New Stove Question

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:03 am

Photog200 wrote:
wsherrick wrote:Congratulations on you getting a very good stove. Your Gem Dockash is an upscale, fine quality oak stove. Gems were very well made and certain models of Dock Ash Base Burners are very desirable. They are hard to find as this was a localized Foundry in Scranton, PA. They turn up around this area quite a bit.
I can assure you that your stove does not take an 8 inch pipe. It is most likely a 6 inch pipe, I'm almost certain 99.9%.

The shaking crank will be easy to find. You can also make do with a socket wrench.
I know you want to burn wood during the Spring and Fall.
Once you find out how much easier and more reliable coal is as fuel, then let's see how much wood you end up actually burning.
This stove will be more than adequate to heat your home. Take your time during its overhaul. Don't break anything due to impatience.

Thank you William for your response. I would like to let you know that it was your videos that turned me on to these old stoves. If I had not seen them, I certainly would have been stuck with one of those newfangled ones.

I knew when I saw the stove in person that it was a very well made stove and I knew it would work well for me. I am not in the position to be able to do a complete 100% restoration right now but hopefully this summer I will be able to send the nickel out for re-plating. I have some house construction projects coming up this spring which will require time and money. BTW, I someone sent me a link to one of the shaker handles on e-bay, I just have to measure the end of the shaker to make sure it will fit.

I had a small section of 6" pipe in the garage and it was a good 2" shy of even coming close to fitting. I did not have a section of 8" to try...I guess I have an odd one my friend! I am sure you are right about probably wanting to burn just coal when I find out how easy it is! I am already finding how contagious it is just getting this stove ready for its first firing.

One question I do have for you, the fire pot sits on a base and that base was all nickel originally. In my opinion or my taste that would be way too much "bling" for me. I was intending to paint it black. Down the road if I decided that I wanted it as original and wanted it plated, would painting it cause any damage? I am assuming they would sand blast it anyway before plating.


No worries painting the base as yes that would blast it first. Use a quality stove paint like Thurmalox. The shaker handle is a triangle I would imagine? So measure what you need and ask the e-bay seller. there's lots of them around in antique stoves.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 7:07 pm

rockwood wrote:Some older stoves required 7 inch pipe but I would be very surprised if it required 8 inch.

I just went and measured the circumference of 6, 7 and 8 inch pipe...

6 is approx 19 1/4"
7............22 1/4"
8............25 1/4"

Thank you Rockwood for the measurements. I found a piece of 8" pipe and it was too big and the 6" was too small and I was feeling like Goldie Locks so I guess it is 7". The flue measures exactly what you said 7" pipe is...I did not even know they made 7" pipe! I guess I am getting broke in fast in these antique stoves! Found a place online that is sending me 7" pipe, 8-7" reducer and the damper, will go out tomorrow. Have the Mica glass on the way and the stove gasket on the way.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 7:10 pm

SteveZee wrote:
Photog200 wrote:
wsherrick wrote:Congratulations on you getting a very good stove. Your Gem Dockash is an upscale, fine quality oak stove. Gems were very well made and certain models of Dock Ash Base Burners are very desirable. They are hard to find as this was a localized Foundry in Scranton, PA. They turn up around this area quite a bit.
I can assure you that your stove does not take an 8 inch pipe. It is most likely a 6 inch pipe, I'm almost certain 99.9%.

The shaking crank will be easy to find. You can also make do with a socket wrench.
I know you want to burn wood during the Spring and Fall.
Once you find out how much easier and more reliable coal is as fuel, then let's see how much wood you end up actually burning.
This stove will be more than adequate to heat your home. Take your time during its overhaul. Don't break anything due to impatience.

Thank you William for your response. I would like to let you know that it was your videos that turned me on to these old stoves. If I had not seen them, I certainly would have been stuck with one of those newfangled ones.

I knew when I saw the stove in person that it was a very well made stove and I knew it would work well for me. I am not in the position to be able to do a complete 100% restoration right now but hopefully this summer I will be able to send the nickel out for re-plating. I have some house construction projects coming up this spring which will require time and money. BTW, I someone sent me a link to one of the shaker handles on e-bay, I just have to measure the end of the shaker to make sure it will fit.

I had a small section of 6" pipe in the garage and it was a good 2" shy of even coming close to fitting. I did not have a section of 8" to try...I guess I have an odd one my friend! I am sure you are right about probably wanting to burn just coal when I find out how easy it is! I am already finding how contagious it is just getting this stove ready for its first firing.

One question I do have for you, the fire pot sits on a base and that base was all nickel originally. In my opinion or my taste that would be way too much "bling" for me. I was intending to paint it black. Down the road if I decided that I wanted it as original and wanted it plated, would painting it cause any damage? I am assuming they would sand blast it anyway before plating.


No worries painting the base as yes that would blast it first. Use a quality stove paint like Thurmalox. The shaker handle is a triangle I would imagine? So measure what you need and ask the e-bay seller. there's lots of them around in antique stoves.

Got quite a bit done today on the stove, have a long way to go. Spent some time just cleaning the parts today...4 buckets of water for just 3 pieces! 100 years of yuck! Thanks for your help on this. Not sure if you saw the other post I did, but the vent pipe turned out to be 7" flue...I had never even heard of 7" pipe. Thanks again for your help
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

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Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: LsFarm On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 7:59 pm

a suggestion for cleaning the nickel and the rusty iron. Use a toilet bowl cleaning product or dilute Muriatic acid.

I use a rubbermaid dishpan, rubber gloves and 0000 steel wool. pour a few inches of cleaner or dilute acid in the dishpan, then use the steelwool like a sponge to apply the cleaner let it sit for a few minutes, then gently scrub off the corrosion..

PLEASE do this outside or in a very well ventilated place.. the fumes from the interaction of rust with the muriatic acid can be dangerous..
But the muriatic acid will remove the rust, and turn the iron into ready to paint metal..
You MUST rinse the acid off or paint will not stay on the parts..

You will be amazed how well either Lysol toilet bowl cleaner or 'the works' cleaner cleans up old, blackened nickeled parts.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: dlj On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:29 pm

Photog200 wrote:
rockwood wrote:Some older stoves required 7 inch pipe but I would be very surprised if it required 8 inch.

I just went and measured the circumference of 6, 7 and 8 inch pipe...

6 is approx 19 1/4"
7............22 1/4"
8............25 1/4"

Thank you Rockwood for the measurements. I found a piece of 8" pipe and it was too big and the 6" was too small and I was feeling like Goldie Locks so I guess it is 7". The flue measures exactly what you said 7" pipe is...I did not even know they made 7" pipe! I guess I am getting broke in fast in these antique stoves! Found a place online that is sending me 7" pipe, 8-7" reducer and the damper, will go out tomorrow. Have the Mica glass on the way and the stove gasket on the way.



Hmm, I would have asked for a 7" to 6" adapter... Pipe should go from larger diameter to smaller, not smaller to larger.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: KLook On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:08 pm

Hmm, I would have asked for a 7" to 6" adapter... Pipe should go from larger diameter to smaller, not smaller to larger.


:? ?? If you have an 8 inch chimney how are you going to get it to go smaller? From 7 inch to an adapter to his 8 inch chimney, unless I missed something back there. Maybe already has and 8 inch baro and wants to use it? I thought it always went from smaller to larger. Never choke it down.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:42 pm

dlj wrote:
Photog200 wrote:
rockwood wrote:Some older stoves required 7 inch pipe but I would be very surprised if it required 8 inch.

I just went and measured the circumference of 6, 7 and 8 inch pipe...

6 is approx 19 1/4"
7............22 1/4"
8............25 1/4"

Thank you Rockwood for the measurements. I found a piece of 8" pipe and it was too big and the 6" was too small and I was feeling like Goldie Locks so I guess it is 7". The flue measures exactly what you said 7" pipe is...I did not even know they made 7" pipe! I guess I am getting broke in fast in these antique stoves! Found a place online that is sending me 7" pipe, 8-7" reducer and the damper, will go out tomorrow. Have the Mica glass on the way and the stove gasket on the way.



