as your split and chapped extremities go, get some Bag Balm.
Grow up in the Rural South with no air conditioning after working out in the field all day in 100 degree weather and 80 percent humidity. Heat like that which goes for months not days or a few weeks. Outside from Dawn to Dusk swatting gnats, mosquitoes, horseflies, sweat running down burning your eyes. Sleeping on the floor because it was too hot to sleep in the bed. We would pray for a Thunderstorm to relieve the misery of Summer.
Every season has good and bad points. Some people just like to whine about it no matter what the weather may happen to be.
Last edited by wsherrick on Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:24 pm

Seems like wood & coal are close cousins,as they both have 4 letters,they both keep folks warm at a much lower cost than the alternate fuels (oil,propane,electric),...... HOWEVER :!: read the bottom line as to how i feel about the one fuel. I am one who goes "overboard " when i plow snow,I can fix the lawn later,we can rake stones back later, I push the snow way,way back now,plenty of space for more when it comes. I wanted to say ,if it comes but that doesn't work this winter. I'm not whining either,just stating how i feel about winter/cold/snow/no flowers/can't work in the garden/..............
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:44 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:Seems like wood & coal are close cousins,as they both have 4 letters,they both keep folks warm at a much lower cost than the alternate fuels (oil,propane,electric),...... HOWEVER :!: read the bottom line as to how i feel about the one fuel. I am one who goes "overboard " when i plow snow,I can fix the lawn later,we can rake stones back later, I push the snow way,way back now,plenty of space for more when it comes. I wanted to say ,if it comes but that doesn't work this winter. I'm not whining either,just stating how i feel about winter/cold/snow/no flowers/can't work in the garden/..............


I just noticed the Daffodils I planted last Fall, starting to push up through the frozen ground. Spring will be here shortly.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 8:32 pm

:shock: How did you see daffodils ? ,no snow cover there ? We have at least a foot of snow cover most places,can't find any flowers,but i will try to look for some tomorrow b4 the snow starts again.
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 9:27 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote::shock: How did you see daffodils ? ,no snow cover there ? We have at least a foot of snow cover most places,can't find any flowers,but i will try to look for some tomorrow b4 the snow starts again.

We still have way over a foot on the ground. The ground near the basement wall next to the Glenwood is snow free. In that little patch of clear ground I can see them starting to come up. Perhaps the heat from the stove is making them sprout early.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: coal fatigue

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sat Mar 01, 2014 10:01 pm

NOTICE : All Glenwood owners,fire them up !! help the flowers ,melt the snow, lets see,how many will i need ?? :) :P ;)
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K