Name That Plane

Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 8:25 pm

The strange thing, .. while I was looking for a picture of the "Connie", I came across military.com and VW-11, and a name I recognized of an old buddy from NJ. I wrote to him and have received an email back. :D
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Yanche On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 9:42 pm

Devil5052 wrote:
Yanche wrote:How about posting some Navy sub hunter airplanes?


Here you go...tell me all you know about it please:
P3 Orion anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. Made by Lockheed. Based on the American Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop airliner. In the mid 1970's as a civilian I was one of engineers that designed the next generation of navigation equipment for the P3. It combined the Navy Transit navigation system with Loran C. It greatly improved the existing navigation system. The prototype system was installed on a P3B at Patuxent River, Maryland and flown to Barbers Point Naval Air Station in Hawaii. I spent a month flying patrol missions looking for Russian subs in the Pacific between Hawaii and Alaska to prove the initial navigation concepts. This was long before GPS. The long stinger probe at the rear of the plane is the magnetometer. It's a highly sensitive instrument that can detect a change in magnetic field caused by a submarine close to the surface. The first time we found one I was stunned by how close we circled and tracked the sub. The props made waves in the ocean water. I had been asleep at the forward observers station, looked out and saw one inboard prop feathered. I thought we were going in. We were in a tight circle above the sub. Scared the you know what out out me.

It's the plane with the famous $800 toilet seat. I can tell you that toilet seat seldom got used. If it did get used on a particular flight it was well used. The tradition and rule by the Navy crew was that the first person to use it, cleans it. So it was avoided. But if it did get used every crew member strained to use it. :-) The pea funnel did get used a lot. Flights were long, 6-8 hours mostly boring flying to get on station. I learned a lot of respect for all of the flight crew, Navy mechanics that kept the planes working and the Lockheed tech reps that flew with us. Upon return to Hawaii the plane went through a giant car wash to remove the salt water sprayed on the plane by the props. Great experience for a young engineer and it couldn't have been in a better location, Hawaii! We stayed in the hotel that Don Ho entertained. He would get grandmothers on stage and then sing the tune "Tiny Bubbles" to them. Only he would change tiny bubbles to tiny boobies. Many a red faced grandma!
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 9:51 pm

Yanche wrote:
Devil5052 wrote:
Yanche wrote:How about posting some Navy sub hunter airplanes?


Here you go...tell me all you know about it please:
P3 Orion anti-submarine warfare (ASW) patrol aircraft. Made by Lockheed. Based on the American Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop airliner. In the mid 1970's as a civilian I was one of engineers that designed the next generation of navigation equipment for the P3. It combined the Navy Transit navigation system with Loran C. It greatly improved the existing navigation system. The prototype system was installed on a P3B at Patuxent River, Maryland and flown to Barbers Point Naval Air Station in Hawaii. I spent a month flying patrol missions looking for Russian subs in the Pacific between Hawaii and Alaska to prove the initial navigation concepts. This was long before GPS. The long stinger probe at the rear of the plane is the magnetometer. It's a highly sensitive instrument that can detect a change in magnetic field caused by a submarine close to the surface. The first time we found one I was stunned by how close we circled and tracked the sub. The props made waves in the ocean water. I had been asleep at the forward observers station, looked out and saw one inboard prop feathered. I thought we were going in. We were in a tight circle above the sub. Scared the you know what out out me.

It's the plane with the famous $800 toilet seat. I can tell you that toilet seat seldom got used. If it did get used on a particular flight it was well used. The tradition and rule by the Navy crew was that the first person to use it, cleans it. So it was avoided. But if it did get used every crew member strained to use it. :-) The pea funnel did get used a lot. Flights were long, 6-8 hours mostly boring flying to get on station. I learned a lot of respect for all of the flight crew, Navy mechanics that kept the planes working and the Lockheed tech reps that flew with us. Upon return to Hawaii the plane went through a giant car wash to remove the salt water sprayed on the plane by the props. Great experience for a young engineer and it couldn't have been in a better location, Hawaii! We stayed in the hotel that Don Ho entertained. He would get grandmothers on stage and then sing the tune "Tiny Bubbles" to them. Only he would change tiny bubbles to tiny boobies. Many a red faced grandma!



Thanks alot for the info!


