Advice on reading susquehanna

Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Wed May 21, 2008 9:36 am

After doing a lot of reading here and a lot of thought I have decided to get a Reading susquehanna furnace. Currently I have an oil furnace in my rental house and it costs way too much to run. I have the landlords permission to install the furnace and have checked my insurance so all is well in those departments. I have a place to store the coal and a place to dispose of the ashes as well.

Anything else I need to consider and/or any other advice you care to share would be appreciated.
Lumberjack
 

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed May 21, 2008 10:17 am

I've rewritten this post several times to make it less 'confrontational' but it still may sound 'not very nice'... but here goes:

I'm really currious what factors were involved in deciding on that unit?? A furnace, maybe, because of having forced hot air heat, a stoker yes, but a triburner stoker?? that is an old outdated design. All other bed-type stokers have upgraded from the triburner design to a full time fan, making them less dependant on draft for keeping the fire burning, and burning efficiently

What about domestic hot water?? Are you going to add a hot water coil ?

And,, any manufacturer that shows their products with a 'Magic Heat' flue-stack heat reclaimer is telling you that their products send too much heat up the chimney... not efficient at all.. That alone would have sent me running... away.

I'm sure you have read it here many times.. but a boiler with a water-to-air heat exchanger will heat both the hot air for the ductwork, your DHW and be more efficient with storing heat when the house thermostat say: 'enough'... but the coal fire keeps burning.. and the heat goes up the chimney,, a boiler stores that heat, a furnace can't..


Anyway.. I don't mean to rain on your parade,, but I'm really currious about your decision..

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Wed May 21, 2008 1:18 pm

LS I have read your previous posts on the boilers and while I agree with you to a point, That kind of modification to the house is way too involved for a rental unit and would not be very easily reversable.

The stove is not a tri-burner either if you mean multi fueled. It only burns coal. It does have two burn pans and 170k btu with a large hopper and ash pan. The water coil idea is one I forgot about and should ask if it is possible.

I am not sure what you mean by magic chimney but I assume from your post you believe the flue temps will tend to be too high. Any advice on ways to keep the temps to the correct levels? I am assuming I should install a barometric in the flue stack, Should I dump the Magic thing or is there a better way to control the draft?

I considered a fireplace insert but there were some objections from "she who must be obeyed". I also looked at a few other brands but there were financial considerations and I don't think the other dealers were giving me very good prices. They certainly were not giving me any breaks. The dealer closest to me does not do install's nor do they service the stove so I ruled them out in about 30 seconds...

Finally I prefer rude but valid points over politeness. They are usually the only posts worth reading.
Lumberjack
 

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Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: lewis On: Wed May 21, 2008 2:12 pm

LsFarm wrote:I've rewritten this post several times to make it less 'confrontational' but it still may sound 'not very nice'... but here goes:

I'm really currious what factors were involved in deciding on that unit?? A furnace, maybe, because of having forced hot air heat, a stoker yes, but a triburner stoker?? that is an old outdated design. All other bed-type stokers have upgraded from the triburner design to a full time fan, making them less dependant on draft for keeping the fire burning, and burning efficiently


Greg L


Tri Burner Fans run all the time, but at variable speeds (Try Again)

Stoves using this design burner are among the most popular in the resale market and many have provided years and years and even generations of reliable service .

Lumberjack
Use the forum as a guide only many predominate members are set in there opinions and offer little lee way to thinking beyond what they are familiar with .
lewis
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Old Model Magnum

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Sting On: Wed May 21, 2008 2:36 pm

lewis wrote:
Lumberjack
Use the forum as a guide only many predominate members are set in there opinions and offer little lee way to thinking beyond what they are familiar with .



I have not noticed that! :lol:


BTW -- Greg's advice is always clear and politically correct!
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: coal berner On: Wed May 21, 2008 3:17 pm

Here is some info on all feed type stoker's units Single Dual & Twin motor Tri burner Feeders

http://www.automationcorrect.com/docume ... ll_Web.pdf
Last edited by coal berner on Wed May 21, 2008 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
coal berner
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1986 Electric Furnace Man 520 DF
Stove/Furnace Make: Electric Furnace Man
Stove/Furnace Model: DF520

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed May 21, 2008 3:20 pm

Lumberjack, I appologize,, like I said at the begining of my first post I rewrote it a few times.. but it still came across as rude..

