Another Glenwood Adoption Finalized!

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Keepaeyeonit On: Sun Nov 20, 2016 10:18 am

Hi all, with the 1st somewhat real test I am very impressed with the heat output of this stove, how it throws the heat without a blower and the noise that goes along with it :dancing: .
It's not cold at 32° but the wind is blowing 40 at times with the house around 80° :shock: , I'm running around 350°( I lowered the stove temp after I reloaded it) with the pipe at 165° ( I'm guessing thats due to the wind pulling the draft well over .10 at times with both MPDs closed and in base mode) I'm using around 30# in a 24 HR period but I'm sure that will be lower without the wind.
I am kinda surprised by the amount of ash the I'm getting out of this Lehigh stove coal, I got a full pan in the last 24 HRs and full pan in 48 HRs running at idle (230°-250°) I may run and get some stove from one of our local dealers and some Coal Contractors nut that I have always used and know to be very good in a hand fed. stay tuned theres more to come :)
Keepaeyeonit
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #8
Coal Size/Type: Direnzo nut, Lehigh stove
Other Heating: 45 year old oil furnace,and a crappy 24 year old heat pump

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: joeq On: Sun Nov 20, 2016 12:16 pm

With a fire pot as big as an "8", and 30lbs of coal burning, I don't think a full ash pan is all that unusual. It would be like comparing it to a 455 at idle, which is gunna pull more fuel than a smaller engine. I hear that Glenwood would've helped us out a little better by using a bigger ash pan.
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Canaan coal man On: Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:31 am

Keepaeyeonit wrote:Hi all, with the 1st somewhat real test I am very impressed with the heat output of this stove, how it throws the heat without a blower and the noise that goes along with it :dancing: .
It's not cold at 32° but the wind is blowing 40 at times with the house around 80° :shock: , I'm running around 350°( I lowered the stove temp after I reloaded it) with the pipe at 165° ( I'm guessing thats due to the wind pulling the draft well over .10 at times with both MPDs closed and in base mode) I'm using around 30# in a 24 HR period but I'm sure that will be lower without the wind.
I am kinda surprised by the amount of ash the I'm getting out of this Lehigh stove coal, I got a full pan in the last 24 HRs and full pan in 48 HRs running at idle (230°-250°) I may run and get some stove from one of our local dealers and some Coal Contractors nut that I have always used and know to be very good in a hand fed. stay tuned theres more to come :)


Try opening the secondary Air damper to help with wind gust. That will pull more air over the fire instead from primary air and will aid in slowing the fire. Also if you have a damper in your rear elbow that would help as well if its open.
Canaan coal man
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: A little cubby coal stove in the basement
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove And Nut

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Keepaeyeonit On: Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:46 pm

Happy Spring friends well its camping season so the house Is cold again :cry:, I just want to give a good and bad update on how my 1st year went with our Glenwood #8. I know our winter was a joke here In NE Ohio to say the least but Its over anyways all I can say about the stove Is Wow, I still can't get over the way the stove throws the heat without any kind of convection blower( which Is the reason I sold the 983 ) although we only had a few weeks of teens with some days in the single digits the stove kept the house In the upper 70's with ease with the barrel temp never reaching 500°.
The 2 middle grates were warped when I purchased the stove but I didn't think It was going to be a issue, well I think It was( I left Skip a PM about getting 2 new ones ) as far as the shaking went plus the coal I got last fall was loaded with rocks so I'm sure that didn't help any either. I did dump the fire one time during the winter due to operator error :oops: , some how the fire got low so I decided to dump and restart as It was less time to do that then nurse It back from the brink, I was having a bad day anyways so I'm sure that had something to do with the decision.
Now for the single bad thing I'm not used to yet but I'm getting better with, the burn times are not as good as the 983 due the fact that the Hitzer could hold over 100 LBS of coal ( I added fire brick to the front of the stove so I had a real deep bed of coal ) and the #8 is around 70 LBS or so, My tending schedule was 15/9 HRS due to work but that wasn't ever a problem for the stove. I liked the 24HRS burn times with the 983( 350 to 400°) although I don't think I would push the #8 while burning the stove that hot, coal consumption noticeably lower then the 983 but I never saw the pipe temps( taken right before the clay at around 5' from the stove) as low as most do and I can't figure why, I almost always saw pipe temps 1/2 of what the barrel temp was or slightly better but never 1/4 of the barrel.
Towards the end of the season I was idling the stove with temps around 180° to 190° and 20 LBS per 24 HRS which I thought was good for not trying to push It to low, I used 5200LBS of coal since November 2016 although I thinks thats a tad high but I will get the efficiency up as time goes on, I will take a closer look at the efficiency next year now that I have something to go by ( don't beat me up for this Larry :ugeek: ) but I'm averaging around 1.20 LBS per HDD for the 1st season which I don't think is bad but at the end of the day we were very warm :yes: .
I am glad I made the leap Into the Baseheater world but my second choice in stoves would be another Hitzer without a doubt , so now as spring is here here she sits sporting her summer look :)
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Its a real big PITA to disconnect the flue pipes so I'm doing the same as I did with the insert, I have a rubber seal plug I push down the chimney to the steel pipe and with the bulb and damp-rid I have never had a rust issue, the pipe I had with the insert was in for 4 seasons and just had light surface rust and would have went for at least another 4 years without being removed. Have a good summer and thanks for watching .
Keepaeyeonit
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #8
Coal Size/Type: Direnzo nut, Lehigh stove
Other Heating: 45 year old oil furnace,and a crappy 24 year old heat pump

