I've got the hunting bug...

Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 7:38 pm

A girl I know takes a few deer a year with a 243. As far as I know none have gotten away.
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 7:40 pm

Back to trying to help. What are the hunting conditions . Distance ? Whitetail only or some rodent as well? Wooded or all open?
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: coalder On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 8:39 pm

Flyer, with a .243, all is irrelevant. :D
Jim
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 9:37 pm

coalder wrote:Flyer, with a .243, all is irrelevant. :D
Jim


I just found it funny because so many people have told her its too small a caliber for deer when she first started. In the past 15yrs I bet she has 30 kills at least.
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: coalder On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 9:57 pm

Flyer5 wrote:
coalder wrote:Flyer, with a .243, all is irrelevant. :D
Jim


I just found it funny because so many people have told her its too small a caliber for deer when she first started. In the past 15yrs I bet she has 30 kills at least.

Flyer, a .243 Win is a .308 Win Necked down. It is a formidable high velocity cartridge. If some can handle the recoil of a "more potent" round then so be it. However in the hands of a skilled marksman the .243 has downed everything in the lower 48 including griz. I once bumped into an ol boy many years ago who had family in Alaska. His favorite rifle was a .243 Win which he always used. Now mind you he was a woodchuck hunter therefore a serious shooter. He showed me two photos of two grizzly's he took with that gun. Both neck shots. However please don't ever underestimate the .243 and or marksmanship.
Jim
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 10:39 pm

coalder wrote:I just found it funny because so many people have told her its too small a caliber for deer when she first started. In the past 15yrs I bet she has 30 kills at least.


You can easily kill a whitetail with a .22 if the shot is placed correctly. My mom used to hunt with a .243, it gets the job done on whitetail...but like I said before, they tend to run quite a bit farther when things aren't ideal. That was never a problem when hunting on our own land, or on a large piece of property that we had permission to hunt on...but it really sucks when your prize buck runs over on the neighbors land who is totally opposed to hunting.

He showed me two photos of two grizzly's he took with that gun. Both neck shots. However please don't ever underestimate the .243 and or marksmanship.


There is a big difference between "killing" and "stopping". No one is under estimating shot placement, but I'd be surprised if you could find a guide in Alaska that would take you out with a .243. Same way in Newfoundland, many locals like to shoot moose in the head with a .30-30...but most guides won't take you out with one.

I am not trying to argue for big calibers, just saying you need to know what you are getting into before you buy something.
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 10:52 pm

I would sell you my Ruger Stainless 7mm Magnum, KY but the 400 miles between us is a bit far.
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: coalder On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 11:01 pm

My son recently purchased a Savage 338 Lapua which is a 416 Rigby necked down to .338. He warms up at 600 yds, routinely practices at 1000 yds and often peruses 1500yds, with surprising result. Now that's what ya need for whitetail!!! :D
Jim
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 11:12 pm

coalder wrote:My son recently purchased a Savage 338 Lapua which is a 416 Rigby necked down to .338. He warms up at 600 yds, routinely practices at 1000 yds and often peruses 1500yds, with surprising result. Now that's what ya need for whitetail!!! :D
Jim


Sounds like a good choice for those pesky half mile shots on the flats. :D
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: coalder On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 11:22 pm

Rob R. wrote:
coalder wrote:My son recently purchased a Savage 338 Lapua which is a 416 Rigby necked down to .338. He warms up at 600 yds, routinely practices at 1000 yds and often peruses 1500yds, with surprising result. Now that's what ya need for whitetail!!! :D
Jim


Sounds like a good choice for those pesky half mile shots on the flats. :D


Not for me Ol Buddy, But bear in mind he is a certified military sniper. And Ft Drum has some real long ranges. :D
Jim
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Ky Speedracer On: Mon Dec 28, 2015 11:26 pm

Well thanks to Paul I made a purchase. I say that because he turned me on to the Savage rebate deal. The rebates end Thursday. Thanks Paul! ( oh yeah, my wife thanks you too... Kind of... She said "GREAT! Just what we need...ANOTHER gun... ) :)
Anyway, I picked up Savage Arms 111 Trophy Hunter XP 270 Winchester with a 22" Barrel. It has the Nikon 3-9x40 scope with BDC Reticle sights and an Accu Trigger. It was $496. Then you get a $50 rebate from Savage. That gets me in at $446. I thought that was as good of a deal as I could find for a decent new gun. I've only seen good reviews regarding the Savage guns. I'm sure there are nicer guns out there but I feel like this will get me started.
http://www.kygunco.com/mobile/products. ... chester-22
Thanks for everyone's input. Now I just need to find some places to hunt next fall. :)

Flyer5 wrote:Back to trying to help. What are the hunting conditions . Distance ? Whitetail only or some rodent as well? Wooded or all open?

Primarily white tail. Wooded and open areas both. Ky has prairie like land in the west and mountains in the east. I'm in the center. We have an elk season also. Most of those are in the west.
Any varmint/rodent hunting I will likely use my 5.56.
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:10 am

coalder wrote:
Flyer5 wrote:
I just found it funny because so many people have told her its too small a caliber for deer when she first started. In the past 15yrs I bet she has 30 kills at least.


