Venting

Venting

PostBy: Len Basso On: Tue Jul 01, 2008 1:16 pm

I am new to this forum and I actually thought I posted this correctly last night but cannot find it....so sorry if you are getting the same thing twice.
Recently constructed a new home, 10' basement ceilings (unfinished), 1500 sqft on first floor and 1500 sqft on second floor. Second floor is not occupied and
we usually keep it at 55 degrees. Two high efficiency furnaces, (LP) one in the basement which heats the first floor living area, basement stays about 50 degrees with no heat (walk-out).
Second furnace is located in a utility room on the second floor. The LP price per gallon shot up from Nov. 07 (1.99) to most recently Mar. 08 (3.10).....spent about $3,800 to heat last year and
we still were cold. With some research from this site, just yesterday purchased a Keystoker Koker (160,000 btu) (direct vent) from the local dealer. koker will be located in the basement against back
wall (walk-out). Here is my question and I have received various answers from the local folks.....do I connect the Koker to my existing COLD or HOT air duct work in the basement ceiling for distribution up to the first floor living area? What is the best way to make the connection? I am going to assume that the radiant heat of the unit will keep the basement above the normal 50 degrees. Not worried about the second floor.

Certainly more questions to come.

Please help... Thanks!
Len Basso
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker

Re: Venting

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Jul 01, 2008 1:40 pm

Hello Len, welcome to the forum..

Any furnace will have both a cold air inlet and a hot air outlet.. Take a look at your current furnace instalations.. you will see cold air ductwork going into the furnace,, usually this is where the filter is located.. then the furnace's fan, then the furnace's heat exchanger, then the hot air Plenum.. branching out to all the various hot air ducts.. If you have central A/C, you will have an A/C evaporator just above the furnace in the hot air plenum..

So you need to hook into both the existing hot and cold ducts.. and you need to install a reverse-flow preventer.. something like a one-way valve in a water pipe.. this reverse-flow 'valve' needs to be somewhere between the duct connections of the coal boiler.. without a reverse-flow 'valve', the air pulled from the ductwork, heated by the Koker coal furnace and then blown into the hot air duct... this air will find it easier to go backwards through the existing furnace than to go through the many hot air ducts and back through the cold air ducts.. the loop through the existing furnace wil be shorter and less restrictive...

The above setup would be called a parallel ducted setup. You could remove a whole section of ducting and duct all the hot OR cold air through the Koker.. but I'm not sure that this would be easier or if it would cause flow restrictions for A/C or regular heat from the existing furnace..

Unless you are doing the install yourself,, I'd listen to several installers and get their oprion and listen to their suggestions..

Hope this helps.. Greg L

.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Venting

PostBy: Len Basso On: Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:51 pm

Thanks for the help......I am trying to get some ideas. Also, what do you think about just installing the koker in the basement, direct vent it out the wall and not connecting the unit to any of the existing duct work? If I leave the basement door open, will some of the heat still migrate to the first floor. I know for a fact that during the construction phase I was running a large salamander in the basement, left the basement door open and the heat definately crept up into the first floor living space to the point that it was very comfortable. With no furnace fan circulating the air.

Thanks again for the info, quite honestly I was surprised to find only one response.....should I post this in another category? Is my situation unique to the point where there are not alot of people connecting into the existing system??

Again, very grateful for any information.

Thank you.
Len Basso
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker


Re: Venting

PostBy: stokin-railroad On: Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:49 pm

Hi len and welcome,you will continue to get replies as people read,just takes a little time.i have a koker also i think you will be much happier with it hooked into your furnace duct work.mine is and it was 70*in the house all winter :D our heat is fha oil used no oil while coal was burning :lol: my dealer insisted i needed to connect to plenum of furnace but a friend with hvac experiance says that into cold air return will create a "natural convection"the way mine is hooked now worked well but i am changing for this season to cold air side.your floors will be noticably warmer first floor but connect to your furnace for optimal circulation to first floor.Good Luck,you will be warmer for a lot less $$$ :D
stokin-railroad
 
Stove/Furnace Make: keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: koker 160k

Re: Venting

PostBy: LsFarm On: Fri Jul 04, 2008 11:04 am

Hi Len,, it's summertime,, and 90% of the forum members are on the site only ocassionally,, so responses will be slow.

You want to pull cold air from upstairs into the coal furnace.. you don't want to pull cold air off the basement floor, this is the coldest air in your house,, and it will cost a lot more coal to heat this basement-floor air than warm air returned from upstairs..

Personally I would NOT direct vent [actually powervent] a coal appliance if you have a chimney.. the power vent MUST run all the time there is a fire, so with a coal unit this is 24/7... with oil, the power vent only needs to run when the oil burner is running,, which we hope will be almost never once the coal unit is installed.. So powervent the oil furnace,, chimney vent the coal furnace.

I still recommend hooking it in parallel to your oil FA unit, and using the ducts you have.. I'd do it right the first time,, 'cause it is so easy to 'just get by' and it may go that way for years... so I'd do it right the first time and then sit back and enjoy the heat...

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Venting

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Fri Jul 04, 2008 11:44 am

Build a block chimney with a liner and put the price of the power vent towards it. If you are handy or have really good friends, you could do it for the materials cost and some beverages/BBQ. If you have power outages you will lose the power vent and then the Koker. I suspect that power failure is not a problem if you have the HE LP furnaces that need power to vent also. The required maintenance of the power vent, noise and electrical expense is something to factor when considering the cost of chimney.

Future upgrade;EFM/AA/AHS boiler with a water to air exchanger in those two furnaces will give you heat to the whole house and domestic hot water. Your Koker will not loose too much value this winter so a trade up is very possible next year.

Not too many on the board when the temperatures are up and thoughts of heat are replaced by summertime fun. Some people are planning now for the winter and will be rewarded by trouble free coal heat when others are shivering in their oil heated igloos!
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: Venting

PostBy: Len Basso On: Sat Jul 05, 2008 9:48 pm

Thanks again for all of the advice....will keep checking back.
Len Basso
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker