Advice

Re: Advice

PostBy: Lightning On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:31 am

I feel your pain on wanting to do something different on a small budget, been there done that.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

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Re: Advice

PostBy: epd1088 On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:32 am

i think it will be way too big and stick out too far from the fireplace
epd1088
 
Other Heating: Electric baseboards

Re: Advice

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:39 am

epd1088 wrote:i think it will be way too big and stick out too far from the fireplace

You want it out of the fireplace, the idea is to move air around the stove.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Advice

PostBy: epd1088 On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:45 am

but not hanging off of the hearth, correct?
epd1088
 
Other Heating: Electric baseboards

Re: Advice

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:46 am

If you can purchase that Alaska stove for a decent price,what would you lose setting it in your basement & at least supplementing your overall heating ?

Sometimes the best thing to do in a situation like this is to just go ahead with the project at low money outlay & see how well it works out.
We can't all start out at the top of the ladder with our heating systems,some of us start at the bottom.
From the bottom ,there is always room to move upward toward the ultimate system.
Install the used Alaska in your basement & see what happens
If heat movement is an issue,you can make some return air vents in the floor at the opposite end of the house where the stove is located
From those floor vents,run ductwork down to 6" from the floor,that should give good upstairs cold air movement down to the basement
When cold air is pulled out,warm air will replace it.
Try it,do it cheap,but do it safe,it should make your winter more pleasant inside the house.
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Advice

PostBy: Lightning On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:53 am

epd1088 wrote:but not hanging off of the hearth, correct?


How tough would it be to extend the hearth a little to accommodate the stove? Is that an option?

Even if it meant stacking a few red bricks without cementing them in, just to get you thru a year.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size

Re: Advice

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 11:15 am

My first house - 1500sf two story. I had a potbelly stove in the basement. As others have said the basement was warm, not so with the first and second floor, even if the stove was running full blast cherry red. Still had to heat the upstairs with the oil burner. What little I saved on oil I spent on coal and just added the work of having to maintain a hand fed stove.

If you want to get the most heat with the coal stove to be warm, basically your choices are either move the stove to the floor you live on, or move you to living in the basement. But trying to heat the upstairs by just convection from a stove in the basement is not going to do much for your comfort.

however, having to go up and down stairs to tend the stove will be the only thing that warms you while your upstairs. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Advice

PostBy: Doby On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:39 pm

Alaska supplied me with a piece of steel you tap con down to the hearth, it sticks out about 8 inches to support the stove and is cut to the shape of the Kast, easy without extending the hearth.

My Kast is in a finished basement of a ranch total heating space 2400sq ft, after trial and error got the heat to move upstairs good, 80 downstairs equals 72 upstairs when temps are in the 20's and teens other times its 75 and 72

The stove will struggle with single digits on windy days
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Last edited by Doby on Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Doby
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Kast console and Alaska Channing III
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: oil but not much

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Re: Advice

PostBy: Doby On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:50 pm

Plus you have to watch some of the older kast counsole models were only 40,000 btu's as compared to the newer paddle feed models 85,000 btu's
Doby
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Kast console and Alaska Channing III
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: oil but not much

Re: Advice

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:38 pm

Hi epd...I have been heating 2200 sq ft. (basement and 1 floor above), with a hand fed in the basement. I blow heated air into my cool air return system of my oil furnace and it works very well until around January then I must lite the stove in my livingroom fireplace. my brick ranch has NO insulation in the walls just cinder blocks, bricks on the exterior and sheet rock on the interior.

I am presently insulating my basement walls with rigid foam insulation and seeing a difference already and I'm only 40% done. If your bedroom floors are carpeted you will NOT notice the warmth that much. Most important: you need cool air to get to your stove in order for the heated air to replace it. Your Basement will rob you of heat you need upstairs negating the deal you speak of. ;)

Mike
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box stove, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Baseburners & Antiques: Home Sparkle 12
Coal Size/Type: Coal Contractor's stove, a little Kimmels 'nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: Advice

PostBy: warminmn On: Wed Nov 23, 2016 8:58 pm

My reply is mostly a combo of several posts, but I would put it in the basement, insulate the basement walls as well as you can afford too, then after that, draw up a detailed blueprint of your upstairs layout, size of rooms, etc., maybe with pictures, and I guarantee if you post that info here you will get some great advice on moving the heat upstairs. It is amazing how much some members here know about air movement. The air movement part can be done cheaply, just holes in the right place, maybe a fan, its knowing where to put them that matters and you will get that help here.

