My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Sat Sep 29, 2012 8:01 pm

SteveZee wrote:
echos67 wrote:Stove sure looks nice, great restoration for sure. Want to do another one ?

I hope your right about the cold snowy winter and I hope it shows up here too.


Ha,ha,ha Keith, You know you can't wait to dig into that #6 and make her new again ;-). It's a good plan to leave the nickel to last since it's cosmetic and pricy. You can always do it later if need be. The stove works just fine whether or not it shines. My little Star Herald just had the nickel parts rattle caned with "chrome" paint for the season. Now, it's going up over the barn to heat the apartment up there and when I send out a few pieces from the cookstove, those will go too.


I actually started taking mine apart this afternoon, spent a couple hours on it and made decent progress.

An interesting find I made today was when I started removing the liner in the fire pot, it had firebrick in it. They were concave to lay against the fire pot and there were two rows, one on top of each other. No idea how long they were in there or even if they were original but it would be interesting to know the story of them.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:18 am

Keith, Yeah wow that sounds like original equipment which is cool! Are any of them whole? If you could scavenge a whole one from each row, you could make a mold and use that powder to cast all the "brinks" ;) (as Fred calls em) :lol: that you need.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:20 pm

Unfortunately all the "brinks" came out in several pieces so remolding one would be very trying at best. They were rather thick and even though minimal I should gain some more area in the fire pot for more coal after I get it relined. Whatever they were held in with did a great job because it took a hammer and chisel to get the fire pot completely cleaned out before going in the sand blast cabinet.

I started taking pictures today for a restoration thead on my old no 6, when I get further along I may start a thread about it.

Back to your Oak 116, do you have it running 24hrs yet ? It is slowly cooling off here, maybe low 50's at night is all but it won't be long.

Also I'm interested in what you find best for your application, stove or nut or a mixture of both maybe, last year I ran all nut coal and may try some stove this year.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

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Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:34 am

echos67 wrote:Unfortunately all the "brinks" came out in several pieces so remolding one would be very trying at best. They were rather thick and even though minimal I should gain some more area in the fire pot for more coal after I get it relined. Whatever they were held in with did a great job because it took a hammer and chisel to get the fire pot completely cleaned out before going in the sand blast cabinet.

I started taking pictures today for a restoration thead on my old no 6, when I get further along I may start a thread about it.

Back to your Oak 116, do you have it running 24hrs yet ? It is slowly cooling off here, maybe low 50's at night is all but it won't be long.

Also I'm interested in what you find best for your application, stove or nut or a mixture of both maybe, last year I ran all nut coal and may try some stove this year.


Keith, Can't wait to see the resto pix of the #6! FYI check out Jason's Crystal Crawford resto thread to see the mold he made to recast firebricks for the CC. Pretty cool although for you with a fire pot like mine, I think the poundable stuff still is easiest.

Nope I have only fired the 116 up once with wood just last week to burn off and cure the finish etc... While it is getting a little cooler it's not time yet for a full time stove. yesterday, I ran the Jotul allagash propane stove down at the far end of the house and put a couple of armloads of scrap wood through the 208 Cookstove at the other end of the house. At 3pm it was 80 degrees downstairs so I let the cookstove go out. It was too much for me! I like that I can mix and match with the 3 stoves in line through the house. The 116 is in the middle and will handle the bulk of the chore when the time comes though.

As far as coal goes I posted a pix some where last week of the bin after getting 6 tons delivered. I get bulk coal so this is a mix of stove and nut. It's 4 tons stove and 2 tons nut and will be excellent for both the stoves. I think you'll find that #6 loving the stove coal. Here's the bin pix. That red line on the back wall is 6 feet high. The pile doglegs around the corner to the left there at the top about 4 feet too. Should hold me right though end of April and have a little left. You can see my bin will probably hold 10 tons of this mix. Next year I might top it just to see.
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SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: wsherrick On: Mon Oct 01, 2012 3:19 pm

echos67 wrote:Unfortunately all the "brinks" came out in several pieces so remolding one would be very trying at best. They were rather thick and even though minimal I should gain some more area in the fire pot for more coal after I get it relined. Whatever they were held in with did a great job because it took a hammer and chisel to get the fire pot completely cleaned out before going in the sand blast cabinet.

