Lighting Harman Magnfire

Re: COAL BIN Pics

PostBy: elvinpw On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:41 pm

Linc wrote:2- 40# bags in 3 days is not bad at all. That's less than 30# a day. Does the fire just go out or is there nothing but ash left in the firebox?


Pretty much nothing left but a few quartz looking stones and maybe 2-3 little pea nut pieces of coal. So, is the quartz like stuff what they call "clinkers"? Thanks for the feedback. So, I take it 30#/day isn't bad, then.

Thanks a lot for the feedback!
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:02 pm

Clinkers look like melted together rocks, pieces of coal, and brown glass.
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LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: elvinpw On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:30 pm

LsFarm wrote:Hello elvin, welcome to the forum. As you have learned, coal takes patience, and technique. Once you get it figured out, you will really love the fuel.

For the barometric damper. Use the 'rough' scale on the 'V' bracket, set it at .04-.05". You will be in the ballpark.. anything in that area will work with a hand feed stove. Right now with the weight all the way back you probably are near a .09-.12" wc, way too much draft.

You can control your stove will just the spinner draft control on the ashpan door, but with a baro installed the chimney draft will be much more consistant, making using the spinner draft easier and more predictable.

Like you have learned, just get a fire going, add some coal, keep the under fire draft open, let the coal get glowing, then fill 'er up.

As for not making it through the night, are you FILLING the firebox?? I mean a mound in the middle, with the edges of the coal pile up to the top of the firebrick?? You cannot add too much coal... coal burns from the bottom up, and your spinner knob controls this air to the fire... So fill 'er up.

Then, you will need to experiment, because every house, stove, chimney and their interactions are different. If your house is really tight, it will be harder for your chimney to draw air out of the house through the coal bed.. If you house is drafty, then you will have to turn the spinner knob down more to control the heat output from the stove. And this will also control the rate of coal use from the stove too..

You want to find a comfortable 'idle' setting for your spinner draft knob.[I'll guess around 1/2 to 3/4 turn out, depends on chimney and house] This is an amount of air that will keep the fire going, not going out for lack of air, but not creating a lot of heat either, next you need to find the 'really cooking' setting, [I'll guess around 3 turns out, again depends on chimney and house]. This is the setting you would use to warm the house up after you had it idling for the day. This setting will give you hot but not dangerous stove body and flue temps.. Other members with the same stove will chime in with these numbers, but I'd go with stove body, not over ~550-650*, flue pipe [outside of pipe] ~300* Again, these are rough numbers. You will have to develope a feel for what you are comfortable with.

Once you find your idle and full out settings, you can experiment with what gives you 'X' hours of burn with 'X' setting... Write it down. You may remember the settings this season, but will appreciate the list next year.

The weather changes most of these settings.. really cold windy weather will create more draft, so less air is needed, this difference will be less with the baro set properly. really warm weather will lessen the draft, you will figure it all out.


Take care, I hope the above helps some...

Greg L

.

LsFarm wrote:Clinkers look like melted together rocks, pieces of coal, and brown glass.
Clinker.jpg

clinker3.jpg

clinker4.jpg
rberq wrote:Hello, elvinpw. Three things jumped out at me from your posts.
(1) baro adjustment - LsFarm covered that - as long as you have it leveled and plumbed you can set it pretty well without the manometer.
(2) filling the firebox completely to make it burn overnight - LsFarm covered that too.
(3) Emptied the ash box only twice in three days - that seems too little considering how much coal your burned - every time I have congratulated myself on how little ash I had, it turned out I had not shaken down enough. With my Harman, I shake twice daily and I have to empty the ash bin twice daily. I start shaking with fairly long strokes to drop out the large quantity of ash at the bottom, then go to short choppy strokes to vibrate out the ash but not to dump too much burning coal. But I always shake until I have SOME red burning coal in the ash pit. Then I look at the underside of the grates and if there's a lot of dark in some areas I poke up from the bottom with a bent metal rod to help clear the ashes that didn't drop. I like to see some red glow through the grates distributed fairly evenly over maybe 15 or 20 percent of the grate openings. Then I reload and go away for another 12 hours.


