Choosing a Stoker

Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: SteelerCoal On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:09 am

Hi. I'm looking into the LeisureLine Pioneer and the Alaska Channing III stokers. Does anyone have any advice on either of these stoves? The Alaska is a little less expensive, but the Pioneer seems easier to operate. I'd be installing in my finished basement.

Thanks
SteelerCoal
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer Top Vent

Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:17 am

I'm sure you'll be happy with either unit, one great thing about buying a coal stoker from the established manuafacturers is there isn't a bad one in the bunch. :D

Most on the forum would suggest the LL because Jerry is around here quite a bit and does provide great service to his customers. He has his own forum below. Leisure Line Stove Company

Other than that I really don't want to say anything because I've owned neither and I try to keep my nose out of it mostly. ;)
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: SteelerCoal On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:25 am

Thanks. Both seemed good quality, but I am leaning towards the LL. Would you happen to know anything about the swg power vent? I'm wondering if I'd be able to make a horizontal run of about 8 ft. to my basement wall. So, the total length of pipe would be about 12 ft. (4ft. up from the stove vent, 90 degree elbow, then 8 ft to outside of basement wall).
SteelerCoal
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer Top Vent

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Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:32 am

I don't know much about the power vents however if you have an existing chimney you may want to consider power venting whatever you are using now (oil, gas..etc) instead of the coal stove. That's what a lot of people are doing. It will save a lot of wear and tear on the power vent and also keep the electric bill to run it to a minimum. A stove like the pioneer can provide most of the heat if not all of the heat for about a 2000 sq. ft home if you can get it to circulate good.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: LsFarm On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 1:02 pm

I'm pretty sure that you can vent the stove with the SWG over that distance,, but the long horizontal section of flue WILL collect fly ash, even if this was connected to a strong drafting chimney.

I would recommend installing a 'TEE' at the top of the 4' riser connected to the horizontal run. leave the open leg of the 'TEE' inline with the horizontal run.. You can install the Barometric damper on the end of the TEE, or just cap the open leg of the TEE. This will give you a very easy access to clean the long horizontal leg with a shop vacuum with a few extensions.

If you ask this question on the Leisureline forum Jerry can give you specific answers concerning the SWG.

The Leisure Line stoves come with the very nice Coal Trol stoker controler, and make running the stove a very simple operation,, LL gets my vote.

Greg L

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LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: SteelerCoal On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 3:47 pm

LSFarm - How often would you think it would need to be cleaned out the horizontal run? Is this an end of season thing, or would you think this would have to be done multiple times each season?
SteelerCoal
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer Top Vent

Re: Choosing a Stoker

PostBy: LsFarm On: Mon Jun 02, 2008 5:56 pm

The answer is 'it depends' don't Ya hate that?? :D

It depends on the amount of coal consumed.. the amount of fly ash will vary with the quantity of coal burnt.. I'd say at least once a season, or it culd be as often as every month or so..

From the standpoint of safety I'd just install the baro damper at the top 'ELL' or elbow location, then you can very easily look in through the door of the damper [held open with a finger] using a flashlight and see how much ash has accumulated..

I didn't mention, I'd also install a '
tee' at the exit from the stove, if this is a back vent or bottom vent stove,, if top vent, there will not be an exit elbow.. Then again, cap the extra leg of the TEE' and use this for a conveinent cleanout.

If you do end up cleaniing every month or so,, it will take only about 10-15 minutes to perform the cleaning,, with the capped tees it is really fast and easy..

Go through the 'Baro damper thread' and look for the photos that member 'wood 'n Coal' has there,, you will see that it makes access really simple.

Hope this helps,, Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Visit Lehigh Anthracite