Never Saw Anything Like This

Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: bigstick6017555 On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:07 am

coaledsweat wrote:Ionic solids, that sounds a bit crunchy.

http://sciencing.com/dissolves-salt-bes ... 54840.html

I'm going to try and dissole the salt and reassemble it and see if it works the way it should.


i have had that problem on a few Chevy pickups, turns out that flexible rubber hose was the problem. would let brake operate but would not release pressure for brakes to back off. check it out. may be some of your problem.
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:36 am

yep, caliper hose-been there done that!!!!!!!!! :(
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: bigstick6017555 On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:52 am

i just seems like something is not releasing pressure some where? good luck
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 11:22 am

Baring any electrical problems,....

If the brake hoses are old, they sometimes swell shut. Because of the reinforcement built into them to limit expansion you don't see the swelling on the outside - instead, they swell inward where you can only see it with the hose off.

When they swell shut the greater pressure created by stepping on the brake pedal will easily push fluid through forcing the hose to open enough to make the brake stop the car. But there is far less force to release the brakes and return brake fluid to the master cylinder reservoir when you let the brake pedal up.

With drum brakes, the return springs are often just strong enough to over come the restriction of swollen brake hoses so that the brake shoes can push fluid back through to the master reservoir. Then the brake shoes only drag for a short ways, but eventually they release until the next time you step on the pedal.

But with disc brakes, there are no strong return springs. The suction created when you let the pedal up, plus the elasticity of the rubber piston seal are all that pulls the caliper pistons back enough to make clearance between the pads and rotors - which is only a few thousands of an inch at most. On some Fords not even that. They are designed to slightly drag the pads to keep them warm and have less grab from suddenly heating up in use.

With a swollen brake hose in a disc brake system, when you let the pedal up, rather than fight the hose restriction, it's easier for the master cylinder piston to pull fluid from the reservoir instead. So the swollen hose will make a caliper retain some amount of pressure and drag. The more swollen the hose is the more tightly the caliper holds the rotor.

Another thing that will hang up the brakes is sleeved cables for the emergency brakes. The steel cables inside the nylon lined sleeves rusts, swells, and then binds. When you put on the emergency brake there's a lot more force to pull the rusty cables through to actuate the brakes, but when you release it, the return springs are often not strong enough to move the binding cable back to it's released position. Then your emergency brakes are dragging.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:37 pm

Not the hoses. I explained what it was, it is the damn salt building a crust on the exposed portion of the piston under the rubber seal. If it was hoses, replacing the caliper wouldn't have solved it. This is all four calipers, not some random event.
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: jpete On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 1:49 pm

coaledsweat wrote:Gets even crazier trying to get these parts, no one has them for one of the most popular cars on the road. NAPA can have one by noon for $100, need to bring the core or it's $60 more. Ordered one from the Jeep dealer for tomorrow morning at 8:00, $45 brand new, no core. Unbelievable! :lol:


Just
Empty
Every
Pocket.

:D
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Re: Never Saw Anything Like This

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:35 pm

coaledsweat wrote:Not the hoses. I explained what it was, it is the damn salt building a crust on the exposed portion of the piston under the rubber seal. If it was hoses, replacing the caliper wouldn't have solved it. This is all four calipers, not some random event.


" I'm going to try and dissole the salt and reassemble it and see if it works the way it should."

Sorry, sounded like you were still trouble shooting and not 100% certain that was the only cause of the problem.

BTW, when brake hoses go bad from swelling, it's rare that they don't all go if they are the same age and make. And the symptoms are not random.

If you've got corrosion issues with the piston, I can pretty well guarantee that the caliper guides are rusted, lumpy with rust scale and wear spots, and won't allow the caliper to back off the way it should when the pedal is released - unless the high spots of rust scale are dressed off with a file, then greased with disc brake lube. Rusty guides will hang up the caliper and drag pads, new calipers, or not. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
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