Apparently I've NOT been shaking it down enough. I have been using really short choppy shakes [only 1-2 inches throw] so as NOT to drop much through the grates. But I'll try your technique. I'll also look up through the grates for hangers. Didn't realize it was okay to drop a few hot coals into the pan. Great advice. TWELVE HOURS!!! Wow! I'm impressed. Can't wait to get to that point! [Not really I'm kinda having fun playing with all this!] :-)
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

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Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: elvinpw On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:34 pm

LsFarm wrote:Clinkers look like melted together rocks, pieces of coal, and brown glass.
Clinker.jpg

clinker3.jpg

clinker4.jpg



Ah! Picture's worth a thousand words! So . . . . . THAT's a clinker . . . . . Thanks. :-)

Still haven't figured out how to upload pix. I have some of the stove, and the illustrious blue flame everyone on here talks about. Makes a great nite lite! :-)
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: COAL BIN Pics

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:52 pm

elvinpw wrote:
Rick 386 wrote:Elvin,

You have a Graingers store located down the road from you in Portland. You can order the Dwyer Model 25 from them. It is item # 2T650

If they have it in stock you can pick it up directly or have them ship it to you. Then you can set the draft and have the ability to constantly monitor it.

I picked up my own last Friday from the local store. They had a couple of them.


Rick


Hey thanks Rick for the tip! I've already looked them up on "anywho" and found them on Warren Ave in Portland. Know RIGHT where they are. Ony thing, is that they list themselves as "wholesalers" and sometimes those people get a little squirrely when a mere mortal tries to give them money. I'm all over it! Thanks a lot for the lead! :-)


Grainger sells business to business only, if you don't have a business ID they won't sell to you. I have a small business, I've used them for years. BTW their prices on a lot of items are a little on the high side, but their advantage is they have what you need and if they don't have it they will get it fast.

If you go to the Field Controls website you can locate distributors near you for the RC damper, also available in jet-setting stylish black as model RCBT, but you might have to order that one.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: COAL BIN Pics

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:05 pm

elvinpw wrote:The first light I was a bit nervous and it took me about a 1/2 day to summon the courage to actually LITE the thing.
My stack temp, measured about 2 feet up from the back of the stove rose to about 350 degrees, and my stove temp was about 550 degrees approaching 575!


I know the feeling, that uneasy sensation in the pit of the stomach, hands slightly trembling....beads of sweat forming on the forehead.
No problem, my stove runs 175 to 300 surface mounted thermometer on the stack all the time. Last week I forgot to close the ash door and when I smelled the paint on the pipes starting to smoke and closed the door it was up over 600.

It sounds like you are doing everything right. Just takes a little time and patience. Trust me on this, I know.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: COAL BIN Pics

PostBy: elvinpw On: Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:30 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:
elvinpw wrote:The first light I was a bit nervous and it took me about a 1/2 day to summon the courage to actually LITE the thing.
My stack temp, measured about 2 feet up from the back of the stove rose to about 350 degrees, and my stove temp was about 550 degrees approaching 575!


I know the feeling, that uneasy sensation in the pit of the stomach, hands slightly trembling....beads of sweat forming on the forehead.
No problem, my stove runs 175 to 300 surface mounted thermometer on the stack all the time. Last week I forgot to close the ash door and when I smelled the paint on the pipes starting to smoke and closed the door it was up over 600.

It sounds like you are doing everything right. Just takes a little time and patience. Trust me on this, I know.



Yep. Hands slightly trembling, beads of sweat dripping down your legs as you see the paint steaming and wait for it to combust. Inside you're saying to yourself, "It's fine." This is FINE. No problem . . . Everything's under control . . . . Nothing to worry about . . . . . [size=200]HELP!!![/size]

Thanks for your feedback! :-)
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: bugize On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:10 pm

:shock: welcome to the forum elvin,
how is your burning goin? once you get the hang of burning coal you will love your stove. just a tip,if you have wood burning buddies come over,dont let them talk you into poking the coals like they do with wood...the poke and rake...this will upset a coal fire.
i have heated with wood most of my life and coal is by far better,for me anyways,to heat with i wish i done it earlier,this is my second year. i work a rotating swing shift and my fire is sometimes going 15 hrs between tendings and throwing heat still after 15 hrs.
i have my thermometer on my stove pipe 10-12 inches above the elbow on the back of the stove.when calling for more heat on our coldest days...i run my draft knob no more than 1 3/4 turns out and my stack temps are around 275-300.
i try to keep the stack temp below 300 only because it seems more than that ,i am sending heat up the flue and using alot more coal than need be. today for instance i have it 1 turn out my temp is about 200 and the house is 78...too hot for me but the g/f is compfy.
i shake until i see a glow from the coal bed in the ash pan,i empty my ashes once a day. you dont have to worry about creosote either,my stove has been running,non stop since the monday after thanksgiving.its kinda relieving to see the oil trucks going by the house to deliever to the others on my road. keep a note either on paper or in your head on outside temps,stack temps and where your running your draft knob. i usually check the forecast and set my draft accordingly,if temps are to be in the teens and low 20's...i set it to 1 1/4 turns out,this will give me stack temps between 200-225 and my house 74-76,BUT....each setup is different.i hope some of this helps you figure out the hand fed coal stove world. we are a barbaric bunch....some may even call us knuckle draggers.... :lol: :o .but for me its turned into kind of a practical hobby actually. :shock:
bugize
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark3

