Pellets the new fuel.

Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: KLook On: Fri Oct 18, 2013 8:12 am

Hey KL, please don't do an expose of the Hudson Valley. If we apply your brand of ruthless logic I would run screaming from the place. I kinda know it stinks but I prefer to live in a dream world. When do you do an analysis of life in Chattanooga, Tenn? It's saving grace is that it is near NEPA an that is very important these days but I struggle to find another reason.


I am doing my research even now on the Tenn. valley Coalnewbie. :lol: And N. Ga. My train ride up into the Hiawassee valley last weekend revealed that they have done the same thing down here but trees grow faster. I was shocked to go by a Huber plant on the bus to get on the train up in Etowah. All that plant needs is chips and they don't need timber size trees for chips. Much of the river gorge was inaccessible too logging so it retains a natural balance of vegetation on the slopes at least. On one section they pointed out a strip leading to the river where they had logged the mountain and let them roll straight down hill to the river. Sort of like the log chutes in the old days in Maine.
Pellets are just another way to strip the forest down for profit. Maine already lost a huge amount of money with the tree growth law(which should be repealed) and no one talks about the fact that forest research states you can only pull 2 maybe 3 crops of wood off the land when you strip it before it will not regenerate desirable species due to depleted soils. Take take take, never put anything back. It does not work. As with the biomass boilers, they promoted chips as burning junk wood and slash. LOL They only want premium wood for either. To much resin in softwoods and junk wood and it makes poor pellets and gums up the biomass boilers even though they burn at ridiculous temps. All over Washington County the trees coming up are white birch, red maple, and other undesirable species. Now they are spraying to kill hardwoods and promote softwoods. There is a problem for the wreath companies getting "tips" to make wreaths. They are sending in TT loads of brush from N. Maine and Canada. Worchester Wreath has purchased thousands of acres and has stripped them completely, and been fined and is still fighting in court, to manage the land for fir trees, well spaced out to produce brush. It is also not a natural thing but a monoculture.

I don't hate everything new, I just see through to the reason for the shift and think I understand what the drawbacks are to the new method. I am old enough and have a keen enough memory to remember the lies told to promote the new ways. I also know the results of the spray program in the 70's to save the fir forest long enough for the companies to bring in new machines, clear cuts, and salvage all the money they could at the expense of our overall forest and health. It fits into my pessimistic personality.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: katman On: Fri Oct 18, 2013 8:38 am

Darn Kevin, while I agree most corporations are by design going to find the least costly way to maximize profit and the environment pays in the end, what's the solution? People keep making babies and they gotta be fed and housed. Last time I checked we weren't about to authorize mass sterilization and we weren't making more land so if someone wants to try heating with switchgrass or algae I say go for it. I did my bit as a journalist writing about Love Canal and other environmental issues in the old days but we have come a long ways since then. I wouldn't be so hard on some of those softwoods and other quick growing scrub trees the lumber companies are planting. Softwoods are considered by many to be some of the best feeder stock for pellets used in residential and commercial boilers. They may not be a suitable replacement for the Maine hardwoods lost through overharvesting, but growing and harvesting them in the southern tier keeps a lot of people employed.
katman
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Magnum
Other Heating: Harman PB 105 Pellet Boiler

Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Oct 18, 2013 10:38 am

Whenever i walk in the woods and see all those stone walls, surely it must indicate that we have more trees than in the [past, at least in New England.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

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Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:21 pm

michaelanthony wrote:
carlherrnstein wrote:Sam switchgrass is planted in CRP land, the government will pay land owners to take there land out of cultivation and plant switchgrass.


Sooooooo is this as non-profitable as growing corn for ethanol?



