stove size coal

stove size coal

PostBy: bigchunk On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 9:44 am

anyone using stove size these days. how is it burning in your unit? does it last well throughout the cold nights? could someone post a pic of a stove size piece and a nut size piece sitting next to eachother? thanks.
bigchunk
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: sf250 magnafire

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: channing On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 4:54 pm

I didn't know they made anything else. works fine for me. Some pieces are 2" to 3" on there longest dimention. but most of the ones are smaller.
channing
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark III

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: bigchunk On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:22 pm

yeah stove sizes are bigger than nut. isnt that great. someone said they burn realy well especialy at night during the realy cold bitter nights. i heard mixing the two together.. stove and nut is called range coal. maybe cause it ranges in size. my guess is that the pieces are about as big as baseballs or tennis balls. a decent sized rock. not crushed up as small as the nut size. but not big enough to handle with two hands. gotta find some.. need to find some.... total coal freak.
bigchunk
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: sf250 magnafire

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Re: stove size coal

PostBy: rberq On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:36 pm

I tried a couple bags of stove coal. The pieces were about the size of a bar of soap. It didn't do especially well in my stove, but that doesn't mean your stove would be the same. As with the question of pea vs. nut size, every stove and chimney combination seems to be different. The only way you will know is to buy a few bags and try it in YOUR stove. Some people mix nut and pea, so maybe you will want to try a stove and nut mixture also.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: bigchunk On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:46 pm

hey thanks for the info. a bar of soap... ok i can start to get a pic. thats interesting. pea size works in my stove i tried it last year i burnt 80 lbs of it at the end of the season. just to see how the shaking would be with the small pieces. its all good. i like the nut size in my stove and most likely will like the stove size as well. he he. :P
bigchunk
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: sf250 magnafire

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: TimV On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:51 pm

I am mixing Stove and Nut when it gets cold like the upcoming forecasted Arctic Blast
I find the Stove lets the coal burn a lot hotter if I add more air to the mix.
I also find if I just add Stove it takes off pretty fast and burns really well.
I have a large firebox.
One observation I did make was I still had large pieces of Stove burning nicely 2 or 3 days latter when I would stir up and agitate my fire from top to bottom to make the fine ashes drop so I could get rid of them.
As to the size of stove coal just go look into a bag of regular potatoes and thats about the size of them. Some bigger some a little smaller.
TimV
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Energy King Furnace
Stove/Furnace Model: 480 EK

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: coal berner On: Sun Jan 11, 2009 7:13 pm

bigchunk wrote:yeah stove sizes are bigger than nut. isnt that great. someone said they burn realy well especialy at night during the realy cold bitter nights. i heard mixing the two together.. stove and nut is called range coal. maybe cause it ranges in size. my guess is that the pieces are about as big as baseballs or tennis balls. a decent sized rock. not crushed up as small as the nut size. but not big enough to handle with two hands. gotta find some.. need to find some.... total coal freak.

Pea & NUt Mixes together is called Range coal in some Parts of the Coal Country area.Here are the standard size
Anthracite coal sizes . Note any size over the stove size is called Egg size and any size over that would be canal coal and then lump coal .

http://www.readinganthracite.com/mining_sizes.html


http://www.lcncoal.com/sales/size_usage.php
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
coal berner
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1986 Electric Furnace Man 520 DF
Stove/Furnace Make: Electric Furnace Man
Stove/Furnace Model: DF520

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: Mountainman37 On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:33 am

I will chime in here that my stove is "rated" for nut size coal, but I've got a good supply of free salvaged coal which I screen to remove the fines...which I discard. The majority is what you guys refer to as coal size as it is the size of medium potatoes, 3-4" long in some cases.

I'm still real new at burning any coal, but I will let you know after I get some burn time under my belt!

Mountainman37
Mountainman37
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 55 U.L.

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: gitrdonecoal On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:29 am

got a USSC hotblast. the firebox size is roughly 12 by 26 inches. i ve been burning the stove size cause as mentioned before, it burns a lot hotter, but you will go through a tad bit more stove than nut or pea. my furnace calls for nut, but burns the stove great. when its warmer i ll burn the nut size, and if it gets really warm in my house and i cant crank the air intake dowm anymore i ll just throw on a few scoops of nut to dampen it down that way. when it gets too warm to burn coal altogether i can burn wood in my furnace too :D
gitrdonecoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90
Stove/Furnace Make: USSC
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: bigchunk On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:04 am

i hear lots of good things about those hotblast furnaces.
bigchunk
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: sf250 magnafire

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: gitrdonecoal On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 3:57 pm

ha ha, i dont know if you are being serious or joking with me. a lot of people have gotten very fustrated with these units. i did at first, but i think it was just getting to know how to burn coal and not so much the unit. i love the hotblast and it heats my house beautifully, 23 outside and 74 inside
gitrdonecoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90
Stove/Furnace Make: USSC
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: Cato On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:38 pm

Stove size:

I have two tons of stove coal and 5 tons of nut. I generally burn nut but on colder days 'range' with a bottom layer of nut and top of stove. I find that the stove coal burns hotter and lasts just as long as the nut. I know people say it burns faster but I haven't noticed a difference in burn time. I have a Harmon Mark I and when I shake down I add a layer of nut and then add stove . By the time the stove coal reaches the bottom to be shaked out it has pretty well burned up. Don't start with stove coal and then add nut because when you go to shake down the ash the bigger stove coal may not 'break up' because of not being burned enough. The bottom layer of nut makes for easier shake downs.
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Cato
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman Magnafire
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman I

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: Dann757 On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 5:42 pm

I'm still learning. I got all sizes in my basement coal acquisitions. I love it, all in my greedy little hands....Blue coal, red coal, peacock coal. I like to burn the big chunks, but I am going to have to burn some of the smaller stuff as time goes on. Just the act of getting the coal and then shovelling it into the bin seems to make the big chunks end up on top of the pile. A significant percentage of fines in with it all. The big chunks seem to allow more air up through and can really get a hot fire going, especially a fresh fire. I have burned some of the finer stuff, it seems to temper the fire and not accellerate into a too hot fire as much. Amazing all the variables that come into play. I left my ash door open too long the other night and realized it when I smelled the adhesive burning off the black pipe where the bar code labels were! I think it was Fred that said you better start a kitchen timer if you're going to leave your ash door open! My stack temp was under 300* so I caught it in time; and it gave me a chance to see how to dampen the fire, I closed my ash door spinner all the way for a few minutes and the fire calmed down nicely.
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Re: stove size coal

PostBy: rberq On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 7:42 pm

Cato wrote:I have a Harmon Mark I and when I shake down I add a layer of nut and then add stove


Good pictures, guys. Cato, I also have a Harman Mk I so I am going to buy a few bags of stove size and add it on top of the nut as you suggest. We have had quite a stretch of cold here lately, so this will be a good time to test the hotter fires.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: stove size coal

PostBy: coal berner On: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:05 pm

Cato wrote:Stove size:

I have two tons of stove coal and 5 tons of nut. I generally burn nut but on colder days 'range' with a bottom layer of nut and top of stove. I find that the stove coal burns hotter and lasts just as long as the nut. I know people say it burns faster but I haven't noticed a difference in burn time. I have a Harmon Mark I and when I shake down I add a layer of nut and then add stove . By the time the stove coal reaches the bottom to be shaked out it has pretty well burned up. Don't start with stove coal and then add nut because when you go to shake down the ash the bigger stove coal may not 'break up' because of not being burned enough. The bottom layer of nut makes for easier shake downs.

If you would burn staight Stove Then burn Straight Nut you will feel and see the differents in the burn time .Stove will burn hotter but faster. Nut will burn slower but not with the same amount of heat as stove has . You are putting Nut first then you are putting on stove. The nut is slowing down the burn of the stove Just like when you burn Pea & then Put Nut
coal on. The pea will slow down the nut from burning fast . Anytime you put on the smaller coal first it will slow down the bigger coal from burning up faster then if you burned it straight. Also when you put nut on first and then put pea on to slowdown and hold the fire overnight . that is called dampening the fire . Goes back to when everyone used coal fired kitchen stove and potbelly stove heat troller . you would dampen the fire down by ptting on smaller size coal or coal ashes over the top of the fire only a little ash that would slowdown the fire untill morning came when you would shake and add coal .
coal berner
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1986 Electric Furnace Man 520 DF
Stove/Furnace Make: Electric Furnace Man
Stove/Furnace Model: DF520

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