new to coal

new to coal

PostBy: gtchief On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:12 am

I posted over on hearth.com and they pointed me in this direction. I'll just repost what I put over there and hope I can get some help.

I just bought my first house and along with it came an old coal burner. The only thing I found on it is “Benton” in larger letters across the door with an eagle below it. It has two dampers on both the ash door and loading door. I’d like to find out any information I can on it and would appreciate any help. There appear to be two bricks along the back that are broke and the bricks dont line the whole thing up to the top either. I know I need to replace the two broken, but are they suppose to be all the way up to the top of the stove? Does anyone know anything about this burner? Thanks.
gtchief
 

Re: new to coal

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:18 am

Pictures, if possible, of the outside and inside would be of some help.
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: new to coal

PostBy: Dallas On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:42 am

Firebrick would normally be to the height of the fire, plus a little. They are to protect the adjacent metal from burning or warping due to the intense heat from the fire itself. I would not expect them to go to the top.

In my opinion, a "cracked brick" isn't a real problem, if it is fairly sound and will stay in place. If you can find a new one for replacement, fine.
Dallas
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Modified Russo C-35
Other Heating: Oil Hot Air
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo
Stove/Furnace Model: Modified C-35

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Re: new to coal

PostBy: gtchief On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:58 am

Its cracked through and chunk of brick is missing. There is already warping in the metal from years ago. Should I be concerned about this?

I'll try to get some pics up later tonight.

I've been trying to do some ready and think I'm getting an understanding at how to operate. I'm pretty sure I want to control the heat of the fire by the dampers on the ash door and also the damper in the pipe of the stove. I dont really know of the damper in the pipe works, but do know that opening the ash damper will allow more air and create a larger fire. If I'm wrong in any of that please let me know. What do I need to do with the dampers on the loading door?

Thanks for the help guys.
gtchief
 

Re: new to coal

PostBy: Dallas On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 9:12 am

The damper in the loading door will reduce the burn of the fire. If the stove isn't real tight below the fire (allowing air under the fire), the loading door damper might be opened to reduce the burn at night or when heat really isn't needed.
There is a sticky post at the top of "Hand Fired" pertaining to pipe dampers.

The brick should probably be replaced. The warping should be inspected to see if anything is effected.
Dallas
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Modified Russo C-35
Other Heating: Oil Hot Air
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo
Stove/Furnace Model: Modified C-35

Re: new to coal

PostBy: BIG BEAM On: Thu Aug 28, 2008 4:43 pm

Has it been used lately.If not maybe you should have the chimney looked at and while your at it take the smoke pipe down and check for C&C(condition and critters).You know the old saying better to be safe than sorry.
DON
BIG BEAM
 
Stove/Furnace Make: USS Hot blast
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: new to coal

PostBy: gtchief On: Wed Oct 22, 2008 3:41 pm

Sorry I havent gotten back to this sooner. The stove was used just last winter before I purchased the house and I did find out it was built by a semi-local guy. I got fire bricks to replace the missing/badly broken ones and just have to cut two of them to finish that off. I do plan on getting the chimney cleaned before I start it up. I picked up a ton and a half of nut a few weeks ago and plan on picking up another ton soon.

I think the last thing I'm unsure of is whether or not I need to install a baro. There is a MPD in the pipe going to the chimney. If a baro would be better for me then I'll be happy to install one. Is there any specific orientation it needs to be in(ok in horizontal pipe)? Should I remove the MPD? The house is usually empty for 9 hours during the day if that affects anything. Should I install the baro?

Thanks, this site has given me a lot of great info so far.
gtchief
 

Re: new to coal

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Oct 23, 2008 8:52 am

If you burn anthracite, the baro is a must. I would avoid using the MPD at least until you have a little experience with your appliance, it can be problematic and in some cases, downright dangerous. Get yourself a manometer and some thermometers, you will be a pro in no time. The warped steel is not a problem.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: new to coal

PostBy: gtchief On: Mon Nov 10, 2008 1:32 pm

Well I started my burner up on saturday. It took me about an hour before I got some coal on there and then I started adding it in slowly until I had a full load. I put the baro in and got my thermometer and mounted it on the exhuast pipe. My house was about 63F on saturday afternoon and 73F by saturday night. So far it seems to be working great. I think I may have my technique down for loading it already too. Open ash door, open feed door, shake it down, fill er up, close the feed door, wait til temp starts climbing back up, and close the ash door. I've been running it at about 325 and the house is maintaining just fine. I had a full load go 10 hours yesterday before refilling and probably could have let it go another 2, but I was leaving the house for a while. I have one CO detector in the house so far and will probably get another one just to be safe. I think I'm doing everything right; the house is still standing. Thanks for your help everyone.
gtchief
 

Re: new to coal

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:10 pm

We'd still like to see some photos !! :)

It sounds like you are well up the hill on the learning curve.. There is no reason that you can't add coal whenever you want.. but if you can get on a regular schedule, you will find it easier to track changes in the burn characteristics with the weather changes and changes in coal, etc..

Glad you got it up and burning well..

Take care,, Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: new to coal

PostBy: titleist1 On: Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:19 pm

Way to go gtchief! Just for comparison, I am curious where and how you are measuring the 325* temp.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: new to coal

PostBy: gtchief On: Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:26 am

We're on a pretty good schedule it seems. Take care of it before bed, first thing in the morning, and as soon as I get home from work. I got a little scared the other day because it got pretty low on glow, but I was able to pick it back up luckily. I'm taking the temp on the vertical exhaust pipe that comes out of the top of the stove. Its about 8 inches above the stove top maybe. Should I be monitoring somewhere else or it doesnt matter as long as I keep it consistant? I'll try to remember to get some pics up.
gtchief
 

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