DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

Re: DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

PostBy: davidmcbeth3 On: Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:29 am

Or unplug.

Who has cable anymore?
davidmcbeth3
 
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Re: DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

PostBy: Rob R. On: Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:53 am

davidmcbeth3 wrote:Or unplug.

Who has cable anymore?


My thoughts exactly.
Rob R.
 
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Re: DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

PostBy: titleist1 On: Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:20 am

I realize a lot of you guys do streaming over the net for tv. Sounds interesting, what is the connection speed needed to do that? We are on a crappy DSL link that is about 125k, is that fast enough to stream selected TV? My kid wanted to try to download a movie once and the estimated time to download was 4 days.

I haven't tried a digital antenna at our place yet, the in-laws tried at their place about 1 mile away and were only able to get 3 channels, 1 from Philly, 1 from Balt and 1 from Lancaster, all were the same network. Before we had Directv we used an analog antenna and got 5 stations, a mix from Balt & Lancaster.
titleist1
 
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Re: DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Thu Dec 15, 2016 9:12 am

titleist1 wrote:I haven't tried a digital antenna at our place yet
I haven't tried on either. According to the link that was listed in another thread..........zero channels are available to my area
SWPaDon
 
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Re: DirecTV Receiver Replacement Question

PostBy: warminmn On: Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:43 am

titleist1 wrote:I realize a lot of you guys do streaming over the net for tv. Sounds interesting, what is the connection speed needed to do that? We are on a crappy DSL link that is about 125k, is that fast enough to stream selected TV? My kid wanted to try to download a movie once and the estimated time to download was 4 days.

I haven't tried a digital antenna at our place yet, the in-laws tried at their place about 1 mile away and were only able to get 3 channels, 1 from Philly, 1 from Balt and 1 from Lancaster, all were the same network. Before we had Directv we used an analog antenna and got 5 stations, a mix from Balt & Lancaster.


125k is not enough to stream. download yes, stream no, at least thats my opinion. I have 3 MB and can watch netflix fine, but Im not sure how much lower.

A digital antenna is the exact same thing as an analog antenna of old. be careful there as thats a sales pitch. Rabbit ears that worked in the 1940's will still work for digital. An outdoor antenna is best, and if you watch craigslist you can find towers cheap or free if you take them down. A 30-50 foot tower with an antenna will pick up better than a rooftop antenna 15 feet up, but a rooftop is good too. With over air TV, you either get the station or you dont, they dont get fuzzy like they used too.

You could hoist a set of rabbit ears up into the air on a long board and scan your tv, just to get an idea if any channels come in. Try it in a few different positions. rescan each time. Some indoor antennas will pick up stations but most are gimmicks. Outdoor antennas, expesially the old style rooftop antennas are best.

Im very lucky here because of living on the prairie on a high spot I can pick up a dozen stations from 3 states, plus sub-channels. Grit, Laff, Me, Decades, etc., all great channels and free.
warminmn
 
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