Sources of anthracite in NC?

Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: Pices On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:53 pm

My Big Jack forced hot air furnace claims to burn wood and coal. After a difficult heating season last year using wood, I would like to try nut size anthracite. I suppose I should bite the bullet and get some bagged coal shipped in, but if the furnace works well, I would like to find a lower cost supply. I am located near Tryon, NC, in the western foothills near South Carolina. Any suggestions?
Pices
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alpha American Co.
Stove/Furnace Model: Big Jack BJ90

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:22 pm

Dead silence on the coal but it's nice horse country in them hills. BLack Forest, Asheville and points South are cute but the anthracite sources are limited and expensive.... and no I would not burn KY bit myself. Perhaps horse poop.
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 2:51 pm

Pices wrote:My Big Jack forced hot air furnace claims to burn wood and coal. After a difficult heating season last year using wood, I would like to try nut size anthracite.


Before you go through any of this trouble post a picture of the grate system/inside of the unit. Often these units labeled wood/coal are primarily wood burners and don't work with anthracite. If you're going to burn coal you need a coal burner. Once we see it you'll get better advice on whether it may work. From there I would get a limited quantity of coal to test it out. Be sure to read the topics on lighting and maintaining it before trying to light it becsue it's completely different animal than wood. For properr operation you need to fill the firebox once it's lit, heat output is controlled by the amount of air instead of the amount of fuel.


Basically you need something that has deep firebox and air from underneath all the way around. This is the EFM firebox from their wood/coal boiler and if you don't have something similar it's probably not going to work very well:

View: New PagePopup
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite


Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: LDPosse On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:11 pm

Found a link to the stove online. From what I can tell, it looks like this stove would be best suited to bituminous coal, if you were going to give coal a try.

Yukon-Eagle Website wrote:Secondary Burn
The right amount of the air from the combustion fan is directed under the fire. Twenty percent of the air (called secondary air) is directed above the fire to ignite the unburned gases and smoke created by the main fire. The result is high efficiency wood burning.


This would probably work well for bituminous, from the standpoint of burning off the volatiles efficiently. Anthracite needs virtually no overfire air, though.

Another item that I'd be concerned about, is the fact that the grate appears to be fixed, and not a shaker style. With the amount of ash you get with coal, that could be pretty troublesome.

http://store.yukon-eagle.com/big-jack-w ... 4AodBTIAhg
LDPosse
 
Stove/Furnace Make: DS Machine, Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: DS1500, Heatrola

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: Pices On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:21 pm

Yes, it does have a fixed grate, and since I have never heated with coal before, I don't have a full appreciation of that limitation.
However, I should provide some more details: I am heating a greenhouse with this furnace, it has a combustion fan operated by a thermostat and the hot air blower is automatically controlled by the plenum temperature sensor. Because I am heating a plastic greenhouse, I am very concerned about ash and soot, not only for potential burns through the plastic but also accumulation on the plastic and blocking sunlight.
On most days, with normal sunshine, the greenhouse is heated very well during the day with solar heating, and it actually must vent to avoid over heating. I don't know if it is possible to build a coal fire that will last only 14 to 16 hours? But most days no daytime heating is required.
The manufacturer recommends nut size anthracite coal, but notes bituminous coal will work but has more soot, etc. I have sent them a message inquiring if a shaker grate is available. Thanks for your help with this.
Following is a picture of my firebox.
Big Jack firebox S2180004.jpg
(115.41 KiB) Viewed 10 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]44619[/nepathumb]
Pices
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alpha American Co.
Stove/Furnace Model: Big Jack BJ90

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:17 pm

There is two problems with that firebox, A) the grate does not extend across the entire bottom of the firebox and B)there is no shaker grate. I would suggest it is going to be very problematic.

Pices wrote: Because I am heating a plastic greenhouse, I am very concerned about ash and soot, not only for potential burns through the plastic but also accumulation on the plastic and blocking sunlight.


Anthracite would certainly be right up your alley as far as that goes.


I don't know if it is possible to build a coal fire that will last only 14 to 16 hours?


It's possible but isn't something you'll want to do, that's going to be a lot of work among other problems. If you need something that needs to be on demand your best bet is a stoker becsue that can reduce it's consumption to just enough to keep the fire lit.

One forum member here is from NC, he moved from NJ and took his EFM stoker boiler with him. He's in Warreton, not sure if that is close to your location. He'll be able to help you out some especially with a source for coal and the costs. :D
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: gunloader55 On: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:12 pm

Found ant coal at Hoyle's in lincolnton nc 704-735-6021 little high 450 ton but i was going to va. paying 100 in gas for 325 ton so works out better for me. hope this helps
gunloader55
 
Stove/Furnace Model: Glenwood 6 & wm 414a

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: Pices On: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:47 pm

Found ant coal at Hoyle's in lincolnton nc


Yes, that is in range, but I think others have convinced me that I probably don't want to burn anthracite!
Pices
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alpha American Co.
Stove/Furnace Model: Big Jack BJ90

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: 009to090 On: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:47 pm

Yeah, your on the opposite end of the state than me. I know where you are, my grandparents lived right above you in Spruce Pine.
Because of the lack of dealers down here, I just hire a trucking company to go to the Ant coal mines in PA, and get me a 24 ton load. MUCH cheaper than any dealer down here. Unfortunately, I burn Rice, which will not work for you.
Whatever you decide, you should try a small quantity before taking the big leap.
009to090
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: gunloader55 On: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:01 pm

if you don't mind me asking what does load cost
gunloader55
 
Stove/Furnace Model: Glenwood 6 & wm 414a

Re: Sources of anthracite in NC?

PostBy: 009to090 On: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:08 pm

Depends on the cost-per-ton for the coal you select, and the delivery charges for the trucking company you hire to deliver it. I paid $150 per ton for the coal, and $35 per ton to have 24 tons delivered. That was in 2011.
009to090
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice