Power Vent Systems

Power Vent Systems

PostBy: caucapon On: Thu Jan 17, 2008 5:16 pm

Hi,

New to this forum; but, I've heated extensively before using coal. My wife and I ran a Vermont Castings coal unit and a Monarch coal furnace to heat a large Victorian in Medford, N.J. back in the seventies and eighties.

We recently moved into a 2400 sq. ft. log residence in Wytheville, Va. We're in climatic zone #6, up 2300 feet above sea level. Winter temps apparently get as low as zero degrees with some regularity. We are seriously considering going back to coal. I've been surfing this forum as well as other online sites for info. Today's stoves are much improved over what we are used to, at least in terms of convenience.

I see that several stove manufacturers offer power vent systems for their products. How well do these forced venting systems work? How reliable are they?

I also see that the Alaska Stove Co. offers something called a direct vent (as opposed to power vent). What is the working principle behind this type of venting? How well does it work? How reliable is it?

When all is said and done, do most of you feel that a standard vertical chimney is still the best venting system available? If so, why?

I thank in advance everyone who responds. Your answers will provide meaning info upon which I can base a purchase.

Al Jarvis
caucapon
 

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: Matthaus On: Thu Jan 17, 2008 5:38 pm

Welcome to the forum al, you will find that Direct Vent and Power Vent can be used interchangeably in a most confusing manor. :cry: I have provided the generally accepted descriptions for each. I'm sure others will chime in to provide their particular views. :)

The Power Vent is a vent unit that mounts on the side of the building and pulls the flue gas out, there will be a barometric damper near the stove on this type installation to regulate draft and the fan speed is usually controlled by a rheostat to prevent excess heat from being lost out the stack. This type unit is available with the Leisure Line stoves as well as Alaska. You can purchase a SWG 4HDS power venter and adapt it to almost any kind of stoker with the right instructions. Jerry at Leisure Line owns the UL listing for use of this type of vent on a coal stove.

The Direct Vent is a unit mounted on the stove (bottom rear) that pulls gas out of the stove and sends it out a 4" pressurized pipe. This type unit is available on the Keystokers and Alaska stoves, and can use a barometric damper before it or a calibrated leak to ensure proper draft. The disadvantage of this type is that the pipe is under pressure in the house and has to be sealed really well or you will get CO around it. :sick: The Harman Direct Vent (DVC 500 stoker)is a different type that actually pulls outside air as part of the process and can be found on the Harmon website.

As far as reliability, with proper maintenance the Power Vents and Direct Vents can last for up to 5 years without replacing parts. I personally have been using a SWG 4HDs on my stoves (have had it hooked to an Alaska, Harmon and Keystoker) in the house for 1.5 years.

Whichever type you use should be rated by the manufacturer for your stove and be checked with a manometer or draft meter for proper operation. I us a manometer permanently hooked up to monitor the rheostat position and verify sufficient draft.
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Jan 17, 2008 6:00 pm

caucapon wrote:When all is said and done, do most of you feel that a standard vertical chimney is still the best venting system available? If so, why?


Yes, a vertical chimney wins hands down, especially if it is masonry.

The service life exceeds anything else and it doesn't stop working because the power is out.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: av8r On: Thu Jan 17, 2008 6:51 pm

coaledsweat wrote:
caucapon wrote:When all is said and done, do most of you feel that a standard vertical chimney is still the best venting system available? If so, why?


Yes, a vertical chimney wins hands down, especially if it is masonry.

The service life exceeds anything else and it doesn't stop working because the power is out.


The K.I.S.S. method can rarely be improved on.
av8r
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Hearth with twin turbos (sounds like it)
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth model with twin turbos

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: budboy24 On: Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:19 am

I purchased a Leisure Line Stove including the Power Vent three years ago. I have had absolutely no problems with the venting system moving it this fall from the family room into the diningroom. It now heats the entire 1400 sq ft ranch home and my oil furnace has not kicked on once all winter ( lowest temp outside -5 degrees). The power vent is not difficult to install and I havent smelled any fumes for three years. It of course comes with a required CO2 detector. Make sure you look on leisure lines website (leisurelinestoves.com) to give you instructions and guidelines for where and how to install the power vent. I bought the econoline, their most ecomomical model and the heat theat it generates is quite impressive. I would recommend the power vent.
budboy24
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line Stoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Econoline

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: WNY On: Wed Jan 30, 2008 8:49 am

The biggest thing on any type of stove is the yearly maintenance after shutdown, clean, lube, vacuum etc...that keeps all the parts working the way they should for next season.
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:56 pm

Matthaus,

Did you have any problem installing it on the keystoker ????

Looks like we will be driving up to see Jerry this Saturday to pick one up for my son's Keystoker 90 that he just bought used.

Just trying to anticipate any potential problems that might come up.

He is anxious to get it going but we want to do it correctly. The only potential "fly in the ointment" may be that the borough where he lives may require a permit and code inspection before he can fire the bugger up.


Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: Matthaus On: Thu Jan 31, 2008 12:57 am

Rick 386 wrote:Matthaus, Did you have any problem installing it on the keystoker ? Looks like we will be driving up to see Jerry this Saturday to pick one up for my son's Keystoker 90 that he just bought used.


