Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Lightning On: Wed Apr 02, 2014 5:07 pm

Well fellas, Its getting to be that time of year.. The shoulder month into spring. I'm happy to see it finally coming in! :D This is the tricky time of the season for operating a hand fed. Keeping draft in the chimney and at the same time not heating yourself out of the house or burning an excessive amount of coal to keep her alive. I like the challenge of it haha.. Today is a good example, currently 58 degrees outside and I've got the Clayton down to a cool simmer with 74 in the house. My fire is nearly in suspended animation and has been since this morning, about 10 hours. Last shake and load was 22 hours ago. It's running so cool that the snap disk mounted on top the air jacket won't hit 115 degrees to turn the blowers on. Only warm slow gravity fed air is circulating thru the duct work during days like this. I keep her going thru the day so I can revive her later for night time heating..

-.01 to -.02 on the manometer
192 over the load door
122 degrees on the pipe


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195 degrees just under the load door.
This is all the primary air she is getting right now.
The spinner is closed. Just a sliver open on the other primary air control.

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And here is what makes this coal stunt doable. Extra secondary air. This opening leads into the secondary air pipes I installed. There is one on each side of the load door. The extra secondary air flows in over the coal bed, gets heated and goes up my outside block chimney to keep the tiny amount draft flowing the right way while at the same time pulling just enough primary air in to keep her alive.

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From now till May I'll do the 24 hour shake and load with a grate slice and poke in between. Later this evening, I'll open the ash door to let her have a big breath of fresh air till her coal is burning good, then do my shake and load. I'll get her down to burning 30 pounds a day, maybe less, which is pretty good I'm thinkin for a fire box capable of holding over a 100 pounds.

By the way her name is "Ashley"..
Coal burning is so much fun!! :lol:

Yeah, yeah, I know... I'm such a coal geek... :)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Wed Apr 02, 2014 6:11 pm

Low and slow,.....time to make a batch of chili on the stove! :D
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Wed Apr 02, 2014 6:59 pm

I applaud your ability to improve a product and overcome it's engineering deficiencies. That hot blast of yours runs with the big guns. :clap: We can all lite and run a stove when it's 10* outside, now it's the physicists turn 8-)
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: KingCoal On: Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:25 pm

agreed, all i have to do is turn the Bi-metal down and shake it IF i remember :D

right now the bi-metal is on 2.5 the hottest spot on the stove top is 250*, the same spot on the pipe is 100* and i'm pulling .04 with 1" blues scattered around. house is 73*
KingCoal
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DSM 1400, Riteway # 37, Comforter Stove Works
Coal Size/Type: Nut Anth.
Other Heating: none
Stove/Furnace Model: 2013 1400 Circulator

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: JohnB On: Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:38 pm

With outside temps just hitting 60° I've kept the Hitzer between 190°-200° all day with the bi-metal control off & the front vent just cracked open. .025-.035 on the manometer & 100° on the flue pipe measured 2" out from the stove. The house has stayed a nice tee shirt comfortable 72.5° all day.
JohnB
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Hitzer 50-93

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Lightning On: Sat Apr 12, 2014 5:36 pm

How low can you go??!!
117 on the pipe
174 over the load door
-.01 on the man
Combustion air at a sliver :)

Dam sideways pictures haha..
Too many Keystone Lights :lol:
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Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sat Apr 12, 2014 7:25 pm

When I came down stairs this morning.

Kitchen was 75 degrees.

Only two of five primary air openings were open = .045 gap each.

102 degrees on the pipe - three feet up from the stove top.

.005 on the mano.

Stayed warm enough last night that it didn't need any check draft opening to slow it down.

The kettle was just below a boil, and the two top covers over the fire box were in the 600 degree range - perfect for cooking break fast ! :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Apr 13, 2014 7:55 am

That's awesome!..
Gonna hit 78 here today but I'm idling thru for the 40's coming on Tuesday.
Then 14 degrees on Tuesday night!
:wtf:
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:13 am

After re-sealing much of the stove, it will idle down much better now. 8-)

Plus, having the choice of flue paths built into the range gives me more control over how much of the stove gets to radiate heat, and how much heat stays in the stove, or gets sent to the chimney to maintain draft, or using the check damper to let room air to slow the draft and the stove when not cooking.

Keeping it running when it's in the 70's outside is no problem.

And, coal is much cheaper to cook with than the pro-pain of my kitchen gas stove, so the longer we keep the coal range running the more I save. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:18 am

Sunny Boy wrote:Plus, having the choice of flue paths built into the range gives me more control over how much of the stove gets to radiate heat, and how much heat stays in the stove, or gets sent to the chimney to maintain draft, or using the check damper to let room air to slow the draft and the stove when not cooking.

Keeping it running when it's in the 70's outside is no problem.


NIce! Warm weather burning is a method of strategy.
Love it!!

:ugeek: :rockon:
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 13, 2014 1:02 pm

It's also a method to extend the savings, by not having to use expensive fuels to do the same job of cooking. ;)

Now Lee, you just need to figure out how to put a cook top on that Clayton, . . . :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Warm Weather Burning in a Hand Fed

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:09 pm

Another option came into use today. Being able to change coal size to adapt to the weather.

It got up to 80 here this afternoon and windy. The range was still doing fine, but with the wind gusting so, rather than open the dampers more, or risk a draft reversal, I switched over from using nut coal to the larger stove coal. The slightly faster burn rate of the stove coal was all the boost the range needed to not be overpowered by wind gusts while running at such low damper settings.

And even with that, the kitchen stayed at 75 degrees - cooler than outside.

Part of the reason was, being able to shut off the flues to the water reservoir end of the range. That turns that water tank jacket into a heat shield of sorts for the entire right end of the stove. And, by shielding the right end of the stove and sending more heat to the stove pipe to keep the draft strong, the range can be run with less primary damper opening preventing over-heating the kitchen.

Those old timers knew a thing or two when they built these old ranges. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves