stove and stack temps

stove and stack temps

PostBy: pa coal cracker On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:43 am

It won't be long until I test fire the Mark II. Would someone tell me what kind of temps to expect?
pa coal cracker
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: MarkII and Mag Stoker

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: Devil505 On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 7:39 am

For a good test, make sure you fill it all the way up with coal to the top of the firebrick. Assuming it's cool enough outside to keep a good draw going, your stove/stack temps will be totally dependent on how much air you give the fire. If the stove is new, put a fan on exhaust in the room where the stove is because the stove paint will give off allot of fumes for a few hours until it cures.
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: Patrick On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 7:58 am

The Mark II is a great stove. We installed ours last spring and it burned for two months straight. With oil heat, we had the thermostat set at 68 or 62 depending on the time of day. The Mark II kept us at 72 min.

This is from the manual: "When and if the chimney pipes or connectors reach 500 degrees fahrenheit (maximum temperature), the stove is being overfired."

I kept a magnetic thermometer on the stove pipe about 5 inches from the back of the stove. Our average stack temp was 200-250. One night I opened the draft up more than normal. The stack temp was almost 400 and it was 83 degrees on our thermostat (25 ft away in another room). I woke up from being too hot upstairs. We were burning nut coal by the way. In the late spring, we were burning pea coal and would turn the stove way down. The stack temp stayed around 100 degrees. The stove wouldn't throw much heat at all, but would be ready to open up a bit when the temps dropped in the evening. This was around Memorial day with warm days and cool/cold nights here in Maine.

Patrick
Patrick
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

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Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: rberq On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 8:00 am

My Mk I will run anywhere from 250 F to 800 F, measured on the side near the top and front. If it's a new stove it will smell bad as the paint heats up the first time, and your wife will express her displeasure. Any way you can fire it in a garage or someplace like that for the first couple times?

The first time I fired mine, the gaskets on both doors stuck badly to the stove body, so it was very hard to open the doors and I was afraid the gaskets would be pulled loose. So I would suggest opening the doors briefly but frequently as it comes up to temperature. I don't know why it happened, maybe something to do with the paint curing?
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: Devil505 On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 8:39 am

This is probably a good time to mention a very important safety tip for newbies:

I'm sure your operator's manual will advise you to never open the ash door & then leave your stove unattended. ( If you forget, you will definitely over fire & probably damage your stove & you may even burn your house down!) When you get more comfortable using your stove, you will probably start taking short cuts like opening the ash door to quickly "freshen up" your fire, & then doing some quick chore in another room. Even though you intended to be gone for just a few minutes, it is very easy to get distracted & forget you have the ash door open!
What I do is always take a little timer/alarm with me, set to alarm in maybe 5-10 minutes tops. I can't tell you the number of times that has saved me from over firing my stove!
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: Cap On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 8:54 am

Once everything is settled down and simmering along.
Stack temps 175F
Hot air temps 250F
The harder you push it, the closer the stack will get to the hot air and your efficiency will decrease.
Good Luck.
Cap
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF 250, domestic hot water loop, heat accumulator

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: coalkirk On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 9:15 am

Devil505 wrote:This is probably a good time to mention a very important safety tip for newbies:

I'm sure your operator's manual will advise you to never open the ash door & then leave your stove unattended. ( If you forget, you will definitely over fire & probably damage your stove & you may even burn your house down!) When you get more comfortable using your stove, you will probably start taking short cuts like opening the ash door to quickly "freshen up" your fire, & then doing some quick chore in another room. Even though you intended to be gone for just a few minutes, it is very easy to get distracted & forget you have the ash door open!
What I do is always take a little timer/alarm with me, set to alarm in maybe 5-10 minutes tops. I can't tell you the number of times that has saved me from over firing my stove!


This is a VERY important caution that Devil has posted. Easy to get distracted as he says, even for an experienced coal burner. Don't want to come back and find a puddle of steel where your stove once sat. :shock:
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:30 am

A couple of light to moderate burns will 'season' the cast iron shaker grates.. one, very hot burn is not good for the first burn..
Seasoning of cast iron grates is something I learned about from the forum.. I think member coaledsweat had a good post about this..

I'm sure the paint on the door lip was causing the sticking to the door gaskets, you may want to spray some silicone or non-stick cooking oil on the gasket, this will help as well to keep it from sticking.

Greg L.

.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 4:14 pm

More on seasoning. Steel tends to have a grain like wood in a linear fashion that gives it its great strength. Cast iron, while being able to withstand much higher temperatures than steel has a grain structure similar to a sugar cube. It does not flex well at all. While steel can be repeatably bent back and forth many times before breaking, cast iron can only take a VERY small deflection and will promptly crack if pushed or impacted beyond its limits. This is much worse with a "green" (new casting) piece of cast iron. The low fire used to season it allows the temperature to come up slowly and evenly to allow the grains to softly align themselves with their neighbors and retain its strength, allowing it to cool slowly enhances the process and the service life of the grate. A hard firing will heat it quickly and cause hot and cold spots in the length, every one of these creates a weakened area that is prone to fracture similar to the point of a weld on steel. The weld is strong and the steel is strong, the weak part is where they meet (this goes back to the heating and cooling). Once warmed slowly and evenly the grain is "set" and can take repeated high temperatures without developing the stressed areas it would on the first firing. Seasoning the grate is really normalizing the metal to make sure the grains have aligned themselves and are ready to take on some serious heat without fracturing.

The same process is used for cast racing engines, it keeps the machined surfaces truer (the bores stay round, the flats surfaces remain flat) and that makes more power and lives longer as the metal stops moving around once normalized. In the old days, you looked for a motor that Aunt Maude drove 40 short trips a day. Start it, stop it (heat and cool it at fairly low temps), over and over for years, when Maude was done with it after 10-20 years, you had a nice stable engine block. Today, the block goes in the oven for a day and gets a long, slow increase, then hold and then a slow decrease in temperature giving you the best casting for a engine block that will not move around after you've spent a fortune machining it right where you want it.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: beemerboy On: Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:03 pm

http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/c346/3087/FAQ.html

How do you Season Cast Iron?

There are No Warranties on cast iron parts, all cast iron parts should be seasoned before using in a normal coal or wood stove fire. This can be done in two different ways. The first way is three to five small kindling fires in the wood stove. These fires should be small and in between each one the stove should cool. The second way for seasoning cast iron is taking the new piece of cast iron and placing it into your oven. Start the temperature of the oven at 325º and then every 30 minutes go up 25º until the oven reaches its highest temperature. Do not touch cast will be HOT. Then let the parts cool. After either of these steps are done, you are ready to start burning your stove.
beemerboy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: SAEY
Stove/Furnace Model: Hannover 1

Re: stove and stack temps

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Sep 15, 2008 6:00 am

Devil505 wrote: it is very easy to get distracted & forget you have the ash door open!
What I do is always take a little timer/alarm with me, set to alarm in maybe 5-10 minutes tops. I can't tell you the number of times that has saved me from over firing my stove!


Excellent advice...I was interrupted by a phone call last winter and walked away from the stove with the ash door open, when I came back I could hardly stand next to the stove. A few more minutes and there probably wouldn't have been much left. I now have a cheap egg timer that keeps me on track :D
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

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