Then next summer you can try to improve on your situation. Maybe another stove upstairs, or moving this one up there, or staying how you are.

Its kind of hard for members to give air flow help without a very good drawing as its all guesswork then. You have to kind of think backwards when moving heat. instead of pushing the heat somewhere, you move cold air to the hot room. Its the "where from" air movement part that is important. good luck whatever you try to do.
warminmn
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby Junior, Efel Nestor Martin, Frankenstove
Coal Size/Type: nut and stove anthracite. Soft coal
Other Heating: wood

Re: Advice

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:52 am

Hi epd...I have been heating 2200 sq ft. (basement and 1 floor above), with a hand fed in the basement. I blow heated air into my cool air return system of my oil furnace and it works very well until around January then I must lite the stove in my livingroom fireplace. my brick ranch has NO insulation in the walls just cinder blocks, bricks on the exterior and sheet rock on the interior.


I have a very large old house (7000 sq ft) that I mostly heat with warm air from the basement. It started out as a first step on the way to hydronics but it now works so well that I am set and very happy so don't you get discouraged by the hydronics only crowd.

My home is probably bigger and even more split up so the first step is understanding your floor plan, size and location. Warm air is harder to move around than hot water but it usually can be done. It's a lot less expensive, cheap to run and much less complex. I can detail my layout but that would not be helpful as yours is probably way different. Here is a real fun part. The front part of the house three (3 floors) is heated by convection only via a double heater system. Just for kicks I offer this pic. What could be more beautiful? The back pipe is being made in copper as I write. William Sherrick (a board savant in old stoves) has been here and was blown away. All done with no water or even electricity. I have a video of him talking about it that I must edit and get published. Don't get discouraged. I hear you brother. I can even heat this giant with no power on but it is more work. Electricity is just a convenience. Many board members have tried to get me committed but I have a good attorney. :D The wing with William in the photo is heated by a Wings Best BB stove. However, a $100 Jotul 507B that I have in the tractor shed would do just fine as well. -20* --- no problem --- mother nature, bring me your worst.
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William - ready for dinner.
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coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Invader 2
Baseburners & Antiques: Wings Best, Glenwood #8(x2) Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice,
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Advice

PostBy: Rob R. On: Thu Nov 24, 2016 7:57 am

Simon brings up a good point.

Is there any desire to have a system that operates without electricity, or is very quiet? Hand fired equipment certainly wins a both counts when compared to a stoker-insert.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Advice

PostBy: Qtown1835 On: Tue Nov 29, 2016 5:12 pm

I have a handfed MKIII in my basement that heats my 1500SF rancher just fine. I have been using it for 2 seasons now this year being the start of the 3rd. I burn about 4tons a year of lehigh nut from November-Early April. I too have an unfinished basement. My house was built in 1963 with single pane anderson windows with storms. I have a stone fireplace on the living floor and 1 in the basement. The there 3 flues in the mansonry chimney 8x8 for the oil boiler and 2 10x14 for the fireplaces. I installed my stove infront of the hearth in the basement and extended 6" stove pipe from the stove into the existing smoke chamber and into the chimney as far as i could get the pipe. I then packed the smoke chamber with rockwool and it is good to go. I was concerned about draft with such an oversized tile flue but I have no problems maintaining draft during heating season. I like to run my stove @ -0.05 on the mano. with a manual damper. During the warmer days I will run full damper with a 1/2 turn primary air and will draft -0.03 which keeps the stove at about 150*. With all that said, i can easily keep my house at 70*+ on the stove side and about -4* from stove side to the opposite end of the house where the bedrooms are.
Qtown1835
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker '81 KA4 (online 1/16/17)
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman MKIII
Coal Size/Type: Nut & Rice Lehigh
Other Heating: EFM SPK600

Re: Advice

PostBy: epd1088 On: Tue Nov 29, 2016 7:22 pm

QTown,

Are you getting heat upstairs and in the bedrooms this way?
epd1088
 
Other Heating: Electric baseboards

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