My GW 116

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: joeq On: Sun Apr 09, 2017 10:48 pm

I wouldn't think any more than 100-200 "/lbs (or an 1/8th of a turn passed finger tight) is necessary. Not like they'll be seeing much of a load on them.
(TOTP :cry: )
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired

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Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Apr 09, 2017 11:11 pm

The sand you have may not be fine enough ? Or, if you haven't screened it yourself, it was not screened to size well enough to work with those small nozzles. Some brands of blast media are sized very accurately and you can pour right from the bag into the blaster tank. Some not so accurately and you have to screen it before you can use it. Only takes one slightly oversized piece to jam the nozzle.

No you don't want the bolts too tight. The joints have to be able to move slightly as the stove heats and cools unevenly.

And lock washers won't hold for long. They originally used square nuts with flat contacting surfaces so that the four sharp corners grab the stove's surfaces and hold during heat cycling expansion/contraction.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Pauliewog On: Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:04 am

Also if your sand isn't really dry, or you don't have an air dryer on your compressor , you can clog up those smaller nozzles quick.

I had pretty good luck with the fine blasting media from Tractor Supply. It's a coal slag media very similar to Black Beauty but reasonably priced.

If you are using plain silica sand....... Please use a good resperator

Looking great and ..........Keep those pictures coming. :yes:

Paulie
Pauliewog
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:58 pm

Thanks for the blasting tips guys.

Once I ran thru the sand I did try the fine media from tractor supply with the same result. I don't know if that's because of some residual sand left in the tank. I also screened my sand thru an old window screen but still believe it might not be fine enough because the screened sand was still a lot chunkier than the tractor supply stuff. I did add a water separator at the inlet to the sand tank and I was surprised at how much water was actually being caught.

All in all it's not a huge deal as the 1/4" nozzle works fine - was just interested to see what difference the smaller nozzles would make. After this project the blaster might go down the road in lieu of another one with bigger capacity or maybe a cabinet or both. :o
philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:54 pm

Yeah,
1/8 inch nozzle is still pretty small for all but the smallest of the grit sizes in the fine range.

I use 7/32 nozzles with fine sand, and/or steel slag (Black Beauty) in my sand blaster. Same size with fine-sized glass beads or recycled glass in my blast cabinet.

It's a balancing act between having a nozzle big enough to not clog, but not so big that it needs a lot of air and overworks the air compressor.

As the compressor runs longer with less cool-down time as part of it's duty cycle, it starts to overheat the air. And the hotter the compressed air gets, the more moisture it can hold and the tougher it get that moister out before it mixes with the sand.

You'd be amazed at how much moisture is trapped in air coming from an overworked compressor. :o

I have a water/oil trap filter right after the shutoff valve at the compressor, large ID iron pipe for all the air line runs thought-out the shop to shed compressed air heat and get as much moisture as possible to condense out. Plus, all the air pipes are sloped toward water trap pipes with drains. And then, before each air pressure regulator station another water/oil filter, and then a coalescing filter, too. And I keep extra coalescing paper filters to swap out daily to let them dry. Even with all that, the coalescing paper filters, which are like a large roll of toilet paper, are wet from condensation at the end of a day of blasting in warm weather.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Wed Apr 12, 2017 8:09 pm

That's quite a set up Paul. I have a 60 gal compressor but only 5hp I think. Never really needed much in the way of drying the air but see where it helps. I basically use it for impact guns, die grinders, and such. I know dry air is better for the tools but with the low frequency of use, I just oiled good and went on my way. With blasting it's a different story; that things runs non stop and the water really accumulates.

I bought this compressor to paint an old truck I had when a Lowes 17 gal wouldn't keep up. At the time I figured the 60 would be all I would ever need. Funny how that worked out. . .
philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Pauliewog On: Thu Apr 13, 2017 12:57 am

I ended up installing an in line alternating pulse Desiccant Dryer in addition to the water seperator on my blast cabinet..

Even with that the red indicator will pop on after a few hours on a humid day. Like Paul suggested your best bet is to stick with the
larger nozzle if you don't intend to sandblast for a living. :D

Paulie
Pauliewog
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Sat Apr 15, 2017 7:21 pm

Paulie, I don't think I care to do sand blasting for a living. Maybe if I had a better set up but as is I'll pass! Let's just say the newness has started to wear off.

Got a little further today. Back pipe base was blasted, polished, cemented and put back together along with the ash drawer. After that I blasted the fire pot and polished the out side. I let the inside raw but was wondering if I should coat with some high temp paint to help with rust prevention or will it keep the refractory from sticking?

Any rate here's a pic. It's all sealed and bolted except for the pot. Safe to say I'm not setting any rebuild records! :D
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philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

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Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Pauliewog On: Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:00 pm

Even with the best equipment it's my least favorite part of the project. Although every now and then when I blast a really rusted piece and it looks like it just came out of the foundry.......... It does put a smile on my face. :D

Your stove is coming along great ! Don't worry about trying to set any speed records, just take your time and enjoy working on it. Remember. ..... It's a hobby not a job :yes:

I prefer to paint the firepot before installing the liner and never had a problem with the castable refractory not sticking. I'm not sure if it really helps or not. Do you plan to pour it or use a rammable refractory such as Noxram?

Paulie
Pauliewog
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:35 pm

Pauliewog wrote:Even with the best equipment it's my least favorite part of the project. Although every now and then when I blast a really rusted piece and it looks like it just came out of the foundry.......... It does put a smile on my face. :D

Your stove is coming along great ! Don't worry about trying to set any speed records, just take your time and enjoy working on it. Remember. ..... It's a hobby not a job :yes:

I prefer to paint the firepot before installing the liner and never had a problem with the castable refractory not sticking. I'm not sure if it really helps or not. Do you plan to pour it or use a rammable refractory such as Noxram?

Paulie


There is something satisfying about turning that rust into fresh cast iron.

I got a box of the rammable type from Wilson while I was up but have to admit that picture where you screwed the the bowl into the box with sand had me thinking. . . I will use the rammable stuff since I have it and Wilson gave me some tips for carving it up into bricks. I've sort of been dragging my feet because i'm not sure if I want to do the refractory before the barrel goes on or after. In a lot of the pictures I've seen, the refractory rolls up onto the lip of the door frame and I see accomplishing that as tough without it (the door frame) on. At least in a way that looks good.

Another issue I just got resolved was the new barrel. After talking to people and searching I found a local retired sheet metal guy that will do it. The guy is 78 but is out there everyday getting it done! He has all the right tools in not much more than a shed. He joked that it's so small that he has to go outside to change his mind. I should have that next week or so. He also said ash pans and an oval to round adapter would be no problem too so that's a plus. He told me when he got started in the business stove pipe was the bulk of what they did.

As far as enjoying it - I really do. Already looking for the next project.
philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Sun May 07, 2017 10:25 pm

Got my barrel back from the local tin knocker.
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philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon May 08, 2017 8:49 am

Looks very good Phil.

Not many tin knockers left. Especially those that have a heavy-duty bead roller. Can you post the shop's name and contact info so that other stove owners down your way will know where to get that kind of work done ?

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Mon May 08, 2017 10:15 pm

The guys name is Fred Baldwin located in Carlisle Pa. He's a retired one man band but stays pretty busy making duct work out of a small building in back of his house. He pretty much only has galvanized and copper so I brought the material for him to use.

I misplaced his number but will get and post it here for others that might be interested. He's close enough for me to stop by but I know that's not the case for everyone.
philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon May 08, 2017 10:34 pm

philthy wrote:The guys name is Fred Baldwin located in Carlisle Pa. He's a retired one man band but stays pretty busy making duct work out of a small building in back of his house. He pretty much only has galvanized and copper so I brought the material for him to use.

I misplaced his number but will get and post it here for others that might be interested. He's close enough for me to stop by but I know that's not the case for everyone.



That's great to know for anyone in the central PA area. Not many sheet metal shops left ,.... and fewer that will/can do that kind of work.

Michealanthony listed a shop up in Maine. Scalabro has used a shop to make the extended body of his Crawford, which I think is near him in Western Mass. I know Wilson has someone near him in RI.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: My GW 116

PostBy: philthy On: Fri May 12, 2017 11:43 am

philthy wrote:The guys name is Fred Baldwin located in Carlisle Pa. He's a retired one man band but stays pretty busy making duct work out of a small building in back of his house. He pretty much only has galvanized and copper so I brought the material for him to use.

I misplaced his number but will get and post it here for others that might be interested. He's close enough for me to stop by but I know that's not the case for everyone.


Fred Baldwin (717) 243-3394
philthy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker Lite

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