Thermal impact from coal heat?

Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: tcalo On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:47 am

This may be best posted in a construction forum, but on the other hand it is coal related I think... :D . I believe I may already know the answer but would like to get opinions. I recently renovated a room in my house where my coal stove is. Completely stripped down to the studs! I replaced a window and patio door with Andersen products. I chose Andersen 200 series which is wood construction with a vinyl cladding, the better of their products so I thought? I finished the project about 5 weeks ago and everything looked beautiful. I fired up my coal stove about 3 days ago. I haven't been running it too hard because the weather hasn't been to cold. About 2 days ago I started having trouble with my sliding patio door. The inner glass panel seems to be a bit warped causing issues. The inner and outer panels have locking weather stripping. Due to the slight warp in the inner panel the weather stripping isn't lining up and the door is hard to close. I also noticed hairline cracks on all the sheet rock seems. I'm thinking these issues are from the coal stove drying out the air. I contacted Andersen about the patio door panel. They are replacing the panel under the warranty. That still leaves the issue of the sheet rock seems. My guess is since it is fresh (only a few weeks old) the stove may be drying out the moisture in the spackle and paint too quickly causing it to shrink and crack...just a thought. My wife didn't exactly enjoy the mess I made during the renovation, but loves the finished room. She said "please leave it until the spring, no more mess"... :lol:
tcalo
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby Coal Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Our Glenwood 109
Coal Size/Type: Nut Anthracite


Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: Lightning On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:31 am

Did you use drywall tape join the sheet rock sections?
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: Rob R. On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:36 am

Sounds like too rapid of a change in humidity.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:40 am

Have you finished the interior surfaces of the doors with paint or poly? As to the sheetrock , if the framing was installed and quickly sheetrocked , the moisture levels in the structure hadnt reached an equilibrium before it was covered up. Likely , if you heat the room with anything to the temps you are with coal it would do the same thing. Lastly, if you are noticing cracks above doors and windows, it is likely due to improper installation. ( lack of adhesive, poor joint location) Most likely it is due to the drastic change of humidity , so it will stop after a time and can be repaired.

waldo
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:51 am

We too have finished garages that had perfect sheetrock seams. We used fiberglass seam tape and had problems, all the paper tape seams never had any issues. We even slow dried the garages with constant even heat. My garage never gets below 40, but my neighbors does and we still both had cracking.
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: tcalo On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 9:51 am

Lightning wrote:Did you use drywall tape join the sheet rock sections?

Yes, taped all the seams with paper tape.

Rob R. wrote:Sounds like too rapid of a change in humidity.

That was my thought as well.

waldo lemieux wrote:Have you finished the interior surfaces of the doors with paint or poly?
The patio door in question is solid wood covered with vinyl clad. It's a finished patio door from Andersen.

As to the sheetrock , if the framing was installed and quickly sheetrocked , the moisture levels in the structure hadnt reached an equilibrium before it was covered up.
I kept the original framing, but some of the studs weren't exactly straight or even. I had some trouble spots fitting the sheet rock on smooth. Too much tightening and the sheet rock cracked.

Lastly, if you are noticing cracks above doors and windows, it is likely due to improper installation. ( lack of adhesive, poor joint location) Most likely it is due to the drastic change of humidity , so it will stop after a time and can be repaired.
The only cracks I see are along the sheet rocks seams. The headers above the window and doors are fine.


Thanks for all the advice. I figured I would go through the season and make the repairs in the spring. That way it would have all summer to acclimate. The cracks as of now aren't bad at all. As far as the patio door goes, Andersen is replacing the warped panel under their warranty.
Last edited by tcalo on Wed Oct 12, 2016 10:09 am, edited 2 times in total.
tcalo
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby Coal Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Our Glenwood 109
Coal Size/Type: Nut Anthracite

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 10:07 am

You need to run a humidifier when heating a house. Otherwise the house takes a beating, floors, walls, anything that can absorb moisture is going to get real dry fast. And it doesn't matter what the heat source is. Winter air is dry, heating and expanding that air makes it a lot drier. ;)
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: tcalo On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 10:51 am

coaledsweat wrote:You need to run a humidifier when heating a house.

I normally do, just haven't got them out of storage yet... ;) .

On a side note, do you think solid wood was a better choice over solid vinyl products? Solid wood rates far superior in construction, longevity and thermal ratings according to all the research I've done. A bit more money but I thought it was well worth the investment. I'm not sure how solid vinyl products would react to the thermal changes?
tcalo
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby Coal Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Our Glenwood 109
Coal Size/Type: Nut Anthracite


Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Wed Oct 12, 2016 11:45 am

Vinyl does react to temps, and a lot. We did a fascia in vinyl on and older house with 3'X8' sheets. Big gaps when the cold set in. It was an exterior application. It won't react to moisture though.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Thermal impact from coal heat?

PostBy: McGiever On: Thu Oct 13, 2016 7:40 am

Is the issue the same throughout the room, or worse near the stove's position?
Wasn't a stove heat shield eliminated during this upgrade? Any shield reduces the direct radiant heat emitted...with out it the radiant heat can be powerful, as you already know.

:idea: There are several types of drywall 'mud' compounds, perhaps another would give better results. :idea:
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek