Chimney Liner?

Chimney Liner?

PostBy: Guest On: Sun Nov 06, 2005 6:37 am

Im picking up my Hitzer 50-93 EZ FLO coal stove today. I have a masonary chimney and out the top I see what looks like a terracotta lip, so i gues its lined with terracotta. Do I need to have a steel liner put in or am I ready to just hook my coal stove up?

Thanks
Steve
Guest
 

PostBy: SMITTY On: Sun Nov 06, 2005 3:19 pm

I am no expert on chimneys, but having a liner is better than not having one at all. A liner will seal any potential gaps or breaks in the chimneys mortar, which will keep sparks and gasses inside---better for your home.

My coal stove vents into a very old, non-lined masonary chimney, which is also used by my oil-fired furnace. Both situations are not legal in my state (probably not any other state, either). However, being a frugal do-everything-yourselfer, I won't be doing it the "right" way until next year. I've already spent FAR too much money just to save a couple tanks of oil this winter. The chimney has a strong draft, even in warm weather with a cool chimney, so I'm not overly worried about safety issues. Plus, coal doesn't continuously shoot sparks up the chimney like wood does.

My parents burned wood for 30+ years in their house, which had a lined chimney. As a kid, I used to see that stack gauge regularly hit over 800 degrees, and they never had a chimney issue. My father climbed up there every spring and cleaned out all the creosote.

My chimney never sees more than 300 degrees. The coal vents much cooler than wood, and produces no creosote. The stove stays hotter for much longer. I love it, but it's intial cost is putting the hurt on...

With a lined chimney venting only the stove, you should be set.
SMITTY
 

PostBy: Mlou On: Sun Nov 06, 2005 9:50 pm

Steve,
Yes you should line that chimney. As Smitty mentioned the exhaust from anthracite is pretty cool, in order for draw to happen the exhaust must stay hot. Exhaust gets into an unlined block chimney and cools off very quickly. Anthracite burning produces a large level of carbon monoxide. You NEED it to draft well at lower temperatures since that is where you will be burning most of the time.
Mlou
 


PostBy: Guest On: Mon Nov 07, 2005 11:15 pm

Mlou,

Thanks and I ended up going with the used Hitzer instead of the Harman after I read your comments on it in previous posts about being the best bet for user friendlyness.

Thanks
Steve
Guest
 


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