Hmm, I would have asked for a 7" to 6" adapter... Pipe should go from larger diameter to smaller, not smaller to larger.

dj

I did ask for that, they did not carry any 7" oval to 6" or 8". I have a 8" SS chimney so I asked for a reducer to 7" so I can use the 7" pipe and go straight to the stove
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:44 pm

KLook wrote:
Hmm, I would have asked for a 7" to 6" adapter... Pipe should go from larger diameter to smaller, not smaller to larger.


:? ?? If you have an 8 inch chimney how are you going to get it to go smaller? From 7 inch to an adapter to his 8 inch chimney, unless I missed something back there. Maybe already has and 8 inch baro and wants to use it? I thought it always went from smaller to larger. Never choke it down.

Kevin

That is correct, I wanted to go from a 7" oval to 8" round and run it right up to the chimney.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:00 am

Yeah actually I think my Glenwood 208C cookstove might have that same 7" oval on it but goes to 6" round.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:11 am

gratz on the new stove, im sure it will burn coal alot better then any Jøtul could. I hate seeing when a wood burner attempts to convert to coal by using a wood stove to do so because inevitably what happens is the wood burner whined up hating coal without ever realizing how much better it can be. Ive learned that the ONLY reason to burn wood for the purposes of heating your home would be if you are one of those few who can obtain your wood for free (if you have to pay for your wood I dont believe their is any valid reason not to convert to coal). Coal burns longer, hotter, its cheaper and it moves easier then wood, it does not create creosote, and it does not bring in termites and rodents and bugs.... its a "no-brainer" as they say :P
Last edited by dcrane on Tue Feb 12, 2013 2:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:25 am

forgive my stupidity but could someone please PM or post pics of these prismatic grates for me? thank you in advance!
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:30 am

dcrane wrote:forgive my stupidity but could someone please PM or post pics of these prismatic grates for me? thank you in advance!


Go to this link, and the last photo of the model '40' stove shows it's prismatic grates.

greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: Photog200 On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 3:43 pm

dcrane wrote:gratz on the new stove, im sure it will burn coal alot better then any Jøtul could. I hate seeing when a wood burner attempts to convert to coal by using a wood stove to do so because inevitably what happens is the wood burner whined up hating coal without ever realizing how much better it can be. Ive learned that the ONLY reason to burn wood for the purposes of heating your home would be if you are one of those few who can obtain your wood for free (if you have to pay for your wood I dont believe their is any valid reason not to convert to coal). Coal burns longer, hotter, its cheaper and it moves easier then wood, it does not create creosote, and it does not bring in termites and rodents and bugs.... its a "no-brainer" as they say :P

Thank you! Having fun getting it cleaned up and repaired where needed. I am not doing a complete restoration at this time on it, just doing stuff to it that make it functional and look nice in the living room. I don't want to spend the money right now to have the nickel re-plated so I am just going to paint it silver with high heat paint. The nickel was in rough shape and on some, it was gone entirely. I agree with the fact of the ease of wood and it also costs almost as much as coal. However, for the same price in coal you get a lot more heat. I am looking forward to the longer burn times than wood. I have electric heat so when I am gone, it cost a lot to heat this place.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: dlj On: Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:05 pm

KLook wrote: :? ?? If you have an 8 inch chimney how are you going to get it to go smaller? From 7 inch to an adapter to his 8 inch chimney, unless I missed something back there. Maybe already has and 8 inch baro and wants to use it? I thought it always went from smaller to larger. Never choke it down.

Kevin


Ah, he's going to an 8 inch chimney so that makes sense. Must have missed that from earlier... You certainly wouldn't want to go 7" to 6" to 8".... But if he'd had a 6" flue, that would have worked fine... In that sense he wouldn't be "choking it down"...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: New Stove Question

PostBy: SteveZee On: Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:12 am

dcrane wrote:forgive my stupidity but could someone please PM or post pics of these prismatic grates for me? thank you in advance!

You've seen them D, Just not called prismatic. They are bar grates with 3 sides geared in pairs like in my Glenwood MO116 (Two pair) and 208C cookstove (one). Prismatic because they are triangular.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Visit Hitzer Stoves