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: rberq On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:39 pm

Elvin, someone mentioned finding a Field Controls RC baro damper supplier. I got mine from F. W. Webb on Leighton Road in Augusta -- not TOO far from you. The other big supplier I know about in Augusta is Redlon and Johnson on State Street, but they have a big sign out front "NO RETAIL, NO EXCEPTIONS". Damned unfriendly if you ask me. Webb was happy to sell to me. The sales people call it a "draft control" and were flustered for a minute when I asked for a "barometric damper". Probably a good idea to call them before you make the drive to make sure they have the right one in stock -- I think it comes in 6, 7, and 8-inch flavors.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: elvinpw On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 10:09 pm

bugize wrote::shock: welcome to the forum elvin,
how is your burning goin? once you get the hang of burning coal you will love your stove. just a tip,if you have wood burning buddies come over,dont let them talk you into poking the coals like they do with wood...the poke and rake...this will upset a coal fire.
i have heated with wood most of my life and coal is by far better,for me anyways,to heat with i wish i done it earlier,this is my second year. i work a rotating swing shift and my fire is sometimes going 15 hrs between tendings and throwing heat still after 15 hrs.
i have my thermometer on my stove pipe 10-12 inches above the elbow on the back of the stove.when calling for more heat on our coldest days...i run my draft knob no more than 1 3/4 turns out and my stack temps are around 275-300.
i try to keep the stack temp below 300 only because it seems more than that ,i am sending heat up the flue and using alot more coal than need be. today for instance i have it 1 turn out my temp is about 200 and the house is 78...too hot for me but the g/f is compfy.
i shake until i see a glow from the coal bed in the ash pan,i empty my ashes once a day. you dont have to worry about creosote either,my stove has been running,non stop since the monday after thanksgiving.its kinda relieving to see the oil trucks going by the house to deliever to the others on my road. keep a note either on paper or in your head on outside temps,stack temps and where your running your draft knob. i usually check the forecast and set my draft accordingly,if temps are to be in the teens and low 20's...i set it to 1 1/4 turns out,this will give me stack temps between 200-225 and my house 74-76,BUT....each setup is different.i hope some of this helps you figure out the hand fed coal stove world. we are a barbaric bunch....some may even call us knuckle draggers.... :lol: :o .but for me its turned into kind of a practical hobby actually. :shock:
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: elvinpw On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 10:37 pm

bugize wrote::shock: welcome to the forum elvin,
how is your burning goin? once you get the hang of burning coal you will love your stove. just a tip,if you have wood burning buddies come over,dont let them talk you into poking the coals like they do with wood...the poke and rake...this will upset a coal fire.
i have heated with wood most of my life and coal is by far better,for me anyways,to heat with i wish i done it earlier,this is my second year. i work a rotating swing shift and my fire is sometimes going 15 hrs between tendings and throwing heat still after 15 hrs.
i have my thermometer on my stove pipe 10-12 inches above the elbow on the back of the stove.when calling for more heat on our coldest days...i run my draft knob no more than 1 3/4 turns out and my stack temps are around 275-300.
i try to keep the stack temp below 300 only because it seems more than that ,i am sending heat up the flue and using alot more coal than need be. today for instance i have it 1 turn out my temp is about 200 and the house is 78...too hot for me but the g/f is compfy.
i shake until i see a glow from the coal bed in the ash pan,i empty my ashes once a day. you dont have to worry about creosote either,my stove has been running,non stop since the monday after thanksgiving.its kinda relieving to see the oil trucks going by the house to deliever to the others on my road. keep a note either on paper or in your head on outside temps,stack temps and where your running your draft knob. i usually check the forecast and set my draft accordingly,if temps are to be in the teens and low 20's...i set it to 1 1/4 turns out,this will give me stack temps between 200-225 and my house 74-76,BUT....each setup is different.i hope some of this helps you figure out the hand fed coal stove world. we are a barbaric bunch....some may even call us knuckle draggers.... :lol: :o .but for me its turned into kind of a practical hobby actually. :shock:


All helpful comments. Thanks!

