Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: wnycoalier On: Fri May 02, 2014 12:33 pm

I came across a Russo CW2 coal stove. Grates were looking barely fired. As I put it together I can only guess what to do with the steel baffle plates. But then searching I see i need side firebricks at $130 a piece plus shipping. I'm thinking Id rather scrap the stove and part out the grates and glass and pan then dump 300 into the stove just to see if it puts out enough heat and then to a heavy sanding and painting as a parlor heater on the super cold ones.

Anyone cast those sidebricks with success?
wnycoalier
 
Stove/Furnace Make: alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: channing iii?, keystoker 60?

Re: Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: blrman07 On: Fri May 02, 2014 12:42 pm

Check out this post.

Fire Brick Questions
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: installing a VC 2310
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: Woody7734 On: Sat May 03, 2014 6:31 pm

I'm in the process of making new, custom-sized firebricks to reline two used Tempcoal stoves I just bought.
I finished the forms for the firebricks today.

I resorted to making my own because I couldn't find (or order) the large sizes I need locally or online. I would have preferred to cut down larger firebricks to size, if I could find them. Here's some info, If you decide to make your own too:

I'll be using Rutland Castable Refractory (rated for 2200 F) to make mine. It's available in pail two sizes: 12.5 lbs (#600) and 25 lbs (#601). It's mixed with water and does not need heat to cure full strength, like most other refractory mixes do. I will dry out the unmolded finished bricks at room temperature for 5 days and then in our oven at 170 F for 6-8 hours, then 250 F for 4 hours, finishing with 2 hours at 400 F. This is to drive out any residual moisture in the firebericks.

12.5 lbs will make the equivilant of one firebrick 12" x 12" x 1-1/4" thick. The lowest price I've found (including shipping) is on Amazon, especially if you buy it in the 25 lb pail (with free 2-day "Prime" shipping, if you have a "Prime" membership on Amazon). I couldn't find it stocked locally.

I will also be mixing in 10 ounces (per each 12.5 lbs of Rutland's mix) of 1" long, special stainless steel needles (designed for reinforcing refractory mixes) to help prevent cracking and wearing out of the finished firebrick. It supposedly triples the life of the firebrick. The source I found for the small quantity of the needles was on Ebay...10 pounds for $20, plus shipping.

I did the math and found that my homemade firebricks (minus the needles) will weigh the same as the originals, so they are the same density brick that Tempcoal used.
Last edited by Woody7734 on Sun May 04, 2014 6:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
Woody7734
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tempcoal & Tempcoal 2

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Re: Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: Lightning On: Sat May 03, 2014 10:34 pm

I used the rutland to make a rear liner in the back of my furnace. It got thru most of the season but cracked in two places and eroded pretty bad. Not sure if there might be a better choice of refractory cement or if the failure was pilot error.. Here's the thread I documented it on.

End of Season Clean Out - Rear Liner Burn Thru Clayton
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: Woody7734 On: Sun May 04, 2014 8:10 am

Lightning wrote:I used the rutland to make a rear liner in the back of my furnace. It got thru most of the season but cracked in two places and eroded pretty bad. Not sure if there might be a better choice of refractory cement or if the failure was pilot error.. Here's the thread I documented it on.

End of Season Clean Out - Rear Liner Burn Thru Clayton


Lightning - You did one helluva job on your firebrick casting...it looked great!

From what I've read on the web (mostly from those that make their own forges & foundries from castable refractory mixes) I've learned there are a few things that others say can cause poor longevity of homemade Rutland firebrick. They're usually related to water, such as:

1. The mix was "too wet" (use less water - but never more - than Rutland recommends). Better results seem to come from mixing it to a soft clay or putty consistency and pressing it into the mold, rather than something close to a "pourable" or loose consistency. You should be able to make a "snowball" out of it and it should keep it's shape if you toss it an inch or two in the air and catch it in your hand several times. Because I've never mixed any before, I have no idea how wet Rutland's recommended water amount makes the mix. Wetter mixes usually make weaker firebrick that crack easier and wear away faster from abrasion.

2. A rough textured surface should be obvious after screeding the mix level in the form...similar to concrete block. A drier mix should allow this. The surface should not be troweled or made smooth because it hinders the evaporation of moisture from the brick (even when slowly dried with heat). Trapped moisture in the firebrick can cause cracking, spalling & blistering when exposed to the higher temperatures of burning wood or coal. Several small, low heat fires after installation are recommended...even after the firebricks have been slowly dried out in an oven.

3. The addition of stainless steel refractory needles greatly improves cracking and abrasion resistance.

4. Supposedly, properly cured firebrick don't expand when heated in a firebox... or if they do, it's very, very slight. Sometimes cracks are caused by something else (surrounding metal?) that expands against the firebrick and puts pressure on it. In my project I will leave about 1/8" gap around the firebrick edges, at the metal walls of the firebox.

We'll see how this info works out in my project. This is advice others have shared from their experiences, so it's the method I'm going to use.
Woody7734
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tempcoal & Tempcoal 2

Re: Russo side coal bricks missing in new stove, any hacks?

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun May 04, 2014 8:24 am

Woody7734 wrote:Lightning - You did one helluva job on your firebrick casting...it looked great!

Thanks! :) Yes, I do remember the mix being a little on the wet side. Good luck with your project! Please post pics, I'm sure others can learn from your experience... :D
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

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