INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Chiefcamper On: Sun Jan 27, 2013 1:45 pm

Went out yesterday and bought a 'T' and a baro kit for my 6" dia vertical pipe run up to the thimble. The length is about 11". I don't think I'll be able to keep my manual damper, or maybe there is a way to fit it in. My chimney 'seems' to draft sufficiently as long as my draft knob is opened up enough. But it is a bit touchy and the best setting changes with temps, pressure, wind, and also where the stove is since last shaken down and loaded. Lot of variables.

I'm hoping with the manometer and baro damper I'll be able to set my draft knob feed a little higher in the morning when it's generally colder outside. Then as the temps warm through the day, the baro should close some and help the stove along.

Hope I'm getting this right.

If anyone has any thoughts or tips I'd be happy to hear them.

The stove is a Godin Grand Oval. It has a deep burn cylinder and the only control on the stove is a draft knob on the front door at the bottom, so I'm hoping the Baro will help even things out. Quite a few have already suggested installing the Baro to make life easier and I'm just getting around to it now :)

Kinda Excited to See How It Works Out!!!

Thanks,

Joe
Chiefcamper
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Heat N Glo
Stove/Furnace Model: Townsend II

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:39 pm

Get a thermometer for the stack while your at it.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:36 am

If you are experiencing a yo-yoing of temperature with your stove, the baro will help it run more steady 8-)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

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Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: vmi1983 On: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:58 pm

Hey Chief....

Good luck on the baro install. Unfortunately, I've never used one... in another thread, an experienced coal burner made a sensible
point...
measure your draft... see if the problem is/isn't chimney related.I am sure others will chime in....

Matt..
vmi1983
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin Large Round/ La Belle Epoque
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Anthracite

:) SWEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEET!!!!!!! :)

PostBy: Chiefcamper On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 3:07 pm

Thanks Dudes.

Got it done yesterday and started the stove up about 4pm. This thing is ssssssssswwwwwwwwwwwwEEEEEEEEEEEEEET :)

Got it up to temp, set the damper so it was slightly opening. Burned all night and it held at 600 no draft knob adjustment. Never had that happen before :) Today it's been holding steady. Kinda fun to watch the flapper do all that work on its' own, and think about how the constantly changing draft would have been sending me in all directions before this. (Yeah I'm a little stoked on this)

I planned on using a manometer yesterday but my buddy fell through and didn't bring his over, but I do plan on installing one permanently soon.

The stove manual calls for .04 to .06 inches. I just happen to have the damper set at .04 and it's working well. I know the setting probably isn't that accurate and not even where I'll be measuring once I install the Mano, but it's just so great to see it burn so steady!!!!!!!

Also want to thank everyone that suggested getting one over the past year. It would have helped if I'd done it sooner.

Joe
Chiefcamper
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Heat N Glo
Stove/Furnace Model: Townsend II

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Chiefcamper On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:17 pm

Just a Follow Up,

The season is just about over for me, at least for coal anyway. The Baro has helped tremendously. Getting constant and consistent burns with almost no adjustments.

I never did get around to installing a manometer. I've read instructions for setting a baro over a hand-fired stove without a mano, and that's pretty much how I set it.

I had concerns over burning wood with the baro, It worked fine. It eliminated the need for me to manually damp it down when the logs started blazing, kept the pipe from overheating, and improved my burn times with wood. I only burned wood so far when I was burning out the coal, so starting a woodfire w the open baro should show wether I get some smoke in the room when lighting it or not.

I think I'll be OK though.

Joe
Chiefcamper
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Heat N Glo
Stove/Furnace Model: Townsend II

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: dcrane On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:31 pm

I refuse to answer the questions on the grounds it may incriminate me :lol:

Just a lil' humor to make some laugh ;)
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:42 pm

Chiefcamper wrote:The Baro has helped tremendously. Getting constant and consistent burns with almost no adjustments.

Perfect 8-)

Chiefcamper wrote:I had concerns over burning wood with the baro, It worked fine.

The concern with a baro and wood is that the baro will feed a chimney fire caused from creosote build up.. Be careful with this combination partner :)

dcrane wrote:Just a lil' humor to make some laugh
:roll:
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Chuck_Steak On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:42 pm

The cool thing about using a baro, and burning wood,
is, because a wood fire usually creates a much stronger draft,
with the baro wide open, you can actually watch the flames
roar up your stove pipe..

Dan
Chuck_Steak
 
Coal Size/Type: mostly nut, sometimes stove, Santa brand
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark III

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: dcrane On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 8:56 pm

Chuck_Steak wrote:The cool thing about using a baro, and burning wood,
is, because a wood fire usually creates a much stronger draft,
with the baro wide open, you can actually watch the flames
roar up your stove pipe..

