Switch from gas to coal help/guidance

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Mar 02, 2006 7:15 am

ktm rider wrote: so I have spent about $150 this year in coal.


That's so cheap it's ridiculous.... 8)

In case your interested Strawman prices for anthracite were about $120 in the summer for local delivery. Slightly less if you picked it up yourself. Prices vary depending on where you purchase, so does the quality.

For a 2000 sq foot home you are looking at approx 4-5 tons of coal per year. That's just a ballpark figure, amount can vary depending on the house. We burn year round but our furnace pre heats the hot water in the hot water heater so that very rarely runs. As I mentioned in another thread it's best to leave larger furnces run year round especially if your heating the hot water with them.

KTM Rider's cost is cheaper because he's burning soft coal, he's happy with it but most prefer anthracite even at the higher cost. He's probably usinfg a high quality soft coal...
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: strawman On: Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:17 pm

I was thinking that the anthracite does not produce so much smoke? I have contacted a local dealer that sales all types of furnaces. The outdoor one is the Mahonging? I have scheduled an appointment for them to come by and review my needs and see what would work best. I'll post the results.

AJ
strawman
 

PostBy: Berlin On: Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:42 pm

yes, anthricite is smoke free and a better choice for most people.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal


Add-on wood/coal burning furnace.

PostBy: Mega_Me On: Fri Mar 03, 2006 8:35 pm

Check this post out for some ideas. My house is only 4 years old, but this thread may give you some food for thought.

http://nepacrossroads.com/viewtopic.php?t=487&highlight=
Mega_Me
 

PostBy: ktm rider On: Fri Mar 03, 2006 9:59 pm

KTM Rider's cost is cheaper because he's burning soft coal, he's happy with it but most prefer anthracite even at the higher cost. He's probably usinfg a high quality soft coal...


Yeah, It's soft coal. Anthracite is extrememly hard to find in this area. Our soft coal must be of a high grade because it burns great and does not smoke much at all, even when first loading. everyone I know burns Bitiminous coal. it works very well for us. and the price can't be beat. :lol:

Strawman,

As I said in the previous post. Beware of the inflated burn times with outdoor furnaces. Believe me ! I was told 36 hrs. Which I thought well, I'm sure that should be cut in half. Which would have given me an 18 hour burn time.. WRONG !! It was 8 hours at best. To each his own though. I just would not want to see you shell out the big money and not be satisfied with what you have. It all goes back to how honest the dealers are. If he tells you 36 hours I would run away fast. If he tells you 12 + well. that is more realistic.
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: strawman On: Sat Mar 04, 2006 11:00 pm

I'm sitting here reading the post and my wife ask me what I'm doing. I tell her that I'm STILL researching the coal option. She ask me so how often do you really need to feed a coal furnace? Can someone help me out?

AJ
strawman
 

PostBy: kirk On: Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:45 am

I loaded my Harmon stoker boiler's hopper with rice coal this morning (Saturday) and I won't have to touch it again until Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. Coal is truly amazing, a perfect fuel for boilers.
kirk
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:55 am

strawman wrote:I'm sitting here reading the post and my wife ask me what I'm doing. I tell her that I'm STILL researching the coal option. She ask me so how often do you really need to feed a coal furnace? Can someone help me out?

AJ


Depends.... A hand fired unit generally requires attention every 12 hours. If you want to completely switch and not just supplement the heat then you need a stoker.

How often you need to feed it again depends. Set up properly it could go for weeks.... How long depends on the size of the hopper and the amount of ashes it can accumulate before they have to be removed. Most with a regular setup can go for about 48 hours during the coldest days. Ours for example is auger fed from a 55 gallon drum which can accomodate about 400 lbs. It's really limited by the amount of ashes though because the ash resulting from 400 lb.'s is not going to fit....

On the coldest days of the year we have to put coal on and remove the ashes about every 48 hours. During "normal" 30-40 degree weather it will go about 3 or 4 days. During the summer for weeks.

As I mentioned if set up properly you can have it go for weeks even in the winter. If you make your bin a giant hopeer to feed the coal to the furnace you won't jave to shovel a single piece. Trouble is most new furnaces are not auger fed but have a hopper right on the side of them which you fill with a shovel. It's a little below eye level so I don't know how you would set something like that up unless you had a really high basement ceiling.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: lime4x4 On: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:20 am

harman magnum stoker. I either have to tend to it once a day or once every 4 to 6 if the temps are warm..The hopper holds 100lbs of coal the ash pan will hold a little more then 100lbs of burnt coal
lime4x4