I too work long shifts. Sometimes I work 15 hour shifts plus 20 min travel time each end. Not yet quite comfy leaving it alone that long . . yet. But I'm getting there. I'm getting maybe 8-10 hour burns thus far. But I'm learning that I am WAY underloading the box. Also, still on the list for the draft manometer. So, once I get my draft where it needs to be, I believe I'll be able to increase my burn times. But I agree totally, that this is fast becoming a fun, practical hobby. Must admit, I've always had a few pyro tendencies, and this seems to satisfy that itch. :-) I'm loving watching that beautiful blue flame, and feeling the the strong, solid heat enveloping the room.

My setup location is a little less than ideal and so my next project is to figure how to move this heat around the house. Got the stove located in the kitchen, South East corner, of the house. I've heard the "old timers" say you can't drive heat North. Any truth to that? Had it explained that toilet water always sprials [ counterclockwise??? ] in the Northern hemisphere, and [ clockwise??? ] in the Southern hemisphere. Read on here someplace that it's easier to fan COOL air INTO the HOT room rather than attempt to fan hot air OUT of the hot room. So, I'm experimenting with that.

Thanks for the feedback! Everyone on here has been unbelieveably helpful.

Cheers!

Peter
rberq wrote:Elvin, someone mentioned finding a Field Controls RC baro damper supplier. I got mine from F. W. Webb on Leighton Road in Augusta -- not TOO far from you. The other big supplier I know about in Augusta is Redlon and Johnson on State Street, but they have a big sign out front "NO RETAIL, NO EXCEPTIONS". Damned unfriendly if you ask me. Webb was happy to sell to me. The sales people call it a "draft control" and were flustered for a minute when I asked for a "barometric damper". Probably a good idea to call them before you make the drive to make sure they have the right one in stock -- I think it comes in 6, 7, and 8-inch flavors.
rberq wrote:Elvin, someone mentioned finding a Field Controls RC baro damper supplier. I got mine from F. W. Webb on Leighton Road in Augusta -- not TOO far from you. The other big supplier I know about in Augusta is Redlon and Johnson on State Street, but they have a big sign out front "NO RETAIL, NO EXCEPTIONS". Damned unfriendly if you ask me. Webb was happy to sell to me. The sales people call it a "draft control" and were flustered for a minute when I asked for a "barometric damper". Probably a good idea to call them before you make the drive to make sure they have the right one in stock -- I think it comes in 6, 7, and 8-inch flavors.


WOW! Reidfield, ME!!!??? That's practically spittin' distance [as they say here in Maine] from me. I'm in Dresden. :-) I have a fair amount of family there. Been there 3-4 generations.

Already have the Baro Damper, but I'm starting to think I was sold a piece of junk that had been hanging around in the back shop. Has no real measuring device to adjust to. No "rough draft" scale. Pretty rudimentary design. But not sure I want to replace it this year. Too much of a pain to take everything apart. Perhaps next year. But I AM interested in purchasing one of those Dwyer Model 25 manometers to hook up permanently. So if you have a local supplier for those . . . . I've currently got a bid in for one on ebay, and Im looking around locally. Suppose either of those suppliers you mentioned might have these?

Another good supplier for coal pipe, hardware, stove accoutrements etc is Goslines Hardware in Farmingdale. Saw an ad in the local free weekly for metalbestos, and their prices were among the cheapest. They are EXTREMELY nice people, knowledgeable, and a couple of the guys there have coal stoves. Prices are hard to beat.

If we're that close we should meet for coffee and coal stories. Been burning coal long?

Cheers!

peter
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 10:54 pm

Another hopelessly addicted coal burner has joined the ranks!
You know it's bad when you think of ways to improve your installation and move the heat around.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Lighting Harman Magnfire

PostBy: elvinpw On: Wed Feb 06, 2008 11:06 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:Another hopelessly addicted coal burner has joined the ranks!
You know it's bad when you think of ways to improve your installation and move the heat around.


Yep. I've been bitten!

:-)
elvinpw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Visit Hitzer Stoves