New and clueless

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: WoodlandPA On: Wed Dec 17, 2008 3:02 pm

$500.00 huh? Yeah, that's a lot closer to my cost range. I'm really good friends with an excellent mason, so, maybe he'll cut me a break on the labor, or do it for free. Just wondering though...Any special type of brick I should be using? Where do I get a clay flue liner? How is it sold, etc. I've never seen or heard of these (Remember, I'm new LoL), and I'd like to get a local cost on materials.


The paper is KIND of close, but not close enough to singe it.
WoodlandPA
 
Stove/Furnace Make: National
Stove/Furnace Model: No clue

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: cArNaGe On: Wed Dec 17, 2008 4:35 pm

Where do you live?

I bought my supplies at a local Hardware/Home supply store. Not sure what size chimney you would need but they come in prefab blocks. I got the 16"x16" block for $3ish a piece. The flue fit in the block there were $10/piece. 3 block to each flue = $20 for 3 feet So if you go at least 15 feet above where your stove pipe goes in. $150 maybe in supplies ? Make sure you put a footer in for the chimney to set on.

Do a search for masonry chimney builds. Your in the same boat as me. I had a good friend who is a mason. Took him 3 12/hour days to build my chimney with me doing most of the labor. Mixing mud/ toting block. I stuffed a $100 bill in the ashtray of his truck cause he wouldn't take any money. And I bought a new trailer axle for his trailer cause his broke ( haven't givin it to him yet.)
cArNaGe
 

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: WoodlandPA On: Wed Dec 17, 2008 4:43 pm

I'm in Woodland, Pa. It's about 35 miles west of State College, and about five miles from Clearfield, Pa. That sounds awesome though. Three 12hr days...Wow, that's a lot of workin'. It's nice having friends like that, but, yeah, I wish they'd TAKE money every once in a while. Think I could get away with waiting 'till spring/summer to do that though? Not sure how well it'd work doing it in this cold, wet weather.
WoodlandPA
 
Stove/Furnace Make: National
Stove/Furnace Model: No clue

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Re: New and clueless

PostBy: cArNaGe On: Wed Dec 17, 2008 4:45 pm

My situation was different. It was through the middle of my house. We had to be careful and toting those 75 pound block up three flights of stairs was tough. :D
cArNaGe
 

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: braindead On: Thu Dec 18, 2008 1:15 am

Wow, thats an impressive old beast. Where does the fire get its air from? I don't see any inlets under the fire, like in the ash pan door--or am I just missing it somewhere?
braindead
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: yamaha On: Thu Dec 18, 2008 6:20 am

Call Swisher Concrete on the Clearfield/Curwensville Highway. They can fix you up with everything you need for your flu. I live in Grampian. About 25 min from Woodland.
yamaha
 
Stove/Furnace Make: DS Stove
Stove/Furnace Model: 3200

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: WoodlandPA On: Thu Dec 18, 2008 8:37 am

I talked to my friend, he said it'd cost me about $350.00 in materials from Swisher for a 20' chimney. That sound about right?
WoodlandPA
 
Stove/Furnace Make: National
Stove/Furnace Model: No clue

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: yamaha On: Thu Dec 18, 2008 1:45 pm

Yep, That sounds about right to me. They'll even deliver if you want them to.
yamaha
 
Stove/Furnace Make: DS Stove
Stove/Furnace Model: 3200

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: Softcoal On: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:46 am

I have a setup similar to yours in Ramey, PA. I have an old burnham cast boiler that looks alot like yours in an insulated room in my detached garage. I noticed that you said that you made a new ashpit and that it was solid the whole way around. I'm not sure how you are getting any combustion air under the coal to feed the fire other than leaving the ashpit door open, whitch could really let the fire get out of control and overheat the boiler if left unattended. I also had to make a new ashpit for mine, and the original had a damper on the side that controlled the air under the fire, so thats how the new one was made. I have the damper motor wired through an aquastat so it opens and closes the damper based on the boiler water temp, I have mine set so the damper closes at 180 degrees. This is my first year firing the old boiler and I'm no expert, but it would seem to me that if you don't have any way to get air under the fire it would go out rather quickly. Also, I only burn nut sized Bit coal in mine and I have found that the fuller I keep the firebox with coal the better the boiler runs. I keep it pretty full even on days that are not extremely cold and the damper on the ashpit keeps the water at an acceptable temp. I can usually fix the fire before I leave for work in the morning and when I get home 10-11 hours later the boiler is still at least 100 degrees. If it would help I could try to post some pics of the damper I was talking about. Like I said, I'm new to the coal thing and I'm no expert, but ther should be some way to get air under the fire to keep it going.
Softcoal
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Burnham
Stove/Furnace Model: model 17

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:03 pm

It would help to insulate the boiler and pipes also.

Richard
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: New and clueless

PostBy: WoodlandPA On: Fri Dec 19, 2008 6:40 pm

Well, I just bought three tons of cannel coal, and two tons of hard nut coal. That with the advice from you guys has got me going REALLY good. I don't have the new chimney up yet, BUT...I built up my fire, put about a four to five inch bed of red coals, then filled up the box with more coal. I didn't fill it the WHOLE way, but I put on another five to six inches of fresh coal on top. I left a smallish (Maybe 3" deep by 20" long.) and the temp was at 180*. I JUST checked on it, and it RAMPED up to about 230-240*. WOW!!! The OTHER garbage I was using would've had my temp at maybe 100* by now. Now, granted, I didn't build up the bed like I did this time, but this coal is AMAZING. I had the ashpit door COMPLETELY closed (Which still has a VERY small opening around the whole thing), and left the chimney draft open. After I checked on it, I closed the chimney damper about 75% of the way as well. I'm hoping this keeps the temp either steady, or brings it down a little bit. I'm REALLY confident that with the advice about the coal bed has DRAMATICALLY reduced the amount of time I'll be messing with the fire each day. Right now, I just have to "fine tune" how hot to get the fire. Thank you all for your wonderful advice, I'll keep you posted on how it's going.

-Mike-
WoodlandPA
 
Stove/Furnace Make: National
Stove/Furnace Model: No clue

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