Coal Bin Designs

Coal Bin Designs

PostBy: mojobe44 On: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:24 am

I'm thinking about building a coal bin in order to store a triaxle load (~22 tons) of nut anthracite. I was thinking about using cinder block and mortar as a method. Anyone have suggestions based on your experience?
mojobe44
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark II
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Anthracite
Other Heating: Oil

Re: Coal Bin Designs

PostBy: lzaharis On: Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:15 am

You wil be way ahead using the precast mafia blocks 2 foot by 2 foot by 8 foot long and making your bin that way as the pressure alone from dumping would be enough to blow out a wall if the bin is narrow-being less than 12 feet wide.

Making it sixteen wide by eight foot deep by six foot high will save you a lot of issues.

All you will need is some of Warps heavy silo tarping for the floor of the bin and a roof of some type..

Locally the blocks are 50 and tax plus delivery of 135 an hour for a truck and depressed center trailer and you unload them with a hired back hoe than can lift and move two tons.
Last edited by lzaharis on Wed Mar 19, 2014 11:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
lzaharis
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Switzer
Stove/Furnace Model: CWW100 100,000 btu

Re: Coal Bin Designs

PostBy: top top On: Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:17 am

Yea, unsupported block walls would blow out. I built a bin using PT 4x4 posts set in concrete on 3 ft centers, planked with PT 2x6 lumber. Back corners are interlocked. 12'x28'x6' high, tarp on the ground and stapled to the walls. Left some slack in the tarp so the staples wouldn't pull out when the truck backed in. When the tractor trailer dumped 24 ton nut size, the coal spread the entire 28' length and the walls splayed out a good bit. I wanted to backfill around the outside with dirt before the delivery to shore up the walls, but didn't get it done. I used my loader to pile up the coal in the back, then used some cables and turnbuckles across the top to keep it from spreading further. The bin is big enough to hold two loads if I were to close off the end and load it with the tractor. No roof on the bin, I bring the coal inside with 4.5 gallon buckets. A few times we had to move a couple shovels of snow to get to the coal, not a big deal here because snow doesn't usually last too long. In a colder area I would run some 2x4 lumber across the top for support and tarp it. Hang plastic bottles filled with water off the grommets to keep the tarp taught. Like using rubber tarp straps but way cheaper, plus they won't lose their tension over time like the rubber straps do. Safer too, lots of people have lost an eye to the rubber straps. Hang the bottles with rope and use u shaped nails over the rope to allow the water bottle to move vertically but not be blown around by the wind.
top top
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiac Hand Fired with hopper.