Micro hydro

Micro hydro

PostBy: ktm rider On: Wed May 03, 2006 1:53 pm

Anyone ever look into micro hydro power for your home? I have been looking at this really closely and I am seriously considering it. I live in Md. and the power company is getting ready to raise our rates 73% in the next 3 years. I could power my whole home by using my creek for around $6,000.
I was just wondering if anyone here has actually tried hydro power. :lol:
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
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hydro and alternative power

PostBy: tjv On: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:21 pm

Have you gone to http://www.otherpower.com ?Lots of ideas and searchable posts from all over the globe and they do have a hydro power section.
tjv
 

PostBy: europachris On: Wed Jan 10, 2007 2:44 pm

I recall reading in a book years ago about home hydro about a fellow who used a Worthington centrifugal pump running 'reversed' as a turbine and belt driven to a AC induction motor in a grid tie arrangement. I think it was about a 15 hp motor. He had a pretty good head to his system.

I don't recall specifics, but I do believe he put in two electric meters, one for what he bought from the utility and one for what he put back to the utility after his local loads were satisfied.

I think it was a TAB published book, probably late 70's/early 80's date.

Chris
europachris
 
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PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Jan 10, 2007 3:00 pm

Shawn :the initial cost is one consideration, but what I would also look at closely is the yearly maintenance, and longevity of the setup.

It would be disappointing if it only lasted 5-8 years, and you ended up paying equal or more for your electricity via Hydro than provided by your local company.

What is your current yearly electric expense??

Take care, Greg

BTW: how cold are you up on your mountain the last few days?? 1/8-1/11th?

Greg L
LsFarm
 
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PostBy: ktm rider On: Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:31 am

Greg,

It hasn't been cold at all lately. We had about 3" of snow a few days ago and I think it was only 6 degrees that night but it warmed right back up to the mid 40's. it sounds like everyone is going to get a good blast of old man winter this coming tuesday. The local weather is calling for highs only in the mid 20"s !! That would been below zero usually here at night...

I have studied the longevity of the micro hydros and there is very little maintenance once it is installed, Usually just a yearly check and cleaning if I would go with the PM generators. I don't want to mess with the brushes on the generator anyway so I am going with the PM style for sure.. The average life span of the Turbine is usually right around 20 years. I can install the whole system for about $5,000 and according to my mesurements I can make right around 750 watts continious. That would be 18KwH a day and about 540KwH a month.
Last edited by ktm rider on Sun Jan 14, 2007 9:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: coal_kid On: Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:44 pm

Would you have to sell your power back to the grid? That wouldn't be a problem with me, if your system is down… you still have power.

I know it’s hard to imaging this winter, but I keep thinking what happens when you creek freezes up?
coal_kid
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:54 pm

If you make more power than you need, you can upload it to the grid. The law requires the utility to pay you for it.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
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PostBy: ktm rider On: Sun Jan 14, 2007 9:14 am

If the Micro Hydro system is a battery system you will have power no matter if the grid power goes out or not. You can then use the excess power for heat once your batteries are full. You could also heat your domestic water with the excess power.
If you net meter ( hook diectly to your electric meter ) you will NOT have power if the grid power goes out. This system uses the grid as a battery bank in a way. Some states do not allow net metering however.

The pipe ( penstock ) will freeze but you have to remember, moving water does not freeze near as quick as still water. So, it all depends on your exact weather. Most poeple in a hard freeze area bury the penstock.

I have been researching Micro Hydro for quite soe time now and I hope to be off the grid by next winter.
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: Yanche On: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:44 pm

coaledsweat wrote:If you make more power than you need, you can upload it to the grid. The law requires the utility to pay you for it.


Selling excess power to your utility company usually has large dis-incentives. You must have safety equipment to prevent feeding power to the utility company when there are downed power lines. You don't want the liability of electrocuting the service people! Such safety equipment is expensive. The other problem is in states where the electric utility has a big hand in setting the electric rates, the rates for buying back electricity is set very low. Hardly worth doing.

Yanche
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PostBy: ktm rider On: Mon Jan 15, 2007 7:22 pm

Yanche wrote:
coaledsweat wrote:If you make more power than you need, you can upload it to the grid. The law requires the utility to pay you for it.


Such safety equipment is expensive. The other problem is in states where the electric utility has a big hand in setting the electric rates, the rates for buying back electricity is set very low. Hardly worth doing.

Yanche


The entire system for a grid tie connect is only around $5,000 depending on how much penstock and wire that is needed. the safety devices are included in this price.
Yes, alot if the power companies set the buy back price low, but if you are going to do it solely for the buy back incentive it is not worth doing. Most people do it to eliminate the $150+ a month electric bills, which is why I'm going to do it. I'm not much worried about the buy back.
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Tue Jan 16, 2007 6:40 pm

Any goverment grants, incentives or tax breaks to add to this?
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PostBy: coaledsweat On: Tue Jan 16, 2007 6:43 pm

Are there any goverment grants, tax breaks or any other incentives available?
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
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PostBy: ktm rider On: Tue Jan 16, 2007 7:10 pm

No tax incentives as of yet. But you can get the incentives if you are in good with your alternate power dealer becuase there are incentives for wind and solar power. It'a all in how they write it up. :wink:

Of course I would never consider doing that...
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Tue Jan 16, 2007 7:21 pm

I'll bet written right, the Feds would hand out a grant for something like this. I remember in the '70s, somebody talked them out of $250,000 to do a study on why small children tip over on tricycles. That shouldn't cost more than $50. :)
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

micro hydro?

PostBy: keyman512us On: Tue Feb 06, 2007 4:08 am

...Define micro hydro?...lol
The stream/creek in your back yard could definately apply!
That is what I love about this forum....everyone here shares a basic interest-trying something different than the "jones's". I think everyone in here has a healthy quest for knowledge...and sharing of ideas.
...A few things to consider before you "develeop" your idea. First, do your local and state laws allow you to mess with that stream? I've thought the same idea you are thinking...unfortunately in this day and age you would probably be at odds with some governmental institution. If you damn up the stream....is anyone likely to complain from downstream?
...Water power is like Coal...it's old technology, but has potential. Many a New England factory,shop or mill have been powered by water over the years. The questions you have to ask yourself are: How much time, how much money am I going to invest...and what is the return?? If you are looking for a financial return...it will never happen. If you are looking for the return of "I set out to do it and it worked" then it might be priceless!
In other words...Is this a hobby with a slight payback? If so start with a water wheel, hooked up to a small alternator, and a few batteries.
...All depends on what you want to do with it.
....Have you ever heard the term "Pumped Storage?" This one amazes me! Out in Western Massachusetts, New England Power pumps river water at night to the top of a mountain (off peak-short money) when there is "extra power" for sale...and then during the day when demand for electricity is high (and someone is willing to pay good money), they let last nights water back down the mountain, turning the pumps into generators! And get this...they actually turn a profit doing it! Go figure it's a big battery for a coal plant when you think of it!...lol
...If you want solid energy alternatives...look into PV (photo voltaic). I know people here in town that get a check for $150/month from the light company..go figure!
keyman512us
 


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