Flyer, a .243 Win is a .308 Win Necked down. It is a formidable high velocity cartridge. If some can handle the recoil of a "more potent" round then so be it. However in the hands of a skilled marksman the .243 has downed everything in the lower 48 including griz. I once bumped into an ol boy many years ago who had family in Alaska. His favorite rifle was a .243 Win which he always used. Now mind you he was a woodchuck hunter therefore a serious shooter. He showed me two photos of two grizzly's he took with that gun. Both neck shots. However please don't ever underestimate the .243 and or marksmanship.
Jim



I never said I did.I was one of the ones that talked her into getting a 243. But others were saying it was too small.
Flyer5
 
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:13 am

Ky Speedracer wrote:Well thanks to Paul I made a purchase. I say that because he turned me on to the Savage rebate deal. The rebates end Thursday. Thanks Paul! ( oh yeah, my wife thanks you too... Kind of... She said "GREAT! Just what we need...ANOTHER gun... ) :)
Anyway, I picked up Savage Arms 111 Trophy Hunter XP 270 Winchester with a 22" Barrel. It has the Nikon 3-9x40 scope with BDC Reticle sights and an Accu Trigger. It was $496. Then you get a $50 rebate from Savage. That gets me in at $446. I thought that was as good of a deal as I could find for a decent new gun. I've only seen good reviews regarding the Savage guns. I'm sure there are nicer guns out there but I feel like this will get me started.
http://www.kygunco.com/mobile/products. ... chester-22
Thanks for everyone's input. Now I just need to find some places to hunt next fall. :)

Flyer5 wrote:Back to trying to help. What are the hunting conditions . Distance ? Whitetail only or some rodent as well? Wooded or all open?

Primarily white tail. Wooded and open areas both. Ky has prairie like land in the west and mountains in the east. I'm in the center. We have an elk season also. Most of those are in the west.
Any varmint/rodent hunting I will likely use my 5.56.



The Savage trigger is great out of the box. Good choice.
Flyer5
 
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Ky Speedracer On: Tue Dec 29, 2015 1:06 pm

Lets talk sighting or zeroing a rifle;
I know zeroing your rifle is a relatively simple process if you know the exact yardage that your target will be. But when hunting, I would imagine there are multiple variables. My assumption at this point is that I will be ranging shots from 75 to 250 yards.
From what I've read so far it seems like there are 2 prevailing zeroing concepts;

1) The 26 yard zero to achieve "point blank" range (which seems to pretty much be the same as the 25 meter military zero I use for my "modern sporting" rifles).
Here is a quick summary:

* "Point blank range defined is the range of distances at which you can hold your rifle on the bullseye and never fall in or out of your target’s kill zone. The point blank range for a deer, for example, is generally regarded as six inches. In other words, if you hold dead center on the vitals, your bullet can be 3 inches high or 3 inches low before it slips out of the vital zone."
*"I found that by zeroing my rifle in at 26 yards, the .270 will deliver its bullet 2.81 inches high at 100 yards, 2.80 inches high at 200 yards and 2.12 inches high at 250 yards before finally falling out of the 6-inch vital zone at 310 yards. This means that with a 26 yard zero, I can hold dead-center of a deer’s vitals and kill it cleanly from 0 to 310 yards without adjusting my hold."
*beware that when zeroing at close range, you must strive for perfection. Place a dime-sized spot on the target and do not deem your rifle “good” until the bullet actually punches that dime on a consistent basis. If you are an inch high or low, or to the left or right, you will be way off at longer range, and it defeats the whole purpose of zeroing in at such a specific range. If you can’t hit the dime at 26 yards, it indicates that your rifle (and/or you) probably isn’t accurate enough to be shooting at long range anyway, because if your rifle is grouping 1-inch at 25 yards, for example, it will likely be 4 inches off at 100 yards and well off the paper at 300. But with the technique mentioned above, you can simply aim for an animal’s vitals out to 300 yards and concentrate on a smooth trigger pull."
You can read it all here http://www.americanhunter.org/articles/ ... ting-zero/

2)The 100 yard zero.
*"Reason number one (to use a 100 yard zero) is theat parallax adjustment is generally set by the scope manufacturers at 100 yards. Parallax is the bending of light rays by the lenses in the scope so the crosshairs really are somewhere other than where they look like they are.
*"Reason number two? One hundred yards is far enough that if your scope isn’t properly lined up with the bore of your rifle, it will be very evident and you will most likely run out of windage adjustment before the gun is on target. If this happens, stop what you’re doing and go see a gunsmith."

This actually may be the answer;
*"Long story short, when setting up your rifle and scope, shoot at the distance the scope manufacturer adjusts the parallax to, which is usually 100 yards. But zero the gun to the distance that best suits your hunting situation."
you can read where these came from here http://unionsportsmen.org/why-zero-at-100-yards/

My guess is either will work but I thought I'd see if anyone had a strong opinion one way or another or may even have another zeroing tactic.

One additional question; I have heard some say that you should wait some time between shots in order to keep the barrel from getting to warm. Somehow that can effect it's accuracy. I'm assuming that using 3 to 5 shot groups will be needed to zero. I've never done that with any of my other rifles but I never use them to shoot more than 150 yards either...
Ky Speedracer
 
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Re: I've got the hunting bug...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Tue Dec 29, 2015 1:35 pm



For hunting rifles Zero I usually use 100yds then I go by the trajectory charts for what ever round.
Last edited by Flyer5 on Tue Dec 29, 2015 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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