Protecting Trailer tires

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: dtzackus On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:45 pm

I wasn't a believer of the whole Nitrogen either, but I was sick and tired of adjust my tire pressure every two weeks at the local Sheetz store, free air.

When I bought my last truck, I opted for the $20 bucks to add the Nitrogen in my tires. I would check them, and never saw a difference in tire pressure. Not sure what the science is behind it, but they do not have the pressure issues I had with just regular air.

Go figure...
dtzackus
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:08 pm

dtzackus wrote:I wasn't a believer of the whole Nitrogen either, but I was sick and tired of adjust my tire pressure every two weeks at the local Sheetz store, free air.

When I bought my last truck, I opted for the $20 bucks to add the Nitrogen in my tires. I would check them, and never saw a difference in tire pressure. Not sure what the science is behind it, but they do not have the pressure issues I had with just regular air.

Go figure...


The two Nitrogen (N2) molecules are physically larger than the two Oxygen (O2) molecules. Nitrogen cannot escape through the same size hole that Oxygen can. It is also inert unlike O2 . O2 will eat it's way out, especially at the bead joint where the heat of friction increases the oxidative reaction. O2 has the double-whammy ;) Nitrogen doesn't even have a punch.

I found the same pressure stability that you did too. I bought a used car from my brother who had filled the tires with N2. Never had to add any pressure to the tires for the entire tread life!
VigIIPeaBurner
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: rberq On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 7:50 pm

VigIIPeaBurner wrote: I found the same pressure stability that you did too. I bought a used car from my brother who had filled the tires with N2. Never had to add any pressure to the tires for the entire tread life!

We have to add air in winter and bleed air in summer because the temperature change causes such a big difference in tire pressure. In between times I generally don't see enough air seepage to be a concern unless a tire has an actual leak. And, I drive enough so the tread gets worn out before oxygen can make the tire deteriorate. I suppose nitrogen fill could make some difference for vehicles that are driven very little, where the tires will last many years -- but protecting the tire from sunlight (UV rays) and ozone probably is more important.

But dammit, the real issue is, I won't pay for bottled water when my well produces perfectly good water, and paying for nitrogen-enriched air likewise goes against my Scrooge principles.
rberq
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: Short Bus On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 8:53 pm

Air has a high percentage of Nitrogen
Nitrogen molecules are bigger.

If Nitrogen will not leak out of small leaks then fill with regular air and the leak should stop becuase only the oxygen will leak out leaving behind the nitrogen.
I have never seen a tire heal it's self in this manor.
Short Bus
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: dtzackus On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:21 pm

Bob wrote "But dammit, the real issue is, I won't pay for bottled water when my well produces perfectly good water, and paying for nitrogen-enriched air likewise goes against my Scrooge principles."

I agree, but just knowing that I do not have to check the tire pressure as often as I did, lets me enjoy the simple things in life...a cold beer or a nice warm coal fire....

I had the same issue with XM Radio, I thought it was stupid, until I got it. I really enjoy it now. Go figure.. Guess I am getting "soft" in my old age...
dtzackus
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: Yanche On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 11:03 pm

VigIIPeaBurner wrote:
dtzackus wrote:I wasn't a believer of the whole Nitrogen either, but I was sick and tired of adjust my tire pressure every two weeks at the local Sheetz store, free air.

When I bought my last truck, I opted for the $20 bucks to add the Nitrogen in my tires. I would check them, and never saw a difference in tire pressure. Not sure what the science is behind it, but they do not have the pressure issues I had with just regular air.

Go figure...


The two Nitrogen (N2) molecules are physically larger than the two Oxygen (O2) molecules. Nitrogen cannot escape through the same size hole that Oxygen can. It is also inert unlike O2 . O2 will eat it's way out, especially at the bead joint where the heat of friction increases the oxidative reaction. O2 has the double-whammy ;) Nitrogen doesn't even have a punch.

I found the same pressure stability that you did too. I bought a used car from my brother who had filled the tires with N2. Never had to add any pressure to the tires for the entire tread life!

This is good information. I'll be putting Nitrogen in all my tires. Not Nitrogen from a tire shop but from my own Nitrogen tank. I have a small portable Nitrogen tank that I use to leak test A/C refrigerant lines. I also use the Nitrogen to purge copper refrigerant lines while brazing them. It makes a much cleaner inside brazing joint. I have both a pressure and a flow regulator for the Nitrogen tank so all I'll need is some tire valve stem adapters. Exchanging the cylinder at my HVAC wholesaler was about $20. I use so little I've never had it re-filled, might cost a lot more now.
Yanche
 
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Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Fri Jan 25, 2013 12:14 am

Short Bus wrote:Air has a high percentage of Nitrogen
Nitrogen molecules are bigger.

If Nitrogen will not leak out of small leaks then fill with regular air and the leak should stop becuase only the oxygen will leak out leaving behind the nitrogen.
I have never seen a tire heal it's self in this manor.


~21% O2.

No, I wouldn't expect it'd heal itself. The O2 continues to eat at the metal/bead contact area constantly creating more and ever bigger corrosion zones. Eventually all components of air will find its way out if the problem is left unabated.

N2 would be best for new to slightly used wheel assemblies. No corrosion gets a foothold, less problems as the wheel ages. Once the corrosion begins, it has to be eliminated and sealed to stop it. Otherwise, it becomes a maintenance thing especially with Al alloy rims. I don't think N2 preserves the tire as much as it does bead integrity.

I've never personally paid extra to fill with N2. I have an air compressor. If I was set up to fill N2, I'd use only N2, even if compressed air was just as handy. I've had aluminum rims on my vehicle since new in 97. For the last ten years I've cleaned the rim bead three times and it just keeps getting worse. It's not a matter of letting it sit either - she's got 241,000 on the odo. ;) I'm checking tire pressure and refilling about every two weeks. If I could rewind time, they'd be filled with N2 from the get-go:(
VigIIPeaBurner
 
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