The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: half-pint On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 1:41 am

echos67 wrote:
half-pint wrote:
echos67 wrote:Jason,

Stove looks very nice,

Have any pictures showing the inside of those doors where the handles have been removed for plating ? My handles were pretty persistent about staying on the doors. This spring I may remove mine for plating and tap the handle for a bolt when I put it back together with the latch (pawl).



I'll get you some pictures of the inside of the doors this afternoon when I get back from the Dr. Anything you need a picture of I can get. The stove is under fire so all I can't get to are the grates. ;) I didn't do the restoration of the stove. That was done by BarnStableStove. :D

Jason


Much appreciated Jason, the picture in the link to your other thread before Doug did the restoration looks like it shows the loading door handle was previously plated but its hard to tell about the ash pan door handle ? I will go back and read that thread later this evening.
I may have to light off my stove tonight :o !




Here are the pics of the inside of the doors. Doug took my handles off and then welded them back together after they had been replaced. Personally, I think welding is stronger, but tapping and putting in a screw would make it easier to work with. Sorry one of the pics is sideways. I tried rotating it several times and it just isn't working for me tonight.

Jason
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half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: half-pint On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 2:03 am

I am planning another experiment with my Scarlet. I've been burning Blaschak in her so far in a 60/40 mix of stove & nut sized. I had the wood grate so I just had to try wood. It burns it well but it is just too messy for my taste. Now I am going to give a try at burning some high quality Kentucky Bituminous coal in her and see how it goes. If it goes well it could save me a ton of money. It's been awhile since I've burned any Bit in anything so this may go good or go really bad one of the two. No worries I'll have a bucket of sand, fire extinguisher, and two of those sticks to put out chimney fires with in case things get too out of hand. I'm going to try it in direct draft only at 1st until I see how things are going to go before I try the baseburner. (Don't want to clog the tubes with soot.) I believe though that after slowly loading it and waiting for most of the volatiles to finish burning off I might be able to use the baseburner with little trouble. If the Bit turns out to not work good in her I'll have Christmas Stocking Stuffers for everyone I know next Christmas. :D

Jason
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: echos67 On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 7:20 am

Thanks for the pics Jason, interested to see how your bit burning experiment goes.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

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Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: Tim On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:01 pm

Jason,
I hope your experiment goes well but I think you will find it a TERRIBLE mess....I also tried to burn some good screened and washed PA Bit "NUT" size in my #30, thinkin of $$$ savins as you are and here is my tale!
I got 2 5-gallon buckets to try in it and the smoke,clinkers,back flashes and other problems that came rushing at me were NOT worth the trouble...I threw the rest of the 5 gallon buckets down over the bank.....you will quickly destroy your refactory lining tryin to bust up the bridged over mess that will cover your burn pot and down inside in like 3 hrs. Bit will not just slide down the refactory lining like anthracite it sticks, clinks and bridges something fierce forcin you to go at it with a poker! and well the rest is just nothing buit a PIA!...I hope your experiment goes better but I have my reservations.
After like 20 or 30 lbs. in my experiment ...i was back on my Anthracite Nut so fast u cannot imagine!
My Glenwood is super happy on Good Ol PA Anthracite...nut size is biggest I can get here but would love to try some Stove size if it was available.
Today its a Balmy 18 degrees outside and my Glenwood is munchin on 20/25 lbs of Nut per day and is CLEAN ..I must state this again verses "BIT COAL" CLEAN!...and just purrin away makin nice warm heat these units were desighned and built for anthracite and they are NOT bituminous friendly :mad: .
post your results please as I got smacked down when I tried Bit in my Glenwood.
Thanks,
Tim
Tim
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak #30

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: half-pint On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:45 pm

Tim wrote:Jason,
I hope your experiment goes well but I think you will find it a TERRIBLE mess....I also tried to burn some good screened and washed PA Bit "NUT" size in my #30, thinkin of $$$ savins as you are and here is my tale!
I got 2 5-gallon buckets to try in it and the smoke,clinkers,back flashes and other problems that came rushing at me were NOT worth the trouble...I threw the rest of the 5 gallon buckets down over the bank.....you will quickly destroy your refactory lining tryin to bust up the bridged over mess that will cover your burn pot and down inside in like 3 hrs. Bit will not just slide down the refactory lining like anthracite it sticks, clinks and bridges something fierce forcin you to go at it with a poker! and well the rest is just nothing buit a PIA!...I hope your experiment goes better but I have my reservations.
After like 20 or 30 lbs. in my experiment ...i was back on my Anthracite Nut so fast u cannot imagine!
My Glenwood is super happy on Good Ol PA Anthracite...nut size is biggest I can get here but would love to try some Stove size if it was available.
Today its a Balmy 18 degrees outside and my Glenwood is munchin on 20/25 lbs of Nut per day and is CLEAN ..I must state this again verses "BIT COAL" CLEAN!...and just purrin away makin nice warm heat these units were desighned and built for anthracite and they are NOT bituminous friendly :mad: .
post your results please as I got smacked down when I tried Bit in my Glenwood.
Thanks,
Tim