I started taking pictures today for a restoration thead on my old no 6, when I get further along I may start a thread about it.

Back to your Oak 116, do you have it running 24hrs yet ? It is slowly cooling off here, maybe low 50's at night is all but it won't be long.

Also I'm interested in what you find best for your application, stove or nut or a mixture of both maybe, last year I ran all nut coal and may try some stove this year.


I am at work right now, so I have to be quick. I am sneaking in the office for a second before I have to go inspect my train. Anyhow, the bricks in the Glenwood are probably original. You could order any Glenwood Oak or Base Heater with a brick lining or without. Some of them I have seen here still have the original brick liners in the fire pots. If you can save the original bricks that would be great, but; I wouldn't be heart broken over it if I couldn't. As long as the fire pot is lined, that is what really matters most.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:57 pm

Steve
I am following the restoration thread on the CC and the bricks are impressive along with the stove, if he could make the bricks in bulk I bet there would be a market for awhile :D I would buy a couple sets and cement one set in and keep the other for spares !

I envy you with such easy access to the large pile of heat you have.


William
Thanks for the lesson, pretty interesting knowing they were probably original at 100+ years old. That explains why they came out in so many pieces too :lol: . Goes to show the value of a lining in the fire pot, without it I doubt it would still be in service.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:48 am

That's right Keith, It's the key to longevity for the pot. Like you said though, with the clay, you can make it a little thinner than the bricks and add some volume to your coal bed. I think mine is probably an inch thick which is plenty and maybe could have been half that in all honesty. I wanted to insure it wasn't going to crack but if i was to do it again I'd go a hair thinner. As long as the pot's protected, you're good. That 1 inch liner in a round pot takes me down to 14" of usuable volume. Then again maybe 1/2" is not enough? Richard or William or any of the smart guys ;) will know how thick and why. I probably overbuild mine a bit though which is just in my nature.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 1:29 pm

SteveZee wrote:That's right Keith, It's the key to longevity for the pot. Like you said though, with the clay, you can make it a little thinner than the bricks and add some volume to your coal bed. I think mine is probably an inch thick which is plenty and maybe could have been half that in all honesty. I wanted to insure it wasn't going to crack but if i was to do it again I'd go a hair thinner. As long as the pot's protected, you're good. That 1 inch liner in a round pot takes me down to 14" of usuable volume. Then again maybe 1/2" is not enough? Richard or William or any of the smart guys ;) will know how thick and why. I probably overbuild mine a bit though which is just in my nature.


Just a note. The liner I made over the steel liner that I already put over the fire pot is about 3/8" cause I didn't want to go too thick. I used the same castable stove cement used to make the Golden's line but without a mold. I made the mix more heavy and apply it with a small putty knife, and it was staying on the almost vertical wall. We will see if a so thin liner can endure the heat after some real ant fires.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 4:21 pm

nortcan wrote:
SteveZee wrote:That's right Keith, It's the key to longevity for the pot. Like you said though, with the clay, you can make it a little thinner than the bricks and add some volume to your coal bed. I think mine is probably an inch thick which is plenty and maybe could have been half that in all honesty. I wanted to insure it wasn't going to crack but if i was to do it again I'd go a hair thinner. As long as the pot's protected, you're good. That 1 inch liner in a round pot takes me down to 14" of usuable volume. Then again maybe 1/2" is not enough? Richard or William or any of the smart guys ;) will know how thick and why. I probably overbuild mine a bit though which is just in my nature.


Just a note. The liner I made over the steel liner that I already put over the fire pot is about 3/8" cause I didn't want to go too thick. I used the same castable stove cement used to make the Golden's line but without a mold. I made the mix more heavy and apply it with a small putty knife, and it was staying on the almost vertical wall. We will see if a so thin liner can endure the heat after some real ant fires.


Pierre,

Yes I'm curious also to see how that works. I told Keith that I thought you couldn't mix it the castable thick like you did but looks like I'm wrong (Not the first time :D ). I was temped to go thinner too (1/2" liner) and in a way wish I had because I could put that much more coal in. In my case, the stove might be on the large side for the space anyways, so losing the 2" (16" to 14") will not be a problem. I made mine 1" thick which of course on a round pot takes off 2". I wonder if mine is over kill? Maybe you just protect the pot from live coals touching or maybe there is an advantage to the insulating? Richard will know.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:08 pm

My belief is that the major advantage of the lining as far as burning goes is to keep heat in the fire pot. Its not as good an insulator as insulating fire brick, which is too soft, but will lessen heat loss in the fire pot which makes holding a low fire much easier as well as protecting the fire pot at higher firing rates. Start up should be quicker and there will be less air required at any firing rate. A dying fire always dies around the edges first because of the heat loss, leaving unburned coal.

William has reported how well his small Glenwood works. That stove has the fire pot totally enclosed within the stove body to lessen heat loss.

The perfect stove would have no heat loss in the fire pot; all heat exchange being done in the area provided for it.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:32 pm

That makes sense Richard. That said, I guess my inch thick liner wasn't overkill and should help to insulate, particularly because these Glenwood #6 and MO 116 are exposed (under the bottom skirt) firepots styles.
That simpler Base Burner style is probably the most efficient design of all and it has less moving parts. The fire pot is isolated, there is a slotted ring above the pot and the damper flap is in the collar between the stove and back pipe instead of in a divided pipe. Close that damper and the exhaust is forced down around the pot into the ashpit and up and out the backpipe which needs no divider. It's brilliant.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:54 pm

I was able to find some boiler cement today rated at 3200*, it is the air setting boiler cement used in kilns, boilers and so on.

I was able to locate it at a supply house for heating and cooling. I just made it to the store on my way home tonight and the door was locked at 4:25pm, thankfully the guy inside opened the door and sold me a gallon for $13 and some change.

Very thick consistency but I don't think it is thick enough I actually need to pound it in with a rubber mallet. The directions say use a couple layers, the first being thin to fill the pores and then a thicker after the first is dry. I think I will go a solid 1/2" when completed which will take a 16" firpot to a 15".

Richard, your saying bricks are better then the castable style ? I would think the other way because the bricks seem more porous and less insulating, I don't remember for sure but thought castable has ceramic in it which is a great insulator. Mine is in the garage and I will read the ingredients tomorrow when I'm out there again.

Steve, we know now it's can be mixed thicker :lol: .
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:26 pm

Keith cool that you got some although mine was in a box and was like a solid block like clay ( they call it plastic-alumina material) with grit in it like small gravel bits. I think those bricks are quite thick is why Richard said that, but it might be the composition. I'm with you though as mine is also rated at 2800-3000 degrees. They make crucibles, foundries and kilns with it so for a coal stove it's not even stretching it's legs.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:42 pm

Steve, for the Golden I also went for a 1" liner, so 12" to 10" and the stove worked perfectly with small to high heat fires. No cracks just like new after one year.
As Richard said keeping as much heat as possible inside of the fire pot is the way to go.
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nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:35 pm

I mentioned insulating fire brick which originally were made from Kaolin clay with saw dust mixed in. When baked the saw dust burnt out leaving thousands of pockets of trapped air. You can hold a brick with one hand and play a torch on the other side and not feel the heat. They are soft and easily cut with a hand saw, so not very good for coal stoves, but would be good as a baffle for coal or wood where the fuel does not come in contact to reflect heat back into the fire.

Jewelers keep a block of charcoal on their bench to use when silver or gold soldering. The charcoal reflects back the heat and makes soldering a lot easier. An insulating fire brick has the same effect and makes silver soldering possible with small torches on work normally too large for the torch.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

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