Dan


Lightning is right here mate, he gave the one most dangerous reason which building inspectors and insurance company's would have issue with.

other reasons are that the baro will cool and slow the flu to a point where your building up to 5 times the creosote you normally would, which means $$$
for cleanings and down time for inspections.

are you using a pre EPA woodstove?
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: KLook On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:30 pm

I have to differ with the wood and Baro warnings. Yes, we were taught this growing up.
My brother has been running a Baro in his wood boiler for at least 4 years now, burns year round. Nothing makes creosote like a boiler, and his is no exception. He has a 8 inch Metalbestos chimney running straight up from the back with a cap on the bottom of a tee to look the whole length of the chimney. the baro has a small build up of "fuzz" on the back after 4 years. The boiler works far better with a consistent draft, the SS chimney reduces creosote, and he burns anything he can stuff in it in the warm months to prevent overheating so I don't want to hear about only burning walnut, cut on the dark of the moon, dried for 2 centuries and blessed by a pope. Spruce,Fir, and Hatmatack(Tamarack or Eastern Larch) are notorious for creosote normally. He allows the stovepipe thermometer to run at 400 to 550 and the amount of air the baro pulls in does not increase the problem obviously. The main point being to be an informed burner. I have people tell me that wet wood creates less creosote. I am not buying that either. Besides, the amount of energy required to boil or make steam of the water and then put it up the chimney to condense is wasteful. Do the math, it takes to much energy that wood does not have and makes a mess in the chimney.
In addition, he has NO sticky stuff running out of his stovepipe like most wood burners and you guys would have people believe that the baro would worsen that situation.
If he gets a chimney fire going, yes it will feed it. That is why we used insulated pipe and bigger clearances. Let er rip.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:58 pm

Metalbestos is good to 2100*...
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: Chiefcamper On: Mon Mar 11, 2013 9:11 pm

Geez I guess I opened a can a worms. (he he)

Yes I realize that an open pipe will feed a chimney fire. I burn coal throughout the winter. In the fall I have a few wood fires. I also use wood to burn down the coal if I shut it down for a week of warmer temps. Makes for less half burnt coal and more ashes when cleaning it out. When spring temps hit, such as now, I'll have a few more wood fires. Wood is more or less for ambiance and taking the chill out for the evening. By the time I turn in, the stove only has an ember bed w/ no flaming wood left. Then it goes out on its own.

I bought all my own cleaning tools and do it myself. I've done it twice this season and came up w/ about a cup (8oz) or less of coffee dust each time. Gonna spread some on my neighbors sidewalk since his dog shits in my yard. Creosote.

The stove is 1840's design. The logs stand up in it.

I don't feel comfortable having my pipe at 600 degrees going into a 10 inch round clay flue... Maybe 300 on the pipe and the stove will get up to 550 with wood. The stove gets hotter and the wood lasts at least twice as long w/ the baro. I was constantly damping, checking, feeding more air, etc w/ the manual damper. Now I just use the draft feed knob on the stove. I only have one control on the stove and that's it besides opening the door. I've seen a lot of flame in the pipe w/ the manual. (just thru the holes for the manual damper rod) I've never gotten flame w/ the baro. So these temps are unquestionably too low for a safe wood burn????

I understand and appreciate what some of you are saying, but I'm only using it to heat the room in the evenings when the family is down there and I can keep an eye on it. Not burning it 24/7 to heat my house.

If the exhaust system is kept clean I see no danger.

If you disagree don't hesitate to tell me why. I had no idea that a baro with wood was considered a No-No. Always interested in learning but not always easily convinced. I'm not a pro by any means and appreciate the feedback!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks,

Joe
Chiefcamper
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Heat N Glo
Stove/Furnace Model: Townsend II

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: KLook On: Mon Mar 11, 2013 9:41 pm

It would seem you take all the correct precautions and dont burn wet wood for long periods. Your temps are fine! If it is working don't change a thing, people were just injecting their opinion as was I. I should have mentioned my brother also occasionally put some kind of powdered "chimney sweep" in his boiler. I can't say how effective this is. He figures it doesn't hurt anything.
Old timers I grew up with advocated burning constantly to keep the flue temp up, burn hot to minimize creosote and keep the flue hot and draft high, and don't ever smolder a fire for long periods. If you need a little heat, burn a small fire hot and let it go out. Many here do not subscribe to my theories so you will hear other opinions. These old timers had just single brick chimneys with wood built right up against them. Seems most of the fires were people that didnt follow the rules. My parents house is so old it had trees for studs between the beams, vertical boards on purlins made of flattened trees on the roof, and birch bark for flashing around the ancient windows. It had one central chimney with three thimbles, two of them were in horizontal "flues" made of brick. :shock: Seen it in many old houses in Maine and they are still standing. Until someone comes along and smolders a fire for weeks. Epic chimney fires.
Another opinion some don't like, masonry is fine for coal, it sucks for wood. Especially if it is on the outside of the house. I had one I built with a liner 23 years ago and even though I burned it hot, ruining a Vermont Casting Vigilant twice, I still had chimney fires. It was inside all the way to the peak and would be hot to touch, but the creosote would form just as soon as it exited the roof. Never had another chimney fire I worried about after I installed the wood boiler with the insulated metal chimney.
Just pay attention and follow your instincts.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: INSTALLING A BARO NEXT WEEKEND

PostBy: blrman07 On: Tue Mar 12, 2013 7:27 am

There are so many issues with this last post that I am clueless where to start!! :help:
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: installing a VC 2310 this summer
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

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