Hi Rick, the unit you are purchasing comes from the best source (the owner of the UL listing for PV use with solid fuel burning appliance). As others have stated the instructions come with the unit and you should have an easy time. Make sure you install enough CO detectors. I like to have them outside each sleeping area in the house and a digital read out type right by the stove. Also as mentioned you should purchase a means to measure the draft (a draft gauge or manometer).

I have installed two power vents (one in the garage and one in the house), the install has less to do with the particular stove then the basics of the install. Make sure you have a barometric damper, make sure you have a rheostat to control the draft, and make sure you have method to measure the draft and check it often.

Hope you are able to fire up the stove this weekend. Keep us posted. :)
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: traderfjp On: Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:24 am

I would add that the power venter is probably a lot quiter than a Direct vent since the motor sits outside. Also, my stove has a fan to wash the heat off the stove and that is a bit noisy too and is usually louder then my DV motor.
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: vegeta_ban On: Wed Nov 14, 2012 3:55 pm

Matthaus wrote:Welcome to the forum al, you will find that Direct Vent and Power Vent can be used interchangeably in a most confusing manor. :cry: I have provided the generally accepted descriptions for each. I'm sure others will chime in to provide their particular views. :)

The Power Vent is a vent unit that mounts on the side of the building and pulls the flue gas out, there will be a barometric damper near the stove on this type installation to regulate draft and the fan speed is usually controlled by a rheostat to prevent excess heat from being lost out the stack. This type unit is available with the Leisure Line stoves as well as Alaska. You can purchase a SWG 4HDS power venter and adapt it to almost any kind of stoker with the right instructions. Jerry at Leisure Line owns the UL listing for use of this type of vent on a coal stove.

The Direct Vent is a unit mounted on the stove (bottom rear) that pulls gas out of the stove and sends it out a 4" pressurized pipe. This type unit is available on the Keystokers and Alaska stoves, and can use a barometric damper before it or a calibrated leak to ensure proper draft. The disadvantage of this type is that the pipe is under pressure in the house and has to be sealed really well or you will get CO around it. :sick: The Harman Direct Vent (DVC 500 stoker)is a different type that actually pulls outside air as part of the process and can be found on the Harmon website.

As far as reliability, with proper maintenance the Power Vents and Direct Vents can last for up to 5 years without replacing parts. I personally have been using a SWG 4HDs on my stoves (have had it hooked to an Alaska, Harmon and Keystoker) in the house for 1.5 years.

Whichever type you use should be rated by the manufacturer for your stove and be checked with a manometer or draft meter for proper operation. I us a manometer permanently hooked up to monitor the rheostat position and verify sufficient draft.

Matthaus, hello,

Could you possibly point me in the right direction to hook up a manometer like you did? Also is it one of those Dwyer with the red fluid?

Thank You
vegeta_ban
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pocono bottom vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice is so nice
Other Heating: Oil, yuk on the price

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Thu Nov 15, 2012 10:37 am

vegeta_ban wrote:Matthaus, hello,

Could you possibly point me in the right direction to hook up a manometer like you did? Also is it one of those Dwyer with the red fluid?

Thank You



Here's the original thread where Matt helped me get my son started with his Keystoker:

SWG Power Vent on a Keystoker


Almost all of us here use the Dwyer Model 25 manometer. http://www.grainger.com/product/DWYER-I ... Pid=search

You can also find them on ebay or other locations.

The Dwyer comes with a fitting and tubing that you can just drill a hole in the pipe and thread the fitting in to. Do a search for manometers here and you will see all types of installations. In that original thread, I just drilled the fitting into the kid's pipe. I did the same for the AA 260 at home. Both were a permanent install so we can constantly monitor the draft.

If you still have questions, feel free to post them. That is what we are here for.

And welcome to the forum. :clap:




Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Power Vent Systems

PostBy: vegeta_ban On: Thu Nov 22, 2012 11:46 pm

Rick 386 wrote:
vegeta_ban wrote:Matthaus, hello,

Could you possibly point me in the right direction to hook up a manometer like you did? Also is it one of those Dwyer with the red fluid?

Thank You



Here's the original thread where Matt helped me get my son started with his Keystoker:

SWG Power Vent on a Keystoker


Almost all of us here use the Dwyer Model 25 manometer. http://www.grainger.com/product/DWYER-I ... Pid=search

You can also find them on ebay or other locations.

The Dwyer comes with a fitting and tubing that you can just drill a hole in the pipe and thread the fitting in to. Do a search for manometers here and you will see all types of installations. In that original thread, I just drilled the fitting into the kid's pipe. I did the same for the AA 260 at home. Both were a permanent install so we can constantly monitor the draft.

If you still have questions, feel free to post them. That is what we are here for.

And welcome to the forum. :clap:




Rick

Thank You very much Rick! That is some great information. I got to get reading. This is such a great forum.
vegeta_ban
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pocono bottom vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice is so nice
Other Heating: Oil, yuk on the price

Visit Lehigh Anthracite