Gas Line to close to Coal / Wood Stove

Re: Gas Line to close to Coal / Wood Stove

PostBy: littlefish On: Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:04 pm

density of natural gas is approx 0.7, propane is approx 1.7, each depending on producer and blends. thus, Nat gas rises, propane settles. this changes the nature of detection and how accidental ignition occurs.
littlefish
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: nut
Other Heating: oil/baseboard

Re: Gas Line to close to Coal / Wood Stove

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:27 pm

Natural gas is the 'safe' gas...
Propane will settle down to the low point...
and find flame...
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: Gas Line to close to Coal / Wood Stove

PostBy: EarlH On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 1:05 am

Smokeyja wrote:When electricity was coming around into homes they made a lamp that was sold as a gas/electric lamp . You could turn the light bulb on or use gas... Talk about dangerous ... BOOM!

For the record I still don't trust natural gas in any building.


The reason for combination fixtures was that until radio, most power plants shut down between 5 and 9 in the evening when the factories closed down for the day. It wasn't until the mid to late 20's that most smaller towns had electricity through the night. The town I live in had 25,000 people in it and although they did light up the street lights all night, they didn't offer 24 hour electricity to most of the homes in town until around 1930 and radio and by the early 30's refrigerators were the biggest reason for that. It's kind of funny really. And the gas for the light fixtures was illuminating gas, which my Dad used to say was generally acetylene or sometimes carbide depending on the situation. And the gas light was much brighter than those early carbon filament light bulbs were.
I used to have a home building magazine from the late 1890's and it showed a sort of birdseye view of a town in the middle of the winter and you could see all the baseburner stoves through the windows in the "community" and one house shooting up into the sky like a rocket while one of the neighbors saying something about "I wonder how the Jone's are getting along with thier new gas furnace?" Ha! I should see if I still have that and show it to my insurance guy...
EarlH
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Favorite 261, Columbian Joy A2
Coal Size/Type: Favorite-16" firepot; Columbian Joy-12"

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Re: Gas Line to close to Coal / Wood Stove

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 1:21 am

EarlH wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:When electricity was coming around into homes they made a lamp that was sold as a gas/electric lamp . You could turn the light bulb on or use gas... Talk about dangerous ... BOOM!

For the record I still don't trust natural gas in any building.


The reason for combination fixtures was that until radio, most power plants shut down between 5 and 9 in the evening when the factories closed down for the day. It wasn't until the mid to late 20's that most smaller towns had electricity through the night. The town I live in had 25,000 people in it and although they did light up the street lights all night, they didn't offer 24 hour electricity to most of the homes in town until around 1930 and radio and by the early 30's refrigerators were the biggest reason for that. It's kind of funny really. And the gas for the light fixtures was illuminating gas, which my Dad used to say was generally acetylene or sometimes carbide depending on the situation. And the gas light was much brighter than those early carbon filament light bulbs were.
I used to have a home building magazine from the late 1890's and it showed a sort of birdseye view of a town in the middle of the winter and you could see all the baseburner stoves through the windows in the "community" and one house shooting up into the sky like a rocket while one of the neighbors saying something about "I wonder how the Jone's are getting along with thier new gas furnace?" Ha! I should see if I still have that and show it to my insurance guy...



Hey that's some really cool history ! Thanks for sharing ! Please do share that image if you find it!
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

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