Cooking with lard

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: NJJoe On: Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:22 am

unhippy wrote:We have started cooking with lard in the last few years.....soooo much better taste and you seem to use alot less lard as well compared to to the amount of olive oil or butter that you used to cook the same meal.

The lard that i get is from a butcher that does a nice little side business rendering down the pork fat into lard...of which he has 2 types, one for baking and a 'frying' grade lard.....dunno what he does differently but you can taste the difference if your cooking with it.


Lard used for baking (like for pie crusts, shortbreads etc...) is made from the visceral fat surrounding the kidneys/loins of the pig. This fat renders into pure white and has very little pork flavor making ideal for sweets/baked goods. We would wet-render this by grinding the raw fat into tiny pieces and then boiling. Skim the melted fat off the top.

Lard used for frying and for savory dishes has a more pronounced pork flavor. Usually this is rendered from fatback or caul fat and dry rendered. Put the ground fat into a pan (with only a few tablespoons of water to keep it from initially burning) and bake it. The resulting lard is slightly brown in color and very porky.

Saw my cousin's wife spreading lard onto bread and she couldn't stop eating it. "This is the best butter I've ever tasted" she exclaimed. :D Then she learned the "butter" was really lard. I like to take some cold lard and spread it onto toasted bread (like butter). Add some salt, pepper and raw chopped onions. So delicious...
NJJoe
 


Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: lsayre On: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:00 pm

Cooking used to also often be done with tallow, which is rendered beef fat. Some shortenings today still contain tallow.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13.5 KW)

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:27 pm

FYI, while looking for places online to buy lard, I came across this site. It gives a bit more info of what others have been saying about the differences in types of lard and tallow and what they are best used for.

http://www.texasnaturalsupply.com/Lard- ... rpf-on.htm

http://www.texasnaturalsupply.com/Tallo ... rbf-on.htm

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: lsayre On: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:47 pm

The famous taste of the McDonald's French fries of our younger days came from their secret of frying them in beef tallow. The practice was ended only when (after years of this practice) it was discovered that they were also doing this in India, where the cow is sacred, and eating beef is taboo.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13.5 KW)

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: coalfan On: Thu Jun 23, 2016 9:35 am

i can get both here and the two are a match made for all my iron cookware it doesent get any better !!!!!and good for the iron to !! :)
coalfan
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: handfed coal stove
Coal Size/Type: nut/ pea ant.some bit.
Stove/Furnace Model: ds circulator/1500 sl/wh.

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Jun 23, 2016 9:49 am

More good info about lard.
http://www.cooksinfo.com/lard

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: fifthg On: Fri Jun 24, 2016 8:12 am

Apparently we never should have moved away from cast iron.(or coal)Properly seasoned cast iron is the choice of many top chefs.It is non-stick and retains heat very well.Both are very important features in cooking.Back, to the future! Coal and cast iron.
fifthg
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Harman DVC 500
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning # 500
Baseburners & Antiques: Peninsular Western Hot Blast No.44K and Reading Foundry & Supply Co.
Coal Size/Type: stove,nut,pea,buck,and rice -Gale Mining Co Anthracite

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: coalfan On: Fri Jun 24, 2016 8:50 am

bout time you woke back up!!!! LOL :) :) :) :D
coalfan
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: handfed coal stove
Coal Size/Type: nut/ pea ant.some bit.
Stove/Furnace Model: ds circulator/1500 sl/wh.


Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:10 pm

Like the old saying, "What's old is new again ! " ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Jun 27, 2016 5:58 pm

I ordered some lard this morning from a small farm out West. "Leaf lard".
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Rob R. On: Sat Jul 02, 2016 11:02 am

Got two packs. Even came with some vintage recipes to try.
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Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: tikigeorge On: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:38 pm

Made in USA, Lodge cast iron, the best. No soap, wash with hot water, dry with paper towel, wipe or spray with oil, and heat pan to remove moisture and open pores to let oil in the the cast iron.
tikigeorge
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: KA-6

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Jul 04, 2016 7:59 am

Yesterday my wife made a lemon meringue pie and used the "1914 pie crust recipe" that came with the lard. Not only was it the simplest/easiest crust we have ever made, it was very flaky and delicious. A winner.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: NJJoe On: Mon Jul 04, 2016 9:23 am

Rob R. wrote:Yesterday my wife made a lemon meringue pie and used the "1914 pie crust recipe" that came with the lard. Not only was it the simplest/easiest crust we have ever made, it was very flaky and delicious. A winner.


Sounds great. Do you mind sharing the pie crust recipe? Im not a baker but my fiance is.
NJJoe
 

Re: Cooking with lard

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Jul 04, 2016 10:54 am

NJJoe wrote:
Rob R. wrote:Yesterday my wife made a lemon meringue pie and used the "1914 pie crust recipe" that came with the lard. Not only was it the simplest/easiest crust we have ever made, it was very flaky and delicious. A winner.


Sounds great. Do you mind sharing the pie crust recipe? Im not a baker but my fiance is.


I emailed it to you. Would have just posted it here but not sure about Copyright issues.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy