Name That Plane

Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:00 pm

How about this one? (should be pretty easy)
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:18 pm

P-40 Warhawk. Claire Chenault used them in China with the Flying Tigers. That one appears decked out in their favorite paint scheme.
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:31 pm

coaledsweat wrote:P-40 Warhawk. Claire Chenault used them in China with the Flying Tigers. That one appears decked out in their favorite paint scheme.


Nailed it!

The P-40 was the major fighter for the Army Air Corps at the beginning of World War II. Developed from the Curtiss P-36 series, more than 13,000 P-40s were built before production ended in 1944.

The P-40 served in the Aleutians, China, Australia, North America, and the air forces of twenty-eight allied nations including Great Britain, France, and Russia. Though outclassed by most German and Japanese fighters, its ruggedness and firepower allowed the Army Air Forces to hold the line until more advanced designs were produced. P-40s engaged the Japanese during the attack on Pearl Harbor and the invasion of the Philippines in December 1941. They were flown with great success by General Chennault's famed Flying Tigers in China.

In North Africa, they flew from the aircraft carrier USS Ranger to engage the Germans and were flown by the first black combat unit, the 99th Fighter Squadron. The P-40N was the final production version, almost half of all Warhawks built. The aircraft was lightened to improve performance; armor reduced, the forward fuel tank removed and lighter materials substituted. The fuselage behind the cockpit was cut down and replaced with a clear canopy to improve the pilot's visibility to the rear. With a more powerful version of the Allison engine, these changes made the P-40N the fastest of the series. A number of "N" models, including the aircraft on display, were modified into advanced trainers by adding a second cockpit behind the pilot. During the Second World War, the Warner Robins Air Technical Service Command provided logistic support and depot-level maintenance of all P-40 aircraft in Georgia, Florida, North and South Carolina, and Virginia. The aircraft on display was obtained by the Museum of Aviation in 1994 with help from the 653rd Combat Logistics Support Squadron (CLSS) and the Air Force Reserve. Restoration was done by the Museum staff, Middle Georgia Vo-Tech and the 653rd CLSS.
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Mon Mar 31, 2008 7:16 pm

As I recall, they were a little underpowered and the machine guns were on the light side, 6 .30 caliber Brownings. Later WWII fighters went to .50s, lots more bang for the buck with those. :)
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Chris Murley On: Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:38 pm

ok kids, lets see how good you are........


Image
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:49 pm

A cessna 210 Centurion, maybe a 210P for pressurized.. ??? Yeah, looking at the small windows it's a P model..

Greg L

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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:26 am

coaledsweat wrote:As I recall, they were a little underpowered and the machine guns were on the light side, 6 .30 caliber Brownings. Later WWII fighters went to .50s, lots more bang for the buck with those. :)


Also they couldn't turn with a Jap Zero. The way Claire Chennault (Flying Tigers) taught his men to dogfight with the Zero was to attack & then dive away. (their superior speed in a dive would let them outrun the Zero)
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Chris Murley On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:12 pm

p-210, close....... .p210 what? notice that long pointy nose...... thats no oil sloping, vibrating, shake itself to death piston banger under there ;)
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:14 pm

Chris, you don't want me to have a go at it, do you?
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:15 pm

Ok, I didn't notice the lack of cooling air inlets.. so it's got one of the turbine conversions??? but the exhaust looks too small for a turbine,, unless there is another one on the other side of the cowling... then it's a free-turbine like a small Pratt&Whitney...
I don't keep up with the milliion dollar single turbines... Heck I don't keep up with any aircraft other than the one I'm assigned to anymore... don't have enough extra unused brain cells.

Greg L

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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:28 pm

Chris' pride and joy from O & N .... P-210 Silver Eagle Conversion.
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Chris Murley On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 7:00 pm

yep, there ya go.... thats what i build at work :) rolls royce 250-b17f2 450-510 hp turbine. just sent one out to germany today, he was getting 295kt ground speed on his way to maine! not too bad for a cessna 210 on 23 gph!
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 7:31 pm

Just went to my favorite aviation weather site.. http://adds.aviationweather.noaa.gov/ He had about 90kts on the tail.. but that means the plane meets the advertised 195-215kts cruise speed...

I flew in a Cessna 206 [I think it was, maybe a 205 or 207??] converted to an allison.. I think the same or similar engine your converted P210 has... This 206 was on amphibs.. what a tall ungainly beast that was on land.. but what a dream on water... to actually have a reversing prop for brakes.. on water...

Does the conversion use a FADEC?? that would be sweet.. Do you have a photo of a typical panel ?? Are you using some of the multi-function display panels yet?? I think they are getting to be less expensive than analog instruments..

I bet they fly nicer too.. the 210 I flew a few times was so nose-heavy that you had to put two cases of oil in the aft luggage to get the CG inside the forward limit with just a pilot on board,, and even then the brakes would lock up the mains real easy once you didn't have any aerodynamic downpressure from full-aft yoke.

Have you been able to increase the performance envelope [redline on speed?]. Nice thing about a turbine, no need for speed brakes.. come with the engine :D

Greg L

.,
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: europachris On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 8:31 pm

LsFarm wrote:Have you been able to increase the performance envelope [redline on speed?]. Nice thing about a turbine, no need for speed brakes.. come with the engine :D

Greg L

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Unfortunately, unless the plane is recertified, the top of the green arc on a piston aircraft becomes the redline when converted to a turbine. Single or twin, it doesn't matter. Only thing that saves your butt is being able to go up a lot higher to get some decent true airspeed out of it (and reduce the hoggish fuel burn of a turbine down low).

Innodyn is coming out with an improved version of the Solar T-62 APU turbine engine (used on Chinook helicopters I believe, among others) as a kitplane engine. Light and powerful (and being a single spool engine, very simple). I'm itching to build up an RV-8 or similar aircraft and stick on in the nose. On that same note, there is a diesel engine under development in the U.K. (Gemini, I believe) that is a 3 cylinder, 2-stroke, opposed piston design, like the old Fairbanks-Morse engines used in submarines and locomotives. 100 and 125hp are under development, and would be sweet on the front end of our Europa, and not as boring as the ubiquitous Rotax 912/914 series (even if they are good and reliable engines).
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Chris Murley On: Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:19 pm

that is correct about the redline speed. i have a few pics of the latest pannel. we are installing chelton pfd's and mfd's in the pilots pannel and regular steam gauges in the engine pannel. working on getting that digitalized though. heres some for works website.....


http://www.onaircraft.com/panels.htm
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.


also, was that 206 you flew, in canada? they brought us their prototype, we did some work then they flew it back and installed the floats. i have a pic of that somewhere. however that one had the smaller 420 hp helicopter engine in it. oh yea, as for the nose heavy problem, we 0 ballance the controls so it flys like a big 150 and the engine is about 200lbs less in weight. thats why we move it 11 inches forward, also install a 44 amp hr battery in the nose. which coincidently makes decent batteries for your mine motor project when we replace them every 2 years.

Image

see, unlike a piston engine, starting a turbine with a low or weak battery can be disaster. as you spool up the engine with a weak battery the starter wont spin it fast enough. so the engine starts slow and hot. one hot start can ruin a 400k turbine. so, these guys have no problem replacing the batteries every 2 years...... which is good for me :D
Chris Murley