The land has to be within so many feet of a waterway, its for wildlife habitat the land owners around here do it so they don't farm where it floods and they still get paid for the land.
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: KLook On: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:54 pm

I will respond to franco first. Yes, NE was cut over severely in the early years. If my memory serves me, the upstate areas of NH, Vt, and Mass and probably NY were decimated for charcoal. I believe the logging rules in those states are very restrictive as a drive through any of them will show more large trees then anywhere in Maine except Baxter. And if you look at infrared photos of the states that show tree types and distribution, there is a stark line at the Maine border. We as people denuded NE long ago just to build homes, build ships, then send it out as lumber(Bangor was the lumber capitol of the world) and burn it as fuel to survive before other heat sources. This left large swaths untouched as the technology to get it to mill and port did not exist. They could not cut down enough at one time to do what has been done to Maine with new technology. And something is preventing them in other NE states or you would know what I mean.

Darn Kevin, while I agree most corporations are by design going to find the least costly way to maximize profit and the environment pays in the end, what's the solution? People keep making babies and they gotta be fed and housed. Last time I checked we weren't about to authorize mass sterilization and we weren't making more land so if someone wants to try heating with switchgrass or algae I say go for it. I did my bit as a journalist writing about Love Canal and other environmental issues in the old days but we have come a long ways since then. I wouldn't be so hard on some of those softwoods and other quick growing scrub trees the lumber companies are planting. Softwoods are considered by many to be some of the best feeder stock for pellets used in residential and commercial boilers. They may not be a suitable replacement for the Maine hardwoods lost through overharvesting, but growing and harvesting them in the southern tier keeps a lot of people employed.


The solution in Me. is not one of depriving people of housing and food. I have no opinion about switchgrass or algae. Not part of what I know. If the gov. is involved you can bet someone is making a healthy profit to kickback to some politician. You mistake the types of trees Maine grows. You assume they are replanting everywhere. Softwood is the mainstay of the Western, Northern, and Eastern forest with plenty of Pine and Hemlock throughout the state. With the milder weather in the last 30 years, we have seen the spread of hardwoods as Maine sits on the line between the coniferous and deciduous forest. This is subject to change as the weather does and lets not get into global warming. They are NOT planting trees to make pellets! Here is how it works.....A company owns huge wood lots, they log it for the product they want. They then sell it to company B which figures out how to sell the remainder of the wood on the lot. They then sell it to company C which has a subsidiary(family member/separate business)which bypasses the rules about buying land and stripping it down to a field and subdividing it. They raze the property for any biomass left and have already sold to company D(realtor/subdivider) before they cut it, retaining the rights to harvest it. People from S. NE come up in droves and buy 100 acre lots at rates considered dirt cheap by their standards and get their little house on the prairie dream. Some bought them and contacted local wood harvester thinking they had bought a chunk of Baxter. Who loses? I saw over 5000 acres go this route and now it is fragmented up into small lots with differing opinions about road maintenance and property lines etc. etc. It will never be a large contiguous lot that will grow trees and benefit the local economy like before. Something will grow back as this lot had been cut in the 1950's and then twice in 2000's. Will power and homes go in? So far no. It is too remote and the road is already giving it up as it was just thrown down over a mud road made in the 50's to get the wood out. Plus the economy tanked.
I could go on and on.....
If you have some journalistic tendencies, look into the budworm program of the 70"s in Maine and let me know if I can give you some sources. Some have died but stories remain. And the damage and results of it remain. From complete collapse of the wildlife and fish and bay creatures to the unbelievable high cancer rates in the people.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Pellets the new fuel.

PostBy: dmcd On: Thu Feb 20, 2014 7:52 pm

Not sure why it is hard to understand why we went with a PELLET Boiler.
First being there was a GRANT involved to promote the MAINE economy.
From 12/7/12 to 3/15/13 we saved $70k vs. the past 7 years average on # 2 fuel cost.
Check out BIOMASS MAGAZINE JULY 2013 issue, it is on there as well. Please keep in mind where they print 5 Million it is .5 (half Million)
There is a vast amount of useful and intellegant information on this site. I have been following it for a while. I am part owner of McLaughlin & Sons and we are the Reading Dealer here in this area
I run a AA260 here at my home and another at my Parents. Like them both, soo much easier than cordwood.
I welcome any one of you to contact me to check out the SCHMID at MRH, we'll discuss ASH when you are here.
dmcd
 

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