The Triburner is a brand name for the stoker unit in the Reading stoves.. Yes they burn only coal. These Triburner stokers are like I describe below, [to Lewis] an older design.. but with some rather simple modifications can be made to work similar to the newer designs.

I understand that if you are adding a coal burning appliance to a rental house.. that you want something easily removable.. I didn't think about that. And the much-favored boiler system would not be that easy to remove.. more for a perminant instalation. Ductwork would not be that difficult to tap into and then patch up if/when you remove a furnace.. I was thinking that the home was yours..not a rental. I need to read more completely.

The 'Magic Heat' heat reclaimer is the box with built-in tubes that Reading shows sitting on the top of the furnace, it is an aftermarket item, just look on ebay for one.. They are designed to reclaim heat from a chimney.. and blow it into the room.. in your case with a furnace, this heat will be heat that is not getting into your ductwork..

For keeping the chimney temps down, yes a barometric damper is a must.. especially if you have a chimney that has a strong draft. I'm not sure if a standard water coil will install in the reading furnace.. but if you want to get the most heat for your coal-dollar, it would be nice to heat your domestic hot water too.

Sorry again for the 'tone' of the first post.. I probably should have kept my hands in my pockets.. but I just don't like seeing people spend money where better methods or products may be available..

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed May 21, 2008 3:27 pm

Lewis, I'm quite familiar with the triburner.

A triburner's fan does not run unless the stoker is stoking..if the stoker is not stoking the combustion fan is not running,, the only air getting through the idling coal bed is from chimney draft.. So if the grate is full of burning coal, and the thermostat is satisfied, the combustion fan /stoker turns off. There is no combustion air but what the chimney can draw through the grate and bed of coal. [not much]. so the coal starves for air,, the coal only partially burns. The next time the thermostat calls for heat, this partially burn coal is pushed of the grate into the ashpan... it's an old design.

This is why the new style bed-stokers have combustion air blowing full time.. And this is why a favorite modification to the old-style triburners is to add a second fan that runs full time to keep the idle fire burning hot and completely burning the coal on the grate.. the old triburners don't burn coal as completely as the new designs.. just facts..Yes a triburner has a three speed control, but only Reading currently uses the old triburner with one motor. All the bed type stokers have the same basic design.. But they have been modified with the understanding that the fuel on the bed needs to burn fully, so the new designs have full time combustion air, even to an idling fire.

Yes there are tons of Triburner stoker stoves out there, and many change hands in the used marketplace.. but they are not as effecient as the new designs.. that is why Leisureline and other stoker designs have two fans on them.. to make them better.

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Rob R. On: Wed May 21, 2008 3:49 pm

Hello Lumberjack. According to the reading stove page, that furnace has a rated output of 170,000 btus. How large of a house are you trying to heat? Also, what are you using for a chimney to vent the susquehanna?

I am in a similar situation, renting a big house with an oil boiler that costs a fortune to run. I am making plans to buy the home in a year or two, but until then installing a coil boiler isn't an option. I'm currently installing a hand-fed coal stove to ease the pan for the next winter or two.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Wed May 21, 2008 7:26 pm

Lewis, I too have my own opinions, But I still remember to at least consider the inane ramblings of the village idiot. Sometimes they are right. :) (this commment in no way reflects anyone specific....)

Thanks for the burner info and the nice pamphlet on the coaltrol system.... :) I will look into modding the burner if the need arises. That magic thing is after market? Maybe that was why the model I saw didnt have it installed. The installer is coming by next week to see what will really need to be done so I wont find out for sure exactly how the venting will go. I suspect they will want to power vent it as the chimney is not in good shape. I am somewhat at the installers mercy....at least untill it has been inspected. :roll: Anyone have experiance with the power type vents and the baro dampers? Do they work ok together?



Mark- the first thing is to talk your land lord into it. This place is about 1800 sq. feet and I could have gone to the smaller Juanita furnace but the Susquehanna was only $500.00 more and has the capacity to heat any future place I may take it. As a few on here have said and the dealer agrees it is better to have a bit larger stove and not have to drive it at full power all winter. Because of the landlord situation I am having the furnace installed for me to protect everyone involved. The install will also give me a lot better idea as to how the stove actually should be done assuming the installer does a good job. I wont be plunking down any money untill I am satisfied that the installer will be fairly competent. Also you might want to see if your landlord is willing to help with the furnace as it might be a good sell point for him with the fuel prices so high.
Lumberjack
 

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Wed May 21, 2008 9:19 pm

lewis wrote:
LsFarm wrote:I've rewritten this post several times to make it less 'confrontational' but it still may sound 'not very nice'... but here goes:

I'm really currious what factors were involved in deciding on that unit?? A furnace, maybe, because of having forced hot air heat, a stoker yes, but a triburner stoker?? that is an old outdated design. All other bed-type stokers have upgraded from the triburner design to a full time fan, making them less dependant on draft for keeping the fire burning, and burning efficiently


Greg L


Tri Burner Fans run all the time, but at variable speeds (Try Again)

Stoves using this design burner are among the most popular in the resale market and many have provided years and years and even generations of reliable service .




Lumberjack
Use the forum as a guide only many predominate members are set in there opinions and offer little lee way to thinking beyond what they are familiar with .



My Tri-Burner Alaska has been performing very well since I installed it. The one feature I did not like was the single motor design. I have modified it and added a separate combustion fan that runs full speed all the time. I get more complete burning of the coal regardless of the feed rate.

I feel the Tri-Burner is a good design with the only flaw being the single motor. I don't understand why Reading uses this design, why they don't have a separate combustion fan. I would not consider that brand unless you plan to add another blower for the combustion air.

Also, I thought Greg's post was fine.

BTW, with no combustion blower running my Alaska will be out in less then 20 minutes.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Wed May 28, 2008 9:38 pm

well the Dealer came by tonight and we talked over several different setups.

The chimney needs a liner to be used so that was about 1700.00 for 26 feet. The direct vent is 650 installed. I dont see that the vent will use 1000.00 worth of power and we can take the direct vent with us when we move so It looks like direct vent wins.

I asked about other models that might work for me and he suggested the Koker. The installed price was about the same and the burner appears to be a little better.

After all is said and done this looks it is gonna cost me 5000.00 plus fuel. Payback will be about 2 years.
Lumberjack
 

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: watkinsdr On: Thu May 29, 2008 10:22 pm

Yo Lumberjack:

Just finished my first season with my Keystoker Koker; and, this is one great coal burning furnace for the money. The unit is built like a tank, the hopper holds a full 240+ lbs. of coal, and the full bushel ash pans (two are supplied) hold 24+ hours worth of ash. I added a programmable thermostat; and, this really helped reduce coal consumption and accurately regulate heat---plus this allowed me to crank up the Koker early in the morning to have the whole house toasty warm prior to the alarm going off in the morning. I also highly recommend the "LL solution" for integrating this hot air furnace with your existing duct work. Check out this link: http://www.leisurelinestoves.com/1904137.html

Go coal my friend. You'll be glad you did. The Keystoker Koker is a solid choice too. Plus, the Coal-trol thermostat is available now too.
watkinsdr
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S260 Boiler

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Fri May 30, 2008 8:34 am

Yep, I am liking everything I am reading on the koker so I think that will be the winner.
Lumberjack
 

Re: Advice on reading susquehanna

PostBy: Lumberjack On: Sat May 31, 2008 10:05 am

I forgot to add the coal-trol is only a 150.00 upgrade and the domestic hot water loop is a 200.00 upgrade.

I am thinking i will have the furnace pre-drilled for the loop so I can easily install it later.
Lumberjack
 

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