Fuel sure makes a differance

Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: Short Bus On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:40 pm

Fortunately we are not supposed to have alcohol in our fuels in Alaska. I started up my new snowmobile, two stroke, 550cc, carbureted, it had been parked for about five weeks, it was not running great but I figured just needed to limber up some. I never fuel out of gas cans at home, I hate water, so I went over to my local USA gas station. They have been having problems lately getting fuel and all they have is supreme, I filled up, and went for a fifty mile ride. Machine ran poorly for the whole ride, would barely idle, it also had a raw fuel smell any time I stopped or started out. Swung by the Chevron on the way home, I was amazed I had burned over seven gallons in fifty miles. On the way home machine started to get a lot peppier, I pegged the throttle at one end of the airstrip and wow it was back, and at home the idle was working fine. I'm not sure whose fuel I started out with but it will be Chevron from now on.
Short Bus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Kewanee boiler with Anchor stoker
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut / Sub-bituminous C
Other Heating: Propane wall furnace back up only

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 10:50 pm

We just got ethanol free fuel in town a few months ago. It is 91 octane not true high test but w/o ethanol it is the best. I have spent soo much time treating fuel for my 4 strokes that do not get used much :mad: I have used the new fuel all winter in the snow blower it runs like a new machine. Folks just do not understand the value of fuel that does not require carb rebuilds every few years not to mention fuel lines. I do still treat all my fuel with Sta-bil. Years ago my Dad was on a decline and not up to par, and always said I will be going fishing after I left :cry: He never went without me after that, and I dealt with bad gas that one trip. After that I would treat the gas with Sta-bil and fog the engine on my terms, never another failure. We did fish for a few years after I took over, thank God. Remember that boat sat out in the Florida sun for 365 days a year with only a canvas cover. When you base a 2 week a year vacation in Florida, it is key your boat motor always works when you show up, as mine/Dads did. Dad is gone but that motor still works like a jem today. Dad did not have to deal with the crap gas we all deal with today.
I still miss him after writing this, it has been 10 years Wow time flies buy :shock:
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:58 am

We still don't have a non ethanol fuel source here but having replaced the catalytic converter in my cars a couple of times I'll be switching to it as soon as it becomes available. Plus I hate the idea of using a major food source as a fuel; that makes no sense to me.

It's poor planning and something I think we'll come to regret. It's already caused the cost of any food with corn in it to raise and what doesn't have corn in it to some extent. Take care, Lisa

PS. Shortbus, the travel agent is having us look at Fairbanks as a stop on our Alaskan tour next year. What's there to see and do there that makes a stop worth the time and cost?
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea


Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: Short Bus On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 10:51 am

I always considered Fairbanks to be a flat Midwestern town, until I got to the Midwest and realize it is only flat relative to the rest of Alaska. Temperatures in Fairbanks can climb to 95 degrees, and on the longest day of the year they play a baseball game all night, without lights on the field. The Alaska railroad terminates in Fairbanks and you could take the train about 450 miles to the coast. Fairbanks was originally accessed by river boat from the bearing sea, so they have a replica sternwheeler doing about a ten mile tour. The Alaska pipeline is about ten miles out of town. I understand at least one of the old bucket line gold dredges can be toured, I think that is in Fox, near the pipline. If I was visiting Fairbanks I would probably try to be there on the longest day of the year.

Touring Alaska is like trying to visit an area from Florida to Louisiana up to Illinois and east to Virginia, with a total population of less than a big city. Probably should sort of concentrate on one area and enjoy that.
Short Bus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Kewanee boiler with Anchor stoker
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut / Sub-bituminous C
Other Heating: Propane wall furnace back up only

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 11:01 am

Short Bus wrote:I always considered Fairbanks to be a flat Midwestern town, until I got to the Midwest and realize it is only flat relative to the rest of Alaska. Temperatures in Fairbanks can climb to 95 degrees, and on the longest day of the year they play a baseball game all night, without lights on the field. The Alaska railroad terminates in Fairbanks and you could take the train about 450 miles to the coast. Fairbanks was originally accessed by river boat from the bearing sea, so they have a replica sternwheeler doing about a ten mile tour. The Alaska pipeline is about ten miles out of town. I understand at least one of the old bucket line gold dredges can be toured, I think that is in Fox, near the pipline. If I was visiting Fairbanks I would probably try to be there on the longest day of the year.

Touring Alaska is like trying to visit an area from Florida to Louisiana up to Illinois and east to Virginia, with a total population of less than a big city. Probably should sort of concentrate on one area and enjoy that.


Thanks, that sort of confirms my outsider's impression of Fairbanks. I don't remember ever hearing about anything going on there. It seems sort of like going to Fargo, ND. The journey there is the real adventure. Thanks for getting back with me, Take care, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: SMITTY On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 12:01 pm

That ethanol loves water - it absorbs so much of it, it separates and sinks to the bottom of the tank, and float bowls. Must've got a batch of fuel that had some in there. Sounds like you had a bunch of the separated water/ethanol mixed in with the fuel. Will run SUPER lean, and misfire as a result of that ... and the fact water don't burn very well - that accounts for the crappy mileage. Bouncing around on the trail mixes the water in little bubbles all over the place, so it takes longer than it should to run it through - once you sucked the last of it through, it ran mint.

Got a rototiller here with the same problem, only it won't start .... because the fuel is 50% + water. I'll probably have 100 pieces of equipment here over the course of the year with the same issues. The last 5 years have been the worst ever ...

No choice in MA, unless you buy ethanol free VP Racing fuel at the local lawn & garden store .... for about $15/gallon for a 5 gallon pail .... more for lesser amounts ... :shock:
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: Dennis On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 4:10 pm

Yesterday I started a chainsaw that has been sitting on the shelf since about 1995 with the same gas,I choked it and pulled about 10-15 times and fired and ran perfect.You can't let this new gas set more than a few mounths without tearing the carb apart and cleaning the gunk from every orfice
Dennis
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: AHS/WOC55-multi-fuel/wood,oil,coal
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/stove size

Re: Fuel sure makes a differance

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 4:24 pm

This is probably old & dumb--which I can surely relate to--anything I put up for the winter--lawn tractors, weed-whackers, actually everything anymore--I put half a lil jug of dry gas in them in the fall & I've never had a problem in the spring--nor had to do a carb rebuild--course none of my equipment is new--far from it:)--yes, our local gas does have ethanol in it--just sayin what works for me
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix