Coal for my Studio?

Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: yeldogt On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 4:36 pm

Long time/ repeat lurker -- Because I keep thinking coal may be my solution.

My situation: 1750sf two building well insulated Studio in Bucks County Pennsylvania. It's my second residence -- so the studio is not occupied all the time. I currently have a 32K BTU propane heater (hot air) and two 220V electric heaters. I run the propane when I am away to maintain something around 55 and then up the propane and add in the electric to get it up to the high 60's maybe 70. My delivered propane hit almost $6 per gallon last winter :(. I'm going to be using this place a bit more for the next couple of years and expect to move permanently after that .. so some of this is planning .. I have to do something.

The previous owner (2005) used to heat the space with a wood stove. He installed the propane heater because, like me also started to use the place intermittently -- and propane was only $1. The chimney (masonry) is still there .. I love the heat from a wood stove ... but wood is pain .. especially when you have to buy it.

I'm wondering if it is unwise to try and heat with coal intermittently -- I often arrive in the evening and stay 4 or 5 days ... Will lighting become to onerous? ... will I have to clean out the cold stove each time? How fast do you begin to get heat from a coal stove?

When I read the forum -- I'm thinking an old stove like a Glenwood Basebuner is just what I need ... or should I get a new stove? The old ones are confusing -- Glenwood #6 vs #8 .. I guess the 8 is bigger? Also, is a Glenwood Oak a base burner? or something else. I could also have a small amount of wood around .. as some burn both.

The idea of a small boiler is very interesting ... but thats further down the line.
yeldogt
 

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 4:50 pm

Wow almost $6 per gallon that's insane.. it takes a couple hours to get a well established coal fire.. it will start producing heat sooner than that though..
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:11 pm

Welcome,
If your thinking Glenwood cylinder stoves, the Oaks are not base heaters.

The Modern Oaks being the most commonly found of the Oak types. They come various sizes from a #12 (12 inch fire pot), to a #114, #116, on up to the #118 which has an 18 inch diameter fire pot.

The #6 and #8 are base heaters. More efficient at burning coal and extracting the heat from it and as such, are a bit more expensive than the Oaks. The #6 has a 16 inch fire pot, the #8 an 18 inch pot.

While both types can burn wood or coal, if you burn enough wood that the stove needs cleaning often, the Oaks are better for wood. Not being base heaters they are easier to clean .

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: yeldogt On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 6:24 pm

I'm trying to figure out the stove size numbers -- and the actual dimensions of the various stoves.

Looks like the #6 is a good sized stove -- but I would like something that can put out 60k btu's without having to max it out. Also, looks as if the base burners have a longer burn ? Or am I reading too much into it ?

Not sure how are it is to find the old ones -- I would need one ready to go.


And yes -- The propane prices were crazy last year... I only have two 100 gal tanks ... so they will not last that long and I have no choice about price ... when I need it.
yeldogt
 

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: top top On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 6:57 pm

Ok, I just finished my first year with coal, so this is worth about what you paid for it. First, the propane. I also have a pair of 420's (I think that is what you called a 100 gallon tank), but I don't use much and they last me a year. So I only fill them when the price is down in the summer, about a third what you paid. Could you get a larger tank and not buy gas when the price is up?

As to choice of stove and how to light it, I can only tell you what I have. An Alaska Kodiac with hopper. I dump about 3 lbs matchlight charcoal in the center of the grate, then about 15-20 lbs nut coal on that, then hold a handheld propane torch under the grates for a minute or so to get things going. It doesn't take long until the anthracite is glowing red, then I add more coal. It takes about one hour total to bring the stove up to speed and the hopper full. If I were to leave for a week I could fill the hopper and set the 'stat, then it would heat the place for two days, after that the propane would automatically kick in. I would put a timer on the blower so it would shut down. When I came back it would be very easy and quick to shake down and empty the ash pan before laying the new fire. All of this assumes you are comfortable leaving a burning stove unattended. If not, just let it burn out before you leave and go straight to gas.
top top
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiac Hand Fired with hopper.

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: dhansen On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 7:07 pm

The layout of your studio will have a lot to do with how well you can heat with a hand fired stove. If the stove is centrally located you might do quite well but if the building rambles it will be difficult to move the heat throughout the structure.

The baseheater stoves are considered the top of the line stoves. That is, by those of us who believe stove technology peaked in the early 1900's. There are others that believe stove design has continued to improve with the passing of time, usually accompanied with additional mechanical parts and complexity. I looked at virtually every kind of coal burning device available and came to the conclusion that the simple elegance and efficiency of the older stoves couldn't be beat. I'm working on getting a Glenwood No.6 put back together so I can compare it to my Glenwood No.116. They are about the same size and potentially put out the same (more or less) BTUs. The interesting results will be how much more efficient the No.6 is in doing so. As long as I'm burning coal, you'll never find a "modern" stove in my home.

