Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:51 am

Thinking about picking up a used Ridgid threading setup in order to make some sturdy shelves and even some cool looking furniture using black pipe. Black pipe flanges and other off the shelf hangers make great mounts to floors, walls, ceiling etc... and with the right imagination you can build some sturdy industrial looking stuff. Anybody know about these tools and and can give some threading tips?

Also Ridgid lists 2 different types of pipe threaders and die sets. Exposed and enclosed dies. Whats the difference and benefit?
NJJoe
 


Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:15 pm

Use plenty of cutting oil and make sure the dies are sharp. A dull one will make lousy threads. No real difference in performance of the two styles.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:39 pm

You need specific tool called a teenager for this task. :P Prepare for a workout.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:39 pm

coaledsweat wrote:Use plenty of cutting oil and make sure the dies are sharp. A dull one will make lousy threads. No real difference in performance of the two styles.


I know there are some differences in the size of the pipes each style can thread. Other than that no real difference? Makes me wonder why Ridgid makes and continues to sell the 2 designs.

I have a tristand and pipe cutter already. Looking for a ratcheting threader with die set and oil can to complete the deal
NJJoe
 

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:40 pm

Richard S. wrote:You need specific tool called a teenager for this task. :P Prepare for a workout.


Lol beleive me I want a threading machine but cant afford one for what amounts to occasional hobby work. Im primarily going to be threading 1/2, 3/4 and the occasional inch pipe.
NJJoe
 

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: warminmn On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 1:53 pm

Dont forget to show us a pic or two of your completed projects! I love art that shows peoples imagination.
warminmn
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby Junior, Efel Nestor Martin, Frankenstove
Coal Size/Type: nut and stove anthracite
Other Heating: wood

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: davidmcbeth3 On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 2:58 pm

Harbor Freight mig welder to the rescue !

https://youtu.be/z6ynAMACdMo?t=170
davidmcbeth3
 
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea/anthra
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 503

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: cabinover On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 6:26 pm

NJJoe wrote:
Richard S. wrote:You need specific tool called a teenager for this task. :P Prepare for a workout.


Lol beleive me I want a threading machine but cant afford one for what amounts to occasional hobby work. Im primarily going to be threading 1/2, 3/4 and the occasional inch pipe.


1/2 won't be too bad, 3/4 will be a handful after a couple of them, 1"....I wouldn't want to by hand. Know any LP techs?
cabinover
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Hybrid Axeman Anderson 130
Baseburners & Antiques: Sparkle #12
Coal Size/Type: Pea, Buckwheat, Nut
Other Heating: LP Hot air. WA TX for coal use.


Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: hotblast1357 On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:53 pm

I did my 1/1/4" black iron by hand, as long as the dies are sharp and well lubricated it's not to bad, I'm only 26 though lol
hotblast1357
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1984 Eshland S260
Coal Size/Type: anthracite pea
Other Heating: oil furnace

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: Vbull On: Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:10 pm

I found it easier to cut the threads on a lathe to make legs for several shooting benches.
Vbull
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Reading Juanita
Coal Size/Type: rice

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: davidmcbeth3 On: Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:11 am

Vbull wrote:I found it easier to cut the threads on a lathe to make legs for several shooting benches.


I call lathes finger removal systems .... LOL
davidmcbeth3
 
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea/anthra
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 503

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: pintoplumber On: Fri Mar 17, 2017 5:05 am

If you're planning to thread 1/2", 3/4" and 1" you'll need to buy 3 separate threaders. Threading by hand isn't bad. If we only have a couple of threads to do do, we'll do it by hand rather than drag out the power machine and set it up. Heck, I even have a 2 1/2" to 4" threader with a hand ratchet. It might only get used once every 10 years though. Dennis
pintoplumber
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham number series 17
Other Heating: Oil, forced hot air. Rheem

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: BunkerdCaddis On: Sat Mar 18, 2017 11:56 pm

pintoplumber wrote:Heck, I even have a 2 1/2" to 4" threader with a hand ratchet. It might only get used once every 10 years though. Dennis


Years ago I was on a sprinkler job in a mall store refab, there was some 6 and (if I recall correctly) 8 inch on the mains :eek2: I was glad we used Victaulic fittings on anything 2 1/2 inch and up.

NJJoe wrote:Anybody know about these tools and and can give some threading tips?


Put a pan under your cutting space to collect the chips and oil, then filter and drain the oil back into your squirter bottle to reuse (and also it doesn't get washed into a stream). Lowes has nice handy bottles w/ a squirt top, of the dark cutting oil.

Edit >>> Just remembered this >>> http://www.shorpy.com/node/21439
BunkerdCaddis
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yorker WC-90 or more likely a Van Wert VW85H [to be installed (soon, very soon)(well not as soon as I had anticipated]
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Waterford 105 pulling duty, Saey Hanover II getting dressed for the party
Coal Size/Type: pea/nut
Other Heating: oil fired hydronic

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Wed Apr 26, 2017 11:08 am

Perhaps someone here can help me with this? I need help with the math/formulas that are used in calculating the lengths of pipes when mating them up to fittings. For instance, you have a flat board with 2 holes drilled in it a foot apart. 2 half inch black pipe sections are inserted through. You use a wrench to tighten 2 90 degree elbows and now need a length of new black pipe to connect the 2 elbows.

I need to cut a length of pipe but it needs to be shorter than 1 foot because some of the length between the holes will be comprised of the 2 90 degree elbow fittings, some of that length will be threads on each side of the pipe. So what should the length of the connecting pipe be?

I realize that this question is perhaps getting into math that those working in pipefitting use everyday. I need this kind of data not just for 90 elbows, but what about 45s, 22.5s, tees, unions, couplings, reducers etc... What is this math/measurement called? Is there a chart or table ?

I know I can, through trial and error, measure what I need empirically, but I want to avoid that. Thanks
NJJoe
 

Re: Anybody Know How to Thread Black Steel Pipe?

PostBy: pintoplumber On: Wed Apr 26, 2017 1:02 pm

When working with pipe, we measure from centerline of pipe to centerline of pipe. If working with 1/2" pipe and your center to center measurement is for example 16", you subtract your fitting allowance which should be 1/2" for each elbow, making your piece 15" long. You determine your fitting allowance by measuring from the face of the ell to the centerline. Subtract how far the threads will screw in, and your measurement on a 1/2" ell will be 1/2" to 5/8". For your 45's, measure the center to center measurement and multiply by 1.41. Subtract your fitting allowance and cut your pipe. Dennis
pintoplumber
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham number series 17
Other Heating: Oil, forced hot air. Rheem