WM stove temps

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Fri Dec 30, 2016 10:24 pm

Corey and mcgiever thanks for the tip. I tried the stove size coal in the 617 after work and so far it is working great. Less volatiles (smoke) rolling in the stove compared to the stoker size. Stove not getting near as hot...highest temp has been 600* but only for 5 minutes. Idling at 300* with 4 chunks in stove. Loading door vents closed and under air open 1/4 ". Will see how it holds overnight but house temp is very comfortable. Thanks again. This coal came from middlesboro ky but I didn't get analysis sheet for the stove size coal so I'm not sure what exactly it is other than bit coal.
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now


Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: corey On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 10:49 am

half-pint wrote:I've found using pieces that are at minimum softball size helps a LOT with Bit coal. Another little trick I learned to help with puffbacks is to keep a little wood in the stove with the coal. The wood will keep a open flame in the firebox to burn off gasses before they build to an explosive level. My shop furnace is large so I use pieces about the size of a football in it and rarely have any issues at all. I just buy what they call "run of mine" coal and bust it up myself with a sledgehammer here at home. Makes for a good way to take out pent up anger and frustrations from day to day life.

I don't know if he could fit wood in his stove maybe. But it's a small model stove.
corey
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: corey On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 10:55 am

jsplott wrote:Corey and mcgiever thanks for the tip. I tried the stove size coal in the 617 after work and so far it is working great. Less volatiles (smoke) rolling in the stove compared to the stoker size. Stove not getting near as hot...highest temp has been 600* but only for 5 minutes. Idling at 300* with 4 chunks in stove. Loading door vents closed and under air open 1/4 ". Will see how it holds overnight but house temp is very comfortable. Thanks again. This coal came from middlesboro ky but I didn't get analysis sheet for the stove size coal so I'm not sure what exactly it is other than bit coal.

The above fire vent is more important with bit. The lower vent controls fuel bed temp and upper burns the smoke. Also if stove is in good working order you should be able to get the stove to simmer along.
corey
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:00 am

Straight stove size does not work real well in my HITZER when idling real low.
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:07 am

Stove simmered all night and I just added a couple pieces to recharge this morning. So far so good. I can use wood as someone mentioned above but firebox is not big so I have to basically cut my wood to kitchen stove size wood. House is 69* oat below 30* 12 hours since last load. I'm happy.

Shannon
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: corey On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:09 am

freetown fred wrote:Straight stove size does not work real well in my HITZER when idling real low.

Is that Anthracite?

I've heard Berlin talk about simmering a bit fire before reason I'm bringing the low fire up here.
corey
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:16 am

Yep, just sharin a HITZER (MINE) observation. :)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:48 am

When I use the stoker size and after it has burned volatiles off, I can shut stove down and simmer at +/-200* for a fairly long time. Going to try to do same with stove size and see how it acts. I like being able to keep low Temps due to wild swings in oat 20s at night almost 50 during the day
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now


Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: McGiever On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 11:52 am

Me thinks his North Carolina stove size is bituminous coal and doesn't compare well w/ any anthracite coal. :)
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 12:00 pm

Yes it is bit coal. I got it from premium processing in middlesboro ky. The only anthracite I have tried is Kimmel that is sold at local tractor supply. I liked the anthracite pretty well but have more bit already laying outside. The anthracite seems to want more air than the bit but stove seems to perform well with either.
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: corey On: Sat Dec 31, 2016 1:33 pm

Glad it working out.

Some bit coal can be better then anthracite especially eastern KY lump coal.
corey
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: AlaskaCoal1 On: Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:55 am

I have the same problem JS but i do not really have a choice on the size of coal... only two to choose from what they call stoker size and what is called lump... lump coal varies in size from softball size to smaller than baseball ball size actually more like racquet ball size for the most part... stoker is much smaller than that but really never paid it much attention to tell you the truth. It is all sub bit... I was able to control it for a while and thought I had the problem solved but it has reared its ugly head again.. 700 during the early burn is not uncommon... tending the stove with my work schedule gets tough due to the fact I have to load it a little at a time or load larger amounts and then work the under fire air for some time to keep the temps from getting out of control... makes it difficult on limited time. Not at all like my Harmon TLC which is load it full... open the ash door get it flaming and then close her up and turn her down... 10 min maybe 20 if I really allow the coal bed to burn way down and I mean way down.

My initial fix is to build a rosemont type heater to help reduce my wicked draft... and to put a fan behind the stove to help wash the heat off... hopefully that works out well...
AlaskaCoal1
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Sequoya Outdoor boiler
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman TLC, Warm Morning 500
Baseburners & Antiques: Beckwith Round Oak
Coal Size/Type: Alaska Sub Bit Lump

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Thu Jan 05, 2017 8:45 am

By using the larger size coal like was suggested by other members here, I have been happier with the stove performs. I was aggravated using the smaller size due to the amount of time I had to set aside just to control Temps while loading the stove. With the larger pieces, I am having to relearn the stove but so far I am getting good burn times and am able to fill stove a lot faster. The stove is a Wm 617a so I doesn't take much to fill it up especially with larger size coal.
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: jsplott On: Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:33 pm

Ok I'm back for an update. I have really enjoyed the 617 more since switching to the larger size coal. We had some cold weather a couple of weeks ago and temps got down to zero. Inside temp was 75+ with under and over air dampers completely closed. A little too warm lol. During warmer weather stove idles under 200 all day long keeping it above 70 inside. Now this is what leads me to my question for this group...today was beautiful and warm enough so I thought I would sweep the chimney before firing up the stove this coming weekend. I was amazed at the amount of soot that came out of the chimney. It filled the firebox half full. Since this is my first season and still learning here are my questions..is this normal to have that much soot? Am I burning the stove too cool not allowing the soot to burn up? Is the soot from poor quality coal? I have a 6" pipe from stove thru the roof. Black pipe to ceiling then stainless double wall thru attic thru roof. No more than 15' total length. Any ideas? Thanks

Shannon
jsplott
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: researching now

Re: WM stove temps

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:44 pm

Slow burning of Bituminous will cause soot to build up. You can't get it hot enough to burn the volatiles and the slower burning keeps the soot from being evacuated so it just clings there.

One thing you can try, is a 'hard burn' once a week. It may help with the soot problem.
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous
Other Heating: Oil furnace