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: McGiever On: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:01 am

Thanks for the updated report, Barry. :D

Enjoy those camping adventures this season and do check back in here as time allows. :)

McG
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: joeq On: Sat Apr 29, 2017 5:55 pm

So, all in all KY, because your Hitzer held 25% more coal, but the G8 has more radiating surface area, would you say the Glenwood equals the heat out put of the Hitzer, or leans in another direction? And did you burn stove size coal during the colder temps, or did you stick with nut only?
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Keepaeyeonit On: Sat Apr 29, 2017 9:43 pm

Joe, I think the the heat output is close to each other plus I feel the coal capacity of the Hitzer was over 100 (110 to 120 would be my guess)but it never actually checked it. I was burning a mix of Direnzos nut and Lehigh stove.
Now keep in mind that's no blower and it used less coal then the Hitzer, I was dumping a lot of coal during shake downs so I'm sure that added up over the course of 4 1/2 months, once I get the shakeing thing down my efficiency will increase, the #8 is the winner hands down but the 983 is no slouch!!
Keepaeyeonit
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #8
Coal Size/Type: Direnzo nut, Lehigh stove
Other Heating: 45 year old oil furnace,and a crappy 24 year old heat pump

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 30, 2017 12:29 am

If you find that your dumping large embers, and unburned coal with Glenwood triangular grates, that's a sure sign that your moving the shaker handle through too much arc. You only need to move the handle end about a 1/2 to 3/4 inch left and right.
It also helps if the shaker handle is a lose fit. If it's a snug fit you get less shock vibration transmitted by the grate bar to the coal bed.

"Short, choppy stokes" is the common description. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Keepaeyeonit On: Sun Apr 30, 2017 6:46 am

Sunny Boy wrote:If you find that your dumping large embers, and unburned coal with Glenwood triangular grates, that's a sure sign that your moving the shaker handle through too much arc. You only need to move the handle end about a 1/2 to 3/4 inch left and right.
It also helps if the shaker handle is a lose fit. If it's a snug fit you get less shock vibration transmitted by the grate bar to the coal bed.

"Short, choppy stokes" is the common description. ;)

Paul


Thanks Paul, I tried to always do that but with the warped grates they would often jam so in the process of clearing them I ended up with a lot of coal in the pan, If they were straight to each other, turned and didn't swing like they do that would make it a whole lot better for sure, Its bad depending on which way they are, they hit each other and will jam, I need to replace the two center ones for sure, your right for sure "short choppy strokes" is the key :yes:
Keepaeyeonit
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #8
Coal Size/Type: Direnzo nut, Lehigh stove
Other Heating: 45 year old oil furnace,and a crappy 24 year old heat pump

Re: Another Glenwood adoption finalized!

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 30, 2017 8:59 am

I had that problem when I first got my range. Inner grate bar was warped just enough that they could not be rotated daily. I learned to not drop a lot of coal and spent a lot of time scraping up through the grates with a right-angle poker.

But even at that, it still had a slow buildup of clinkers that sat on top of the grate bars where the poker couldn't get to them. Those clinkers would grow larger and larger over time. As the clinkers grew, the firebox had less room for fresh fuel, then heat output dropped off slowly over about a month's time to where we were struggling just to get up to cooking temps. Recovering from reloads took longer too. Eventually, about once a month I'd have to shut down and clean out the firebox. Then, it was amazing how much heat it could put out, and how much longer it could go between refueling, with a firebox full of fresh fuel !!!!!

Plus, not being able to rotate the grates daily, the warpage got worse over time because of one side of the bars always being so much hotter than the other two sides. The non-warped grate bar was starting to show signs of being heat-age.

The grate bars in this range are an odd-ball length. For ten years I searched and non of the stove shops had a set. So, a couple of years ago, before that one straight grate was no longer good enough to use as a pattern, I prepped it and sent it off to Tomahawk. Two weeks later the new bars were here and they did a fantastic job !!!

Now, being able to once a day rotate the grate bars 1/3 turn before shaking ash, dumping those clinkers while they are still small and crumbly makes the range act a firebox full of fresh coal. Higher cooking/baking temps are easy to do now, and the range is putting out far more heat that is saving me money. There is a noticeable drop in my monthly electric bills for the house electric furnace. Enough difference in savings that the new grate bars and spares were paid for within the first few months of the first heating season after the bars were installed.

Talk to Wilson and get new grate bars. You'll be glad you did !!!!! ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace