Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: Rob R. On: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:36 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:I'm fairly sure I was gonna do that for Dave last time I had the trailer here....never got around to it. :oops:


It will make for a good conversation on the side of I-81 when one of the tires passes you and goes into a strip mine.
Rob R.
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: top top On: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:36 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:I understand your point, but just let me add I have seen the previously described spare, I don't think it will be an issue.


Not arguing, many people don't realize that unused tires age out faster than tires being used. Obviously the person actually looking at them is best qualified to make that call. Here is link to a Michelin article about RV tires which, just like boat trailers, often don't see a lot of use.

https://www.michelinb2b.com/wps/b2bcont ... ochure.pdf

MICHELIN
®
RV Tires
9
AGING, WEATHER CHECKING, AND
OZONE CRACKING
During the pre-trip inspection, be sure to check the
tires for signs of aging, weather checking, and/or ozone
cracking — these show up as tiny cracks in the rubber
surface on the sidewall of the tire. If the cracks are less
than 1 ⁄ 32” deep, the tire is fine to run. Between 1 ⁄ 32”
and 2⁄ 32”, the tire is suspect and should be examined by
the Michelin dealer. If the cracks are any deeper than
2⁄ 32”, the tire should be replaced immediately.
Here are a few tips to help you protect the tires from
these common damage conditions:
1)
Keep the tires properly inflated.
2)
Keep the tires clean.
3)
Avoid prolonged exposure to heat, cold, or moisture.
4)
Avoid prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays.
5)
Cover the tires when the vehicle is not in use.
6)
Do not park near electric generators or transformers.
7) Do not store vehicle in an area where welding is being
done or in a garage that has mercury vapor lamps.
LONG TERM STORAGE OF RV TIRES
Unless the RV owner is a full-time RV-er, the vehicle
probably spends some time in long-term storage. But
what the RV owner probably didn’t know is that rubber
tires age when not being used
. So, if the owner must store
the RV, a cool, dry, sealed garage is the best bet. Also,
some storage surfaces can cause tires to age faster
. That’s
why Michelin recommends placing a barrier (cardboard,
plastic or plywood) between the tire and the storage
surface.
Here are some other steps the RV owner can take to
help reduce the aging effects from long-term storage:
1)
Thoroughly clean tires with soap and water before
placing into storage.
2) Cover tires to block direct sunlight and ultraviolet
rays.
3)
Store out of a high ozone area.
top top
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: top top On: Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:27 pm

I had a folder with links to NTSB articles dealing with trailers, but don't have it at hand. Here is a link to NTSB.gov, but you will need to search for the info. If I can find the direct links I will post them.

https://www.ntsb.gov/Pages/default.aspx

Here is another article from a Hummer Enthusiasts board.

http://www.hummerknowledgebase.com/tire/store.html

I know this is going to sound nuts, but the worst thing to do is store tires. It doesn't matter if they are inflated or deflated, stored in a "cool dark place" etc. When a tire is used, its emollients and oils get heated up and lubricate the rubber. If storing tires, they dry out, the rubber becomes brittle and more prone to failure. There is no magic rubber treatment or storage technique you can do to avoid this.

Ever notice that trailer tires, boat trailers and RV's seem to have a high level of blowouts on the freeway? Many of these vehicles only get used a couple of times a year. Often the owner sees a full tread tire that looks ok, but it may be 7 to 10 years old with only 3 or 4 thousand miles on them. Using a tire is the best thing you can do to keep a tire "lubricated".
top top
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: CoalHeat On: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:19 pm

Good info, thanks for taking the time to post. I'll leave it up to Dave to decide about the spare.

My Ford Falcon has bias ply tires on it that were purchased in 1978. :shock: . On my '66 Plymouth I have radials, but the spare is one of the original tires.
CoalHeat
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: CoalHeat On: Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:25 pm

Rob R. wrote:
Wood'nCoal wrote:I'm fairly sure I was gonna do that for Dave last time I had the trailer here....never got around to it. :oops:


It will make for a good conversation on the side of I-81 when one of the tires passes you and goes into a strip mine.


Excellent point.
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CoalHeat
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: top top On: Sun Jan 29, 2017 2:21 am

Wood'nCoal wrote:
My Ford Falcon has bias ply tires on it that were purchased in 1978. :shock: . On my '66 Plymouth I have radials, but the spare is one of the original tires.


In the 1990's I bought a low mileage one owner '63 Chevy Impala still wearing the original tires. The owner was president of a local bank and she used the car to commute to work. Almost a quarter mile each way, 25 mph speed limit. The tires were bias ply, over 30 years old, and still looked great. I actually ran them a couple weeks without a problem. The daily exercise with enough weight to flex the sidewalls must have worked. On the other hand I recently acquired a Chevy pickup that was only used to haul trash to a landfill about four miles away, every four to six months. The tires look great, expensive LT radials with deep tread. At least they look great from a distance. You get close enough to actually look at them and they are scary. Deep cracks and splitting everywhere. I was going to check the date code on the tires, but I was afraid to put my face that close without deflating them first.
top top
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: Berlin On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:08 am

In my experience a good - not chinese made - bias tire will blow out less catastrophically and less frequently than a radial for high speed trailer use. Radials get better fuel economy, bounce less, and wear longer, but, there will be a higher failure rate of radials in trailer service. Some of the equipment rental places swear by using LT radials on trailers instead of trailer tires - better quality, fewer failures if you want to go radial.
Berlin
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:35 am

Berlin wrote:In my experience a good - not chinese made - bias tire will blow out less catastrophically and less frequently than a radial for high speed trailer use. Radials get better fuel economy, bounce less, and wear longer, but, there will be a higher failure rate of radials in trailer service. Some of the equipment rental places swear by using LT radials on trailers instead of trailer tires - better quality, fewer failures if you want to go radial.


:roll: ^^^^^
This kind of uninformed ,uneducated thinking is the same as the one about retreads on big truck tires..... Tire tread rubber collected from the highways has proven that tread loss on new tires is more frequent than it is from tires that have been retreaded. Most all tread loss & tire failures like blowouts are caused by UNDER-INFLATION,piss poor maintenance on the tires.
The only way one could claim more failures on radial trailer tires than the bias trailer tires is..... bias tires on frequently used trailers wear out b4 they age to the point of blow out.... radials last longer & if not on a trailer that sees high yearly mileage will last long enough to get old enough to fail. I would still rather run radials on my trailer & throw them away with decent tread depth than to subject myself to the disadvantages of bias tires bouncing everything to death.

I just bought a brand new trailer for my business,i made them install radials.I bought from a dealer who sells trailers from major manufacturers. My preference would have been to have bought from a family run trailer manufacturer in a nearby town.... BUT,when talking to them about a trailer,i asked about radials being installed.The old guy I was talking to informed me with his mis-informed,uneducated rant about how that radial tires were no good & would fail as soon as they warmed up. His mistaken claim was that the steel belts heat up & that is the end of the tire. I asked him if he runs radials on his car... NO, he runs bias ! Well,anyone that thinks bias tires are better needs to spend a few yrs in a semi pulling trailers with radials vs the bias tire equipped container chassis trailer...... then report back to us your findings. :gee:
The issue of LT tires being used on a trailer was brought up earlier & I explained then how the LT tire would not likely be available in a heavy enough load rating in the size the OP was posting about.LT tires usually have 16/32"+ tread depth vs 10/32"on the trailer tire. The deeper tread will run warmer,will wear more erratically,will likely run more miles b4 wearout,which will likely mean it will get even older than the typical radial trailer tire,putting the LT tire into that failure category.
windyhill4.2
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:58 am

Whatever your choice, do not mix bias and radial tires. That's just asking for trouble.
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 12:36 pm

My friend is a mechanic and pretty fussy about a lot of things recommended bias because he claimed the sidewalls where more durable on the bias vs radial. He claimed he has seen radials get sidewall slices on minor obstructions.
2001Sierra
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 12:54 pm

2001Sierra wrote:My friend is a mechanic and pretty fussy about a lot of things recommended bias because he claimed the sidewalls where more durable on the bias vs radial. He claimed he has seen radials get sidewall slices on minor obstructions.


That same theory was what kept many from updating big truck tires & farm tractor tires to radials...... until true experience showed the benefits of running radials far outweighed the few disadvantages in both truck & tractor tires.

And I have seen slices in the treads of bias tires from the silliest little things... like a stone puncturing the tread,or a piece of shale slicing thru the tread,both of which would likely never happen with the steel belted radial.

BUT.... As was mentioned earlier in this thread...... If the trailer will be getting more miles inside scrap yards than out on the road..... buy & install bias tires.. it won't be as expensive to keep replacing the frequently cut tires.

Your mechanic friend likely has seen this sidewall issue with passenger car rated tires rather than the stiffer walled LT or ST rated radial tires.

My qualifications for posting the info that I have about tires ,comes from the fact that I have been a tire dealer since 1982.... And I was one of those who spent much time in studying tire issues in various tire publications,etc. At one time in my earlier yrs. I had over 600 used tires in stock + new tires.
windyhill4.2
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: gaw On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 1:37 pm

VigIIPeaBurner; it looks like you would really like to try radials so take the plunge and buy four, its only money. You can report back with your findings.

The large semi-trailer radial tires have been around for years and take a lot of abuse, I don’t know if you can assume the same endurance for the smaller sizes or not. The big rubber piles caused by a catastrophic failure of a large truck or trailer tire are often the result of duals running one tire severely underinflated. A tire run low and then re-inflated will usually explode shortly after. I know of one such tire exploding as it was being aired up, the guy was lucky as it was an inside tire and just knocked him a bit silly. It could have been much worse. Something you see more often these days on the big semi-trailers is an airline going through the axles and attached to the tire or tries to keep them constantly at proper pressure even if they develop a small leak like a nail puncture.

windyhill4.2 wrote:The old guy I was talking to informed me with his mis-informed,uneducated rant about how that radial tires were no good & would fail as soon as they warmed up. His mistaken claim was that the steel belts heat up & that is the end of the tire. I asked him if he runs radials on his car... NO, he runs bias !

He must go out of his way to find those.
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 1:51 pm

gaw wrote:VigIIPeaBurner; it looks like you would really like to try radials so take the plunge and buy four, its only money. You can report back with your findings.

The large semi-trailer radial tires have been around for years and take a lot of abuse, I don’t know if you can assume the same endurance for the smaller sizes or not. The big rubber piles caused by a catastrophic failure of a large truck or trailer tire are often the result of duals running one tire severely underinflated. A tire run low and then re-inflated will usually explode shortly after. I know of one such tire exploding as it was being aired up, the guy was lucky as it was an inside tire and just knocked him a bit silly. It could have been much worse. Something you see more often these days on the big semi-trailers is an airline going through the axles and attached to the tire or tries to keep them constantly at proper pressure even if they develop a small leak like a nail puncture.

windyhill4.2 wrote:The old guy I was talking to informed me with his mis-informed,uneducated rant about how that radial tires were no good & would fail as soon as they warmed up. His mistaken claim was that the steel belts heat up & that is the end of the tire. I asked him if he runs radials on his car... NO, he runs bias !


He must go out of his way to find those.


As far as I know,there are no bias tires made in the USA for cars,so he may be running chineese tires........ OR,wait !! ..... :idea: He might be running those high quality bias trailer tires on his car. :roll: toothy
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: CoalHeat On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:00 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:
As far as I know,there are no bias tires made in the USA for cars,so he may be running chineese tires........ OR,wait !! ..... :idea: He might be running those high quality bias trailer tires on his car. :roll: toothy


https://www.cokertire.com/tires/styles/ ... tires.html
CoalHeat
 
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Re: Dump Trailer Tires: Radial or Bias?

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:39 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:
As far as I know,there are no bias tires made in the USA for cars,so he may be running chineese tires........ OR,wait !! ..... :idea: He might be running those high quality bias trailer tires on his car. :roll: toothy


https://www.cokertire.com/tires/styles/ ... tires.html


I had known about that company,i did forget about them when I posted earlier,but I was thinking more in the line of normally produced tire lines with normal prices.

Mighty high prices on those classic car tires !!!!!!!! I suppose he might be driving an old enough vehicle to fit one model of those pricey tires.
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