How do I heat a Split Level Home??

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:07 pm

You certainly don't NEED cast iron baseboard. Regular old slant fin baseboard will work well. That's what most people have.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:08 pm

Also, you could run PEX tubing throughout the house, that would be easy to snake through the walls and floors. You could even do sub floor radiant heat where you can get under the bedroom floors from the garage ceiling.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: ShawninNY On: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:25 pm

I envisioned using pex also , I would still keep in garage store, fuel elsewhere . Easy to clean up and store coal providing you don't need , having a warm space under the bedrooms will definitely help , good luck in what you choose
ShawninNY
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Waterford/penn royal in garage
Stove/Furnace Model: 1994 Erin


Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Thu Mar 27, 2014 4:20 pm

Check regulations locally, they might not allow you to have a solid fuel combustion unit in the garage with a gasoline powered vehicle !! I do not understand the ones who want to do a garage install when current furnace is in the basement ,installing coal boiler/furnace in the basement should simplify the project. Baseboard...... you already have floor space taken up with the electric baseboard,go with cast iron radiators,they are more vertical requiring less floor space. You do have the option to expand the hot air duct work to the parts that do not currently have duct work,if that is more feasible & lower cost for you & then just go with a hot air furnace.
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: chimley On: Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:28 pm

I'm liking the thought of expanding the duct work more than adding radiators

Then I can keep electric baseboard for backup.....like if I go away for a few days and the wife don't want to dump coal on the fire
chimley
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 1980 DF 520

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: Hambden Bob On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 6:37 am

Keeping existing as a back up makes sense. If a Storm knocks out power,well with electric BB that's another story. You had an outstanding unit at your previous home. Coal/Oil Combo makes sense. Ductwork with a Hotwater Coil would be something to think of,fer sure. Hey,what the Hell,you moved and now you've got to take care of the issue. Now's a Great Time and Hat's Off to you for not waiting till the Fall! :up:
Hambden Bob
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman 1998 Magnum Stoker
Coal Size/Type: Rice-A-Roni !

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: Sting On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 6:59 am

chimley wrote:Then I can keep electric baseboard for backup.....like if I go away for a few days and the wife don't want to dump coal on the fire


Some of the wisest words written in these threads all month!
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: plumb-r On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:14 am

If your putting in central a/c with new ducts why not use the ducts, either pipe the stove or furnace in to the duct work or if you end up with a boiler use a hot water to air coil in the duct work. If a garage install is what you really want, consider framing a room in the back corner of the garage, self-closing steel door and fresh air make up piped to the room and your heating appliance is no longer in the garage. Keep it simple, if your budget doesn't allow for the boiler in the basement with all the bells and whistles, there are other ways. None of this is cheap, but some ways are way more expensive than others. Do a lot of reading first then decide whats best for you! :gee:
plumb-r
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 608 Energy Master I Stoker

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: blrman07 On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 9:06 am

Keep something for a backup just in case. I kept my oil boiler hooked up and this winter I was glad I did. I caught an incredibly nasty case of the flu putting me flat on my back in bed for three days. Double vision the whole 9 yards. I unplugged the stoker and went to bed. My wife is not physically able to handle the coal or ashes so it sat for 5 days until I could get it started again. It was the middle of winter and if we had not had the oil boiler as a backup we would have had a very big problem.

Always have a backup installed in place, not just a plan. You never know what is going to happen.

Rev. Larry
New Beginning Church
Ashland Pa.
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, reblacking a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: tjnamtiw On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:28 am

Your house is crying out for a mini-split heat pump system with multiple zones. While I don't have such a system, I have been avidly researching them after talking on another forum to those that do. These systems are the latest development in heat pumps with SEER ratings up into the mid and high 20's and heat ratings that are capable of their rated btu's at temperatures as low as -5F.
There is one outside unit that feeds inside units for each room or area. The inside units can be wall mounted style, floor mounted, or even mounted in a suspended ceiling! Seriously consider this, do some research and get some quotes.
Of course, this is a coal forum so I should also say that when I lived in Pa, I had a split level house and I put a free standing coal burner in the lower lever, the family room. I put a large ceiling grate in that allowed the hot air to go up into the bedrooms above. My house always stayed in the mid 70's with no problems. Ceiling grates CAN be an insurance question, especially if they don't have the fusible link to close them in case of a fire.

Good luck.
tjnamtiw
 
Other Heating: Sopka Cook stove

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 11:43 am

Install a coal burning heat system & be warm, install a heat pump system & wish you were warm,..... lots of difference between those 2 scenarios. A heat pump might be ok for South Carolina.Georgia & Florida, but will not be satisfactory & WARM in central Pa. & north further,and when deregulation hits high gear the electric bill will make you wish for the coal burning system.
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: tjnamtiw On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 3:50 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:Install a coal burning heat system & be warm, install a heat pump system & wish you were warm,..... lots of difference between those 2 scenarios. A heat pump might be ok for South Carolina.Georgia & Florida, but will not be satisfactory & WARM in central Pa. & north further,and when deregulation hits high gear the electric bill will make you wish for the coal burning system.


You're absolutely right about the cost of electricity 'necessarily skyrocketing' thanks to the fools who voted for He Who Shall Not Be Named in ALL of the NE states! The question from the OP though was for his particular situation, how would he best heat his house, which is really stretched out in 3 dimensions. He's using electric BASEBOARD heat now which is unGodly expensive! The mini-splits would slash that bill tremendously plus give him AC in the summer with SEER's in the 18-26 range. You'll also find a lot of people up your way as far as Canada now have heat pumps.

Without a doubt, the best solution from a cost standpoint would be coal if the dang EPA and their puppet masters don't kill it. Also, he would need a distribution system to heat his entire house.
tjnamtiw
 
Other Heating: Sopka Cook stove

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Fri Mar 28, 2014 4:11 pm

Well, I do not know electric rates for Shamokin,Pa. but our rates here at 7.75 cents/kw are far less than to heat with oil or propain. A coal furnace/boiler would be able to heat the entire house & do it well,unlike a dual system ... heat pump/air conditioner. If you need a air conditioner buy one,need heat ,install a coal burner,we all know that dual purpose things are generally a compromise someway or other,they either do 1 thing well & the other poorly or do both half way. You can pull a long trailer with an F350 ,but to do serious hauling with a long trailer capable of hauling a lot of weight/bulk you would buy a semi-tractor for its purpose designed job,same goes for heating & cooling...do it right or wish you had after spending lots of $$$$$. Yes even people in Canada are being ripped off with heat pumps,if you want to have WARM air they ain't the answer.
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: How do I heat a Split Level Home??

PostBy: Scottaw On: Sat Apr 05, 2014 9:12 am

I agree with the mini split being a great option here. I went 2 winters with just mini splits in central PA and we were warm. Now I keep the mini splits as backup to my coal, and their fans really help move the heat around. Modern mini splits are amazing pieces of engineering that will work to well below zero, and don't cost much to run. And, they will be the AC that you've been considering as well.

I can let my coal go out and heat completely electric which is what I'm doing now in the shoulder seasons, I burn coal for that super toasty warmth in the butter cold. I let it go out because I was out of town for a weekend and my wife didn't want to bother with coal.
Scottaw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93