I'm going to give it a try. I can get 100 lbs for just a few dollars. The quality of the coal makes a big difference. We'll see. I'm not getting my hopes up though.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: Tim On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:44 pm

keep us posted on how it works out for you
Tim
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak #30

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: dcrane On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:56 pm

half-pint wrote:
Tim wrote:Jason,
I hope your experiment goes well but I think you will find it a TERRIBLE mess....I also tried to burn some good screened and washed PA Bit "NUT" size in my #30, thinkin of $$$ savins as you are and here is my tale!
I got 2 5-gallon buckets to try in it and the smoke,clinkers,back flashes and other problems that came rushing at me were NOT worth the trouble...I threw the rest of the 5 gallon buckets down over the bank.....you will quickly destroy your refactory lining tryin to bust up the bridged over mess that will cover your burn pot and down inside in like 3 hrs. Bit will not just slide down the refactory lining like anthracite it sticks, clinks and bridges something fierce forcin you to go at it with a poker! and well the rest is just nothing buit a PIA!...I hope your experiment goes better but I have my reservations.
After like 20 or 30 lbs. in my experiment ...i was back on my Anthracite Nut so fast u cannot imagine!
My Glenwood is super happy on Good Ol PA Anthracite...nut size is biggest I can get here but would love to try some Stove size if it was available.
Today its a Balmy 18 degrees outside and my Glenwood is munchin on 20/25 lbs of Nut per day and is CLEAN ..I must state this again verses "BIT COAL" CLEAN!...and just purrin away makin nice warm heat these units were desighned and built for anthracite and they are NOT bituminous friendly :mad: .
post your results please as I got smacked down when I tried Bit in my Glenwood.
Thanks,
Tim




I'm going to give it a try. I can get 100 lbs for just a few dollars. The quality of the coal makes a big difference. We'll see. I'm not getting my hopes up though.


Im VERY interested to hear your findings after Tim's comments :eek2: go get some and fire it up!!! I wish i had refurbished Glenwood ... i wanna play too! :mad:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: joeq On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 5:21 pm

Dr. Crane, you guys with your Glenwoods and wannabes are killing me. Beautiful pieces of fine art. My problem with yours is it appears that you have it "hidden away" in your BASEMENT(?) If I owned a stove like that, it would be up stairs in my living room, in front of the 6' picture window. It's like hangin the Mona Lisa in a bathroom. :D
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: wsherrick On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 5:55 pm

If you want one, all you have to do is go out and buy one. Now, however; there is a waiting list at both Antique Stove Hospital and at Barnstable Stove Shop. The Base Burner Renaissance is now under full steam. I received a long letter from someone who makes nano parts for computers and has a large company. He saw the videos on youtube and doubted my claims as to the absolute superiority of these stoves. He now has a Glenwood No 8 which he bought from Doug at Barnstable that he now heats his home with. He has no more doubts I am humbled and excited when I get correspondence like this.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: echos67 On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:52 pm

Another happy owner here !
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¥
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: joeq On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 7:24 pm

[quote="wsherrick"]If you want one, all you have to do is go out and buy one.

"Wanting one" is easy. "Buying one" is a whole new ball game.
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: half-pint On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:33 pm

joeq wrote:
wsherrick wrote:If you want one, all you have to do is go out and buy one.

"Wanting one" is easy. "Buying one" is a whole new ball game.


It's not a purchase. It's an INVESTMENT. One I'd do again in a heartbeat. The Glenwood was not only an investment in a good stove, but a part of history. Yes, my Glenwood is in the basement, but that is how my home is set up. It gives me the chance to finish the basement working around the Glenwood making the area really show it in a way it deserves.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: kstone On: Sat Jan 19, 2013 9:16 am

I have a question about an old stove it does not fit my application but it is old and look well designed.

the station agent series i have seen on CL the 14 the 16 and a 22 they appear to be 100 % cast iron no sheet metal back plate so very heavy and robust they also seem to not use a indirect back pipe but they do seem to use a primary and secondary chamber for exhaust. the secondary is the area after the top neck back down then there is a huge plater or plateau with an exit port way over at the edge are these an efficient design or is this a design meant to produce ungodly amounts off heat only.

they look good they have that vintage connection to the old railroads so resale is a possible to make a profit?

is it a good design what is the plus and what the minus off the design is it a bituminous only design ? is this a burn anything kinda like the godin's design

i have more questions but i hope the response will cover those questions
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kstone
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Andes 14 crown
Coal Size/Type: nut

Re: The "Old Way" is working the best for me.

PostBy: echos67 On: Sat Jan 19, 2013 9:25 am

joeq wrote:
wsherrick wrote:If you want one, all you have to do is go out and buy one.

"Wanting one" is easy. "Buying one" is a whole new ball game.


You can try and locate one that is unrestored and do it yourself, this can be done over the Spring Summer and Fall to lessen the initial impact costs. The Nickel trim can be replated at any time, just make sure to use it those pieces when running the stove because they really move the air around. This is the way I did mine and it was so much fun I'm looking for another stove to do.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

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