Last year was my first burning coal and we had the most comfortable winter here in Maine that we've ever had. I love the No.116 and wouldn't hesitate to recommend the same for anyone. Just a great stove even if it isn't as efficient as a No.6. We shall eventually see.......

If you haven't done so already, try watching the 6 part video done by forum member wsherrick (William) detailing the operation of his Glenwood No.6 stove. The basics are applicable to just about any hand fired cylinder stove. Image (If you are not sold on burning coal after watching these videos, stick to the propane and electricity)!

The folks here were instrumental in helping me through the learning phase of running a coal stove. It has been a hearth warming experience. I hope your s is too!

Welcome to the forum.

Dennis
Last edited by dhansen on Mon Aug 11, 2014 7:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
dhansen
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No.6 and No.116

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: sharkman8810 On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 7:15 pm

I think it is a good idea for a stove for a few days, definitely better than a wood stove for that amount of time. Most coal stoves you can burn wood in. For what your doing even a standard box coal stove would work good such as a harmon mark II, and they can be found refurbished for a pretty reasonable price.
sharkman8810
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 82 ul
Coal Size/Type: nut
Stove/Furnace Make: hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 82 u.l.

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 8:21 pm

To answer another of your questions. Since I switched to using BBQ charcoal to light my coal stove, (as many here do), it's almost as fast at producing heat output as just using wood kindling.

And, charcoal is much faster and neater/cleaner than using a wood fire to get the coal going. Plus, it doesn't leave any residue like wood does. Saves on having to clean the mica windows in the stove.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: yeldogt On: Mon Aug 11, 2014 8:54 pm

Over the years I have owned various "cabins" .... weekend places ... with wood stoves. That is why I never replaced the wood stove that the previous owner took with him. They are a lot of work collecting the wood and keeping the fire going and I don't have any "free" wood at this house.

My two buildings are both single large 1 story spaces -- one I use strictly for my studio .. the other is used as a workroom .. I store a summer car there also - so that space does not need to be as warm ... but that space has better insulation. 20' and 28' ceilings -- with fans.

Does anyone know what footprint of a #8 - I have to check the flue size -- what size do they require? He had a rather large wood stove -- I stuck a small pail into it --so it must be 8" or 10".

I did just watch the videos -- and see how they use lump charcoal ... not too keen on the kerosene.
Last edited by yeldogt on Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
yeldogt
 

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 2:42 am

Lightning wrote:Wow almost $6 per gallon that's insane..


Roughly speaking if it were coal that's $2K per ton. It might be cheaper to burn $1 bills. :rofl:
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 6:53 am

"........... Does anyone know what footprint of a #8 - I have to check the flue size -- what size do they require? He had a rather large wood stove -- I stuck a small pail into it --so it must be 8" or 10". ........"

My #6 takes up 24 inch wide, by 28 inch deep of floor space. With the #8 being larger, add at least two more inches to those. numbers.

BTW, the #8 are very rare. You'll have better luck finding a #6, or it's near twins, the Wings Best 116X, or the Harold #6.

Check with member Wilson (Skip) of "Wilson's Woodstoves" - 508-763-8941.

And you may want to check out these posts if you haven't already,
One time deal for a Glenwood Magazine
Glenwood magazine fun.
Glenwood #8 long burn

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:29 am

Check with member Wilson (Skip) of "Wilson's Woodstoves" - 508-763-8941.


..and whilst your up there keep your slimy claws off my #8. HAHAHAAHHAAHAHHAA, I slay myself.

If your building is well insulated any of the Sunny listed stoves will do just fine (BTW it's Herald as a search term and they are very rare too). Don't forget Hitzer and DS machine and many other more modern fine stoves that can be much cheaper especially used. Perhaps a cheapie to see if coal is for you and then branch out.

You don't need kero if that bothers you there are many alternatives. Spats are mandatory. :D
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: yeldogt On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:22 am

Thanks for the footprint information -- If people can heat whole houses with a #6 I should be able to heat my building. I will do some more research on what is required.
yeldogt
 

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:56 am

" ........ (BTW it's Herald as a search term and they are very rare too). .."

Opps ! Good catch Simon-thanks. Don't ya just love these new fangled auto-correct functions ? :roll:

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Coal for my Studio?

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:57 am

these new fangled auto-correct functions ?


Yes, it's called a wife.
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Visit Hitzer Stoves