Lockheed P-3 Orion

In 1957, the Navy called for design proposals for a new high-performance anti-submarine patrol aircraft. It suggested that manufacturers try to adapt an existing plane to the task. Lockheed won the design contest by adapting its commercial turboprop, the L-188 Electra. It retained the wings, tail unit, power plant and much of the fuselage. The latter was shortened by about seven feet and incorporated a weapons-bay together with extensive new electronics and other systems. A prototype of the ASW aircraft (designated YP3V-1 and later changed to P-3) was first flown in late 1959. The name "Orion" was adopted in late 1960. Delivery of P-3A production models to fleet units began in August 1962.
The "Orion" was fully equipped for its ASW role, with extensive electronics in the fuselage plus stowage for search stores, and a 13 ft-long unpressurized bomb-bay equipped to carry torpedoes, depth-bombs, mines or nuclear weapons. Ten external pylons under the wings could carry mines or rockets. A searchlight was located under the starboard wing.
Variants of the P-3 included weather reconnaissance aircraft and electronic reconnaissance aircraft that carried special radar, with radomes in long fairings above and below the fuselage and an additional ventral radome forward of the wing. P-3A models were followed and replaced in quick succession by the P-3B and P-3C models each of which incorporated improved electronics. A limited number of P-3s were produced for export under the Military Assistance Program
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 10:55 pm

I won't make you guess. The top plane is a Cessna 172 (?) .. two killed instantly, after dropping another plane for me to work on. The bottom plane is a modified Beech 18, with me installing a new radome, in the snow.

Planes.jpg
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: bksaun On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:00 pm

That Beech is modified alright! One of my favorite classics.

What happened to the 172, stall on take off?

BK
bksaun
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:20 pm

bksaun wrote:What happened to the 172, stall on take off?


I'm not really sure. The two on board were both instructor rated. The plane was using auto gas. I think, they might have decided the carb iced up. They were right off the end of the runway and probably tried to bring it back. It nosed right into the ground!
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: bksaun On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:31 pm

Power loss on take off?

Land Straight ahead! Land Straight ahead! Land Straight ahead!

bop2 She told me many, many times!

BK
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Sun Mar 02, 2008 11:40 pm

I can imagine the two instructors fighting for control on the way down. Supposedly, the impact ripped their hearts loose. :shock: I think, it was 6 feet into the ground.
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:40 am

Three most useless things to a pilot:

Altitude above you
Runway behind you
1/4 of a second ago
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: spc On: Mon Mar 03, 2008 3:53 pm

WOW!!!!!
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Mar 03, 2008 4:10 pm

spc wrote:WOW!!!!!



LOL....Looks like some engineer got carried away playing with paper airplanes!
(But if anyone can do it...I'll put my $$$ on the Skunkworks!)
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Mon Mar 03, 2008 4:11 pm

So, why is that type of information made available to anybody and everybody? So, any "enemy" might be able to get up to speed for the "big fight"? :confused:
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Dallas On: Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:05 pm

Here is a link to pictures of the actual Super Connies, I worked on back in the '60s.
I might even be in them. :?:
http://www.verslo.is/baldur/wv2/VW11.htm
Dallas
 
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:19 pm

No guesses eh.....

English Electric Lightning F1/P1B


Following the successful demonstration of supersonic flight by the two P1 research aircraft WG760 and WG763, English Electric was contracted to develop the P1B fighter aircraft. It was known as the Lightning and was capable of supersonic interceptions of enemy aircraft; it remained in front line service for nearly three decades.

The first P1B Lightning flew on 4 April 1957, the day the Government published a White Paper forecasting the end of manned aircraft and their replacement with missiles. As a result, several British military aircraft projects were cancelled, but the Lightning survived.

It was designed so that its armaments, radar and radio aids were integrated into the aircraft's flight and engine systems. The equipment; long range radar to find enemy aircraft by day and night and in all weathers, radio and navigational aids for operations under the worst conditions, and a dual armament of guided missiles and 30mm Aden cannon, were all as important as the aircraft's manoeuvrability and supersonic speed.

Three P1B prototypes were ordered, they were followed almost immediately with an order for 20 fully equipped pre-production aircraft of which XG337 was the last. Each was used to develop particular facets of supersonic fighter interception. Hence the clearance of the production version for use by the RAF was quickly achieved and aircraft were able to go into immediate front line service as defence against Soviet bombers and fighters threatening the NATO alliance.
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Re: Name That Plane

PostBy: Devil505 On: Tue Mar 04, 2008 6:34 pm

Much easier: British WWII bomber (need the mfr too)
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