new with a question

Re: new with a question

PostBy: blrman07 On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:19 am

I would recommend you do not pull out that oil boiler. Set the coal boiler right next to the oil boiler and plumb them together. This spring I was looking at pulling my oil boiler out and just heating the house with my stove in the dining room and hot water with the bucket a day that I have.

Then I got the flu. 4 days in bed with fever and double vision. My wife couldn't tend the coal stove due to her health and size problems. She is 4'11" and has asthma so she never gets anywhere near the coal ash and can't physically carry a 40 lb bucket of coal to fill the hopper. I went back on the oil boiler for a week until I recovered enough to fire up the stove again.

Keep that oil boiler as an emergency backup and it will also give you the flexibility to take a trip during the winter time if you want or need to.

Rev. Larry
New Beginning Church
Ashland Pa.
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, reblacking a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: new with a question

PostBy: fstalfire On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 10:29 am

OK, so one of the $64k questions and one that may require some engineering......how big should the radiators be and how many in each room or what size radiator to room sq. ft?
fstalfire
 

Re: new with a question

PostBy: lsayre On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:53 pm

fstalfire wrote:OK, so one of the $64k questions and one that may require some engineering......how big should the radiators be and how many in each room or what size radiator to room sq. ft?


About 35 BTU's worth of radiator capacity per sq-ft of floor space should be plenty. Somewhat less if your house is newer and/or well insulated. And after you add all of the rooms up you will know how many total output BTU's you will need from your boiler.

My house has (on average) roughly 28 BTU's worth of fin-tube radiators per sq-ft, and it was built that way in 1964. Most fin-tubes are rated at between 550 and 600 BTU's per linear foot, with the assumption of water coming in at 180 degrees and returning at 160 degrees.

I believe the older classic cast iron type radiators are rated to be in the general range of 150 BTU's of output per square foot of their own radiating surface area, and when used with hot water (180 degree in, 160 degree returning), but don't quote me on this without the confirmation of someone who is more in the know regarding this type of radiator.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (It has been fixed!)

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Re: new with a question

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 2:17 pm

If you have some floor space ,just add a few 24"-36" radiators in addition to the baseboard,put the radiators on separate zone ,no need to complicate it .
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: new with a question

PostBy: rberq On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 2:50 pm

lsayre wrote:About 35 BTU's worth of radiator capacity per sq-ft of floor space should be plenty. Somewhat less if your house is newer and/or well insulated.

My house is old and badly insulated, built about 1864 as opposed to Larry's 1964. As best I can measure, I have capacity of at least 55 BTUs per square foot, with cast iron radiators.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: new with a question

PostBy: fstalfire On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:58 pm

so how do you find out the BTU's of a given radiator?
fstalfire
 

Re: new with a question

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Mar 02, 2014 10:21 pm

fstalfire wrote:so how do you find out the BTU's of a given radiator?

Post a picture of the radiator and number of sections and I can give an estimate.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: new with a question

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Mon Mar 03, 2014 6:13 am

fstalfire, welcome. Here's my little rant on cast iron radiators. I grew up with steam heat so part of my obsession with them might be nostalgia. The Victorian home my wife and I bought still has the original Gurney two pipe steam/hot water radiators. If your getting a new coal boiler and redoing piping I would go with cast iron radiators. There's a few shops that rebuild/refurb them. You can even buy brand new reproduction Victorian radiators from Europe. Baseboard will never give you the warm cozy feeling that a radiator will or the heat output for that matter. I would recommend the book "Classic Hydronics" by Dan Holohan if your considering radiators. It would be a good primer. There's another book by Dan that supposedly has the EDR (equivalence of direct radiation) of every radiator ever made. Can't remember the title at the moment. I'm sure you could find it in the store at Heating Help.com. Below are a few of mine. First one is a radiator I recently bought to replace the lousy baseboard in my breezeway. Second one is the one by my computer that I really enjoy when I'm on the computer. Last one I found in the barn. Stripped and repainted it and need to get it back in it's original location. Once the warm weather comes. Sorry for the rant. Bedtime. Matt
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DